Paradigm Gallery: Scott Albrecht at Scope Miami Beach

Paradigm Gallery: Scott Albrecht at Scope Miami Beach

Scott Albrecht was born in 1983 in New Brunswick, NJ, and raised in Bethlehem Township, NJ. In 2003, he received a degree in Graphic Design from The Art Institute of Philadelphia. Scott is currently based in Brooklyn, NY and a member of The Gowanus Studio Space. His work incorporates elements of woodworking, hand-drawn typography, geometric collage using vintage printed ephemera and found objects and has been published and exhibited both domestically and internationally.  

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What inspired your recent work?

A large part of my work is directly inspired by daily experiences or relationships that I have and I wind up using my work as a way to get a deeper understanding of what’s happening. I think this past year I’ve been influenced by a lot of situations that overlap on one another, and I’m more and more trying to understand my relationships and take stock in what is important. 

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How do you come up with the geometry and color palette in each piece?

All the works in this collection, in one way or another, stem from abstracted typography, so the base of each piece builds up from an underlying message. Since the words themselves are abstracted, the color palettes do a lot of the initial work in terms of setting the mood and tone of a piece. I spend a lot of time trying to think about how that idea can be translated with color.

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Tell us about the work that will be on display at Scope during this year’s Art Basel Week in Miami. What is this year's focus?

I’ll have a collection of new woodworks on view with Paradigm Gallery that are stemming from a few different series’ that I’ve been working on and evolving. Each work is comprised of several dozen (if not 100+) individually cut pieces of wood that are then sanded, painted and re-assembled.

Conceptually a bigger theme for me this past year has been the idea of acceptance and understanding and learning to embrace a situation as-is. I think the works in the collection that I have been meditating on the most are a triptych stemming from the Wabi Sabi philosophy that all things are imperfect, incomplete and impermanent.

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What is a day in a life like for you? How do you find a balance between your studio practice and other commitments?

Each day varies depending on what I’m working on or what my focus is, but I try to keep a pretty large pool of projects and pieces going that I can work on so that if I get burned out or just need to switch gears I can do that and come back to whatever it is with a fresh perspective. One day I might be in the wood shop working on some pieces, the next I might be getting proposals together or making a zine… it really varies day-to-day and I like that flexibility to keep the days from being monotonous. In terms of other commitments, I’ve learned that giving myself a set schedule in the studio is really important. I generally work from 10-7 and having that cut-off forces me to really focus on what I need to get done that day, otherwise I’ll totally just work all day and all night.

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What is an important element in your work that you want viewers to be aware of?

I don’t know that I want viewers to be aware of anything in particular. Because the work is more abstract, there’s something really nice in that someone may see something that I may not see, or that they can form their own relationship to a piece.

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Share a piece of advice with other artists that helped you along the way.

Always keep going. The harder you work, the better luck you have.

Also don’t compare yourself to other people. Everyone is at a different time and place in their journey.

Pierrette Marisa Komarek

Pierrette Marisa Komarek

Jee Won Park

Jee Won Park