"Body Rock" Exhibition at Central Tattoo Studio

"Body Rock" Exhibition at Central Tattoo Studio

Central Tattoo Studio and Create! Magazine are pleased to present the opening of a group exhibition titled "Body Rock".

The show includes the work of five artists inspired by tattoo culture. This exhibition includes work by artists that interpret the theme by using their unique style, subject and creative approach. 

Opening: September 22, 6pm

Where: 

Central Tattoo Studio

171 W Girard Avenue

Philadelphia, PA 19123

Exhibition dates: September 1 - October 28, 2018 

About Central Tattoo Studio

Central Tattoo Studio is a fine art forward, custom tattoo studio in Philadelphia, PA. Our first floor gallery space features rotating exhibitions from local and emerging artists whose work bridges the gap between fine art and tattoo work. Our second floor tattoo studio hosts tattoo artists with a strong understanding of the foundations of fine art; color, form, line, space and composition. Our tattoo artists specialize in watercolor tattoos, abstract/graphic tattoos, geometric tattoos and black and grey realism tattoos.

Participating Artists

Tracy Kerdman

I was born in Huntington, West Virginia. A city now known as the heart of the opioid epidemic. At the age of five I moved to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. I studied painting at the College of Charleston where I earned a BA in Studio Art. In 2010, I moved to New York to continue my study of painting at the National Academy Museum and School and MoMA, where I would take extensive lecture classes. My paintings have been exhibited in Germany, Canada, New York and throughout the United States, from the Korean Cultural Center in Los Angeles, to the Museum of Fine Arts in Tallahassee, Florida. I live and paint in Hell’s Kitchen in NYC with my husband.

My work largely draws from the cultural inconsistencies of my background of growingup on the Grand Strand of South Carolina, a place recognizable for its hospitality, and paradoxically, its bigotry. Figurative painting is what drives my interest and helps me to explore contradiction and anxiety buried in normalcy. The work aims to be familiar and within the realm of conventional, figurative oil paintings only at first glance. Working within the context of traditional representational work and portraiture, the goal is to create something unsettling and more disconcerting than an academic, technical representation.

www.tkerdman.com

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Brandi Merolla

Born: NYC

BFA: Photography & Drawing, Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University.

Art Director Tower Records 4th St./Broadway, NYC 1983-1986.

Merolla Displays; Custom 3D foam-core displays for record companies, FAO Schwarz, Howard Stern Show. 1986-2018.

The ritual art of tattooing has been practiced since ancient times. Then in 1876 Thomas Edison invented the "Electric Pen" in the age where electricity began to make it's way into our culture. Famed tattoo artist Samuel O'Reilly then used this new modern invention to tattoo in NYC. 

At that time, mostly sailors got tattooed. They had their bodies marked with patriotic, nautical and religious symbols. For the next few decades tattoo designs expanded to include memorial, sports and romantic symbology to a broader audience.

In my new body of artwork, I take tattoo flash from the years 1900-1940 and I blow them up from 2" high drawings to 3'-4' high 3D foam-core sculptures. I stay true to these primitive line drawings and make them larger than life just as they are remembered historically. My reverence for these original designs explains the scale shift. 

https://www.scenesfromtheattic.com/tat-art

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Brandon Straus

My paintings are a visual dialogue about the contemporary and historical relationships between art and commodity fetishism. With respect to traditional subject matter such as still life, interiors, and portraiture, my paintings explore the material world and question their current cultural implications and narrative potential. Modernism, fauvism, and orientalism mingle in my compositions in flattened rendering, brush stroke and color, and still life objects. 

My source images come from online shopping, design magazines, social media, and personal objects. In their combination they create a visual archeology of personal identity. My compositions use vocabulary that addresses themes of queerness, Judaism, and historical modern painting with humorously self-aware nonchalance.

https://www.instagram.com/brandon_straus/

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Mishal Weston

Mishal Weston (1988) is a Zimbabwean born designer and artist based in Cape Town, South Africa.

As I walk through the streets or meander down the beach, my eyes wander from side to side looking for little treasures to collect. Things that are beautiful in my eyes, but that some may find strange. Through a shifting lens, I capture objects from a different perspective, looking closer than most seeing more than the naked eye would care to take in.

But then I look up and see the marked collections of stories adorned on flesh. Stories that within their marks tell a story, each line, dot and shadow overlaying a crease, a blood vessel, a mole or even a story past and now covered. Now collecting the collectors.

https://www.instagram.com/mishalweston/

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Julianne Merino

Julianne Merino (1991, Hickory, North Carolina, United States) is a New Orleans based visual artist. Combining sewing, collage and painting, Julianne juxtaposes the process of painting, that has a predominantly masculine history in western art, with sewing –considered women’s labor. She graduated from Pioneer Valley Performing Arts with a concentration in costume design in 2010 and with a BFA from Massachusetts College of Art + Design in 2014. Julianne has worked as a printmaking instructor and as a journalist of art in New Orleans. 

I take dolls very seriously. I started making paper dolls from magazine cut-outs and scraps of fabric as a child. Using these materials as an adult, my work reimagines the definition of what a doll is. As marionettes, paintings, or collages, these female figures sit waiting for something to happen to them.The passive female figure is an enduring theme from old master paintings to fashion magazines to vintage pin-ups. 

I work on translucent vellum, painting, collaging & sewing from front and back to create layers with a distorted sense of depth, reminiscent of skewed perspective from the medieval period. A visual hierarchy emerges that subverts traditional power structures. Rather than a scene the viewer might step into, these landscapes feel more like a reverie, replete with all the non-linearity of a sleepy-eyed subconscious. 

Through collage, I juxtapose classical symbols and quotidian commercial imagery, challenging culturally inherited assumptions about femininity. The disharmony between these two extremes allows me to critically explore and decode their meanings & create a cipher of personal iconography. 

Sewing & embroidery, which I first learned from my mother, has historically been women's work passed down through generations. I have expanded my craft amid costuming culture in New Orleans, specifically learning from the work of a Mardi Gras Indian chief, and now employ these materials as a visually stark departure from my collage and painting, an art form dominated by men throughout western art. I engage these mediums to complicate gender dynamics of not only theme, but process. 

I will further develop my process, including threading into paper, printing onto fabrics, and deepening the relationship between textile and mixed media works. I want to focus on making interactive pieces, like marionettes, and sculptural work. I’d like to incorporate family heirlooms, sewing and putting them into new works, creating a sense of femininity through generations. I want to juxtapose this familiarity and intimacy with the dark, satirical, & extraordinary imagery of Mardi Gras culture. 

I’d like to create tapestries and/or wearable art that combines embroidery and 2d imagery, reminiscent of secret fraternal banners, but through the classic iconography of women throughout different history/ religions. What if women had their own secret orders? What would their traditions and symbols be? I’m drawn to this double standard because secret fraternal orders were considered to be wise and ritualistic, whereas women were considered to be heretics and witches. These were the archetypes that capitalism had to destroy. 

Using embroidery looms, silk-screening and beading, I’d like to create 3d fabric pieces, reminiscent of medieval hell mouths and the faces on old Mardi Gras floats. Creating pieces that viewers can interact with is important to me, whether through puppetry, wearing, or unveiling something hidden under a piece of cloth.

This residency is an opportunity for growth — not just spatially or methodically, but also a growth in the sense of community. I feel excited thinking about this residency as a chance to be surrounded by like-minded and supportive people. 

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Celebrating YOU! Info about our October event at PAFA and podcast interview with Kate Young

Celebrating YOU! Info about our October event at PAFA and podcast interview with Kate Young

Sheila Cuellar-Shaffer

Sheila Cuellar-Shaffer