Studio Sunday: Kristen Elizabeth
Elizabeth_Kristen_Studio_02.JPG

We’re bringing back Studio Sundays and this weekend we’re so excited to be introducing you to one of our PxP Contemporary artists, Kristen Elizabeth! Learn more in our interview below and then don’t forget to check our her available works in our premiere exhibition ‘Pilot’, which is currently on view online!

Artist Biography:

Connecticut based artist, Kristen Elizabeth (b.1986) formally educated in Industrial Design, has been developing her unique artistic voice over the past several years. Having grown up on the coast, she is heavily influenced by the sea and the dynamic tension between power and balance that can be observed around us. Her work seeks to draw viewers in through bold movement and a counterbalance of intricate mark making. Her use of a wide variety of materials such as acrylic, graphite, pastel, and more creates a visual statement that can be experienced on multiple levels. In addition to her art, she has been involved in many creative projects including painting a 50ft tall likeness of Lebron James in Harlem's famed Rucker Park, as well as - developed a new logo and fashion illustrations for New York's influential FABB charity event.  Her work has been featured in multiple publications including Create! Magazine, Art Reveal Magazine, and The Wall Street Journal.  

Elizabeth_Kristen_Studio_01.jpg

How did you first become interested in art and can you explain a bit of how it led you to the work you create today?

As long as I can remember, I’ve always had a passion for art. I grew up in a creative family and had practicing artists on both my mother & father’s side. I’ve always had a desire to be creative, but felt I had to be practical. Because of this, I majored in product design and was approaching graduation right at the beginning of the recession in 2008. The career and life I had been envisioning for the past four years all but evaporated, but this allowed me freedom from a traditional path and ultimately set me on the course to where I am today. It’s been quite a ride - with both highs and lows. I hope to express this dynamism that is life through my current and future works.

Describe your current studio or working area. What is most important about it or one thing that you definitely need in your creative space?

I currently divide my time between my small home studio and a larger studio space where I run my business, a children's art studio called SplatterBox. My space at home is peaceful, harmonious and filled with the books, art, and music I love. That space allows me to focus on smaller more contained works using mostly watercolors and inks. SplatterBox allows me the room to stretch out and work on larger pieces without worrying about making a mess - hence the name SplatterBox. That said, it can be a challenge! It can often be hectic & stressful but it is also highly rewarding. I was able to not only lead a fulfilling path teaching kids but also re-discover my passion for art amongst all the glitter, unicorns, & beautiful mess.

Tell us about the inspiration behind your work.

I really try to absorb my environment. I find the people and places around me to be incredible resources. I’ve found that some series tend to draw from specific experiences, while other inspiration could be found in more ethereal experiences. My ‘Mineral Girl’ series was completely inspired by a trip to the amazing mineral room at the Peabody Museum in New Haven, CT. To contrast that, my ‘Geo Swoosh’ & ‘'The Change’ series took from something much more intuitive and deep within myself. I spent much of my childhood by the sea and observed everything from grey misty mornings to deep dark raging storms. Drawing from these visual memories as well as exploring life experiences I had, helped guide my hand.  You can see this in everything from the large sweeping motions to the tapestry of delicate details and patterns.

What one piece of creative or business advice would you give to your younger self?

The one piece of advice I would give my younger self is DON’T WAIT. On pessimistic days I might see it as time wasted, but I have had a range of other experiences and challenges that inform my art today. That said, I held back from truly jumping into my art career for many years and wish I had started that path sooner. It can be intimidating to put yourself out there, but if you keep delaying and putting it off - you’ll never know what opportunities might come your way.

What are you working on now and for the rest of the year?

Right now I’m coming off of an exciting job working for FABB (The Fashion Accessories Benefit Ball) & can’t seem to stray from creating high contrast fashion illustrations. I’ve found these very cathartic and they allow me to create without the pressure of a series or having any constraints imposed (self or otherwise). I’m happy to say they have enabled me to gain a clear headspace and I now have two new series I’m in the process of designing. Both will be an expansion & evolution of my previous work. As a side note, I have to give a nod to the Podcast - Art & Cocktails - for the invaluable information learned while listening to the episode ‘How To Design A New Series’.

View her collection of available works with PxP Contemporary here!

The Stranger, Solo Exhibition by Alex Merritt at Booth Gallery
Alex Merritt - Hermedic Bliss 78x78.jpg

Booth Gallery is proud to present The Stranger, a debut solo exhibition by Alex Merritt, on view May 17 - June 12, 2019, at 325 W. 38th St in New York. Popularly known for his large-scale oils and brutal approach to painting, Alex Merritt will be exhibiting 20 new paintings and drawings in large and small formats.

Merritt’s works include a recurring motif visualized through expansive landscapes juxtaposed by isolated figures which directly confront the viewer. In works like “Hermetic Bliss” (detail above), the subject is visceral and haunting yet vulnerably human. A distinct narrative is intentionally concealed and left for the viewer’s interpretation, much like the artist’s process: it is hidden amongst the layers.

Through a constant working and reworking, the paint is scraped down and built up to range from a thick paste to liquid. The sheer physicality of the canvases showing layers of paint 3-4 inches in depth reveals they are as much of an object sculpturally as they are a 2-dimensional image. Subject and object become one, and the finished works represent a direct result of these layers, weaving in and out of one another, often obfuscating the literal.

Merritt’s influences include the likes of Chaim Soutine, Joan Eardley, Antonio Mancini, and Frank Auerbach; Inspired by their bravado to compose large-scale works and to experimentation with surface quality.

Alex Merritt was born in 1981 in Washington, DC. In 2015, he received his B.F.A. in painting from the Mary- land Institute College of Art and in 2018 completed his MFA from The New York Academy of Art. The artist joined Booth Gallery in June 2018; this will be his first Solo show to date. Works from are in numerous private collections worldwide and currently has had a collection of works acquired by liana Gore Museum in Tel Aviv, Israel.

On Friday, May 17, 2019, an opening reception will be held from 6-9pm and is open to the public.

Good Vibes Only: Negativity in the Art World and How to Fight it
mark-adriane-259950-unsplash.jpg

The more we put ourselves out there, the more people will share their opinions of us and our work - both good and bad. It’s amazing to have people express interest in your art on social media and especially in person. We hope that you appreciate the encouragement, internalize that you are deserving of the positive support, and enjoy returning the compliments as much as Kat and I do! But as they say, it’s not always sunshine and roses. It’s likely that you’ve encountered negativity in the art world and it can be difficult to be at your best when the attitude of others doesn’t match your own. I’ve broken down a few common situations below to identify and overcome these unnecessary sources of drama!

Ignoring the ‘Starving Artist’ stereotype

“So what are you going to do with that?” was a question that I would often get from people when I told them that I was studying towards a BFA (and when I was in grad school for my MA in Art History too!). My response was almost always met with a look best described as halfway between puzzled and concerned. After working in the arts for the past ten years, however, I feel more empowered in this field now more than ever. For example, while there is still tons of progress to be made, we are seeing more women and people of color taking charge and making their way into the roles and institutions that had previously been out of reach. Choosing to pursue a creative career shouldn’t feel like it limits your options. From exhibiting nationally and abroad, working for galleries and art fairs to museums and non-profits, starting a business, writing a book, and more, it isn’t what can an artist do...it’s what can’t we do?

It took me quite some time to arrive at the realization that my possibilities were not limited by what others think artists are capable of. While it can be disheartening that not everyone will be 100% supportive of your goals, you don’t need anyone else’s permission to follow your passion. When you put yourself in the mindset that anything can happen, things can surprise you in the best way!

steve-halama-485156-unsplash.jpg

Minding your Ps and Qs

When Kat and I went to Miami in December 2018, what really stood out to us was the incredible variety of art that we saw (at over ten fairs!). This is one of the things that we appreciate most about this industry: the art world IS big enough that everyone can find their place in it. Not everyone will be represented by blue chip galleries or exhibit in museums, but you do not need to do either of those things to find supportive collectors and share your work with people from around the world. With this in mind, push yourself to be a savvy networker: keep business cards with you, have a memorable elevator pitch ready to go, and don’t be afraid to speak up about your accomplishments.

Here’s an example:

Kat and I stopped at a booth to admire a piece we liked. A man walking by paused next to us to introduce himself as the creator of the work, explain a bit about it, and as he was on his way to do something else just quickly ended the conversation by saying: “Thanks so much for looking at my work. Here’s my card. Please keep in touch!” Keep your business interactions professional and polite, which will ensure that you leave a great impression.

The art world is great for making new connections and finding your niche, but be very careful about burning bridges. It is so unfortunate that for as much good as social media has done for artists, it has also given some people the false notion that they should use it to criticize others. Whether it’s posting disrespectful comments or even trying to preface a remark with “I don’t mean to be negative but…”, engaging in that kind of behavior online will guarantee that the other person will not want to work with you. What if down the road they are the link to a big opportunity that you would have loved to be a part of?

I’m sure you’ve also seen the comments that start off with “sorry to be the one to say this but…”, as if this excuses poor behavior. They’re never from someone who writes criticism as their profession. Rather, it is a cheap way of putting aside guilt when they know that the second half of what they’re going to say is unnecessary and negative. It is highly unlikely that any person with a valid reason for being critical of something would apologize for it.

The same holds true with overreacting to not being selected for a gallery or exhibition. We know that it is disappointing and frustrating, especially if you’ve applied more than once. We’ve been there! You send your best work and hope that it will be picked, but sometimes it just doesn’t happen. I actually discuss rejection in much more depth both in our first book ‘The Smartist Guide: Essential Art Career Tips for Emerging Artists’ as well as on the Art & Cocktails podcast, but my best advice is to stay positive, try to be gracious, and move on. Something better is coming!

debby-hudson-555209-unsplash.jpg

Developing a thick skin

I strongly believe that artists should support artists rather than get sucked into competing with or comparing yourself to others and it is especially disappointing that even today, you still see women who think it’s okay to put down other women (why?!). Remember that everyone is on their own path and even if another artist is finding success that doesn’t mean that you never will. Jealousy will only distract you so keep working hard and be patient that your time will come when it’s meant to. It’s also important to bear in mind that people rarely post about the hard times and struggles that they go through. If all you see are sales and exhibitions, it may seem like an artist achieved ‘overnight success’ when in reality they had to put in blood, sweat, tears and years of effort!

Negative feedback or unsolicited advice (not actual constructive criticism) can feel annoying at best and devastating at worst. As your initial reaction might be defensive, first ask yourself if it is even worth it to continue a discussion with this person. If you still feel the need to respond do so concisely and politely, but don’t expect anything in return. It will be up to you to tune them out, delete their comments or even block them. Kat shared a quote with me a while back that really resonated with me that was something along the lines of “nobody doing more than you will criticize you, only someone doing less.” The people who go out of their way to bring you down are simply dealing with their own feelings of insecurity. While it’s unfortunate that they have to take it out on you, focus instead on the awesome people who are genuinely there to encourage you and what you do!

Kat and I are so happy that the community of readers of both Create! Magazine and The Smartist Guide is a positive place for artists to share, connect, grow, learn, support, and inspire or be inspired by one another. We know this isn’t always how it is and that it can be difficult not to let the fear of facing negativity interfere with or stop you from putting yourself out there. But if it is your dream to be an artist, we encourage you to do it anyway!


Cheers!
Alicia

alicia@createmagazine.com
@puigypics


Loreal Prystaj
Untitled_self_portrait_1.jpg

Loreal Prystaj is a visual artist from New York now based in London. Presently she is attending the Royal College of Art, to obtain her MA in photography, and previously received her BFA in photography at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) in New York City. Surrounded by a thriving “fashion environment” she planned on becoming a commercial photographer but chose to take a Fine Art direction where she felt she could express her ideas more freely.

She has had three solo exhibitions and participated in over thirty group exhibitions, including Arles Photo Festival (2018), MIA in Milan (2016) and selected to show with LifeFramer's travelling exhibition (2017).  Her work has been seen in galleries throughout the United States, Europe, Japan, and China, and she presently has pieces included in the permanent art collection at the Erie Art Museum, Pennsylvania, since 2014.  Prystaj’s archive of work has led to guest lecturing at accredited universities, such as NYU, FIT and Columbia, in New York. She has been awarded jury prizes from more than ten photography competitions internationally, including Ashurst Art Prize (2018), ArtSlant (2017), Neutral Density (2016), and TIFA (2018), alongside with being published widely, from The Guardian (2018), The British Journal of Photography (2018), My Modern Met (2017) to multiple articles in L'oeil de la Photographie (2017, 2016, 2015).

Statement

Her work often exposes the relationship between a specific time and space, with a juxtaposition of the human form and its environment. She expresses ideas through her photography and uses the medium consistently - in installation and interactive pieces - as well as using herself as a character or form in her images, performance and video work.

Maggie Evans
01Followthe_Leader.JPG

Maggie Evans is an artist based in Savannah, Georgia.  She uses painting, drawing, and site-specific installation to examine human collective behavior and the power structures, homogeneity, and social divisions that result.

Maggie’s work has been included in over fifty national and international juried exhibitions and a number of art publications, including New American Paintings and Manifest Gallery’s INPA 6.  Artist residencies include The Hambidge Center for the Arts, The Vermont Studio Center (full fellowship) and the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, China.  She has had fourteen solo exhibitions and has been invited to lecture on her work at a number of institutions including Indiana-Purdue University and the University of Texas, Dallas. 

Maggie holds an MFA in Painting from the Savannah College of Art and Design (2008) where she has been a part-time Professor of Foundation Studies since 2009.  In addition to her work as an artist, she performs regularly as a professional jazz singer and bassist.

09_Human_Hierarchies.jpg
Collective_Amnesia.JPG
Internal_Dialogue.jpg
Plateau.jpg
public_reckoning_04.jpg
Silent_Aspiration_03.jpg
Status.jpg
PxP Contemporary Gallery Launch | 'Pilot' Exhibition
collage-rectangle.jpg

Create! Magazine and PxP Contemporary are pleased to announce the launch of our online gallery and first-ever exhibition, Pilot. Like the premiere episode of an exciting new television series, we are thrilled to be bringing you a first look at our platform, our artists, and our curatorial style. The story behind the gallery is simple: we want to create a place where buying affordable works by talented artists from around the world is a seamless digital experience.

This first show will bring together highlights from our new roster of represented artists as well as several additional artists that we've invited specifically for this exhibition:

Anna Shukeylo
Brooke Sauer
Eliana Marinari
Huy Lam
Jennifer Small
Jenny Brown
Kestin Cornwall*
Kristen Elizabeth
Marc Scheff
Michelle Lee Rigell
Molly Mansfield
Phyllis Gorsen
Samantha Boni*
Samantha Morris
Seth Remsnyder
Shamona Stokes
Veneta Karamfilova

Any questions regarding Pilot or the gallery in general can be addressed by contacting Co-directors Alicia Puig and Ekaterina Popova at 
info@pxpcontemporary.com.

*Please note that italicized works are shipping from outside of the Unite States and require special shipping arrangements. If you are interested in purchasing works by these artists, please email us directly at info@pxpcontemporary.com. Payment plans are available upon request.

Pilot Exhibition Preview

For full artwork details including size, medium and year, please visit: www.pxpcontemporary.com

Jamie Bates Slone
jbatesslone1.jpg

Jamie Bates Slone is a sculptor living and working in Norman, Oklahoma where she is Assistant Professor of Ceramics at the University of Oklahoma. Jamie received her MFA from the University of Kansas and her BFA from the University of Central Missouri. Her work addresses the fragility of the human spirit in relation to her personal history with physical and mental illness.

Statement

Through conjured memory, I revisit my personal history with physical and mental illness. My current work is a reflection of those memories with an emphasis on the relationship between human biology and human emotion. By using the figure as metaphor, I am able to reflect the sentiments often correlated with feelings of depression, anxiety, fear, and loss.

In my studio practice, anxieties about my own physical and mental health and obsessions with mortality manifest themselves in the choice of scale, charged surfaces, and uneasy body language within the figures. My surface choices are derived from diagnostic imaging of the human body focusing on their color and visual texture. My intent is for one to imagine the surface of the skin as a reflection of what is happening inside the body and mind. These are ideas that are continuously shifting and evolving as I think about how I want these objects to be perceived

jbatesslone2.jpg
jbatesslone3.jpg
jbatesslone4.jpg
jbatesslone5.jpg
jbatesslone6.jpg
jbatesslone7.jpg
jbatesslone8.jpg
jbatesslone9.jpg
jbatesslone10.jpg
Jessica Tenbusch
Jessica_Tenbusch_5_LookingThrough.jpg

Jessica Tenbusch is inspired by the animal and plant species that live near humans. She explores the relationships between species and how they shaped her experience as a human animal. Her work is an observation on our role as ecosystem builders and destroyers. These works are fragments of our daily environment, showing just how close nature is in our everyday lives, embedded in our homes and neighborhoods. In her childhood, she shared her home with a multitude of other animals and hundreds of houseplants. Outside was always inside.

She loves to work in the spaces between two-dimensional and three-dimensional representation and uses color pencil, ink, acrylic paint, wood, metal, and found natural and man-made materials to create sculpture and works on paper.

Jessica received her BFA in 2011 and MFA in 2014 from Eastern Michigan University where she concentrated in metalsmithing and drawing. In addition to exhibiting her work nationally, she is active in the local arts community curating shows and coordinating events. She lives and works in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Her practice is located within Ypsi Alloy Studios, a 3D arts studio she co-owns and runs with two other local artists.

JessicaTenbusch_1_SuburbanEdens.jpg
JessicaTenbusch_2_PrivacyScreen.jpg
JessicaTenbusch_3_SummerSounds.jpg
JessicaTenbusch_4_AzaleaGarden.jpg
Denise Stewart-Sanabria
DeniseStewart-Sanabria_TheDebaucheryofVersailles.jpg

Denise Stewart-Sanabria was born in Massachusetts and received her BFA in Painting from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst. She has lived in Knoxville, TN since 1986.

 Sanabria paints both hyper-realist “portraits” of everything from produce to subversive jelly donuts. The anthropomorphic narratives often are reflections on human behavior. She is also known for her life-size charcoal portrait drawings on plywood, which are cut out, mounted on wood bases, and staged in conceptual installations.

 Her work is included in various museums, private, and corporate collections including: The Tennessee State Museum, The Evansville Museum of Art in Indiana, The Knoxville Museum of Art, Huntsville Museum of Art, Firstbank TN, Pinnacle Banks, Omni and Opryland Hotels, Scripps Networks, Knoxville Botanical Gardens, Jewelry Television, TriStar Energy, and the corporate offices of McGhee Tyson Airport

Artist Statement: Anthropomorphic Food Painting

Our relationship with what we eat is probably one of the most intimate relationships we have during our lifetime. It also, to a certain extent, can be a reflection of each individual human experience. Is what we want to eat risky? Is it adventurous or bland, or perhaps frightening? Is it healthy, or mired in toxic relationships? As a culture, what does our food say about us? If food itself was to enact human behavior, what would it do?

I use contemporary hyper-realism loosely informed by early European vanity painting clichés to explore these ideas. For instance, I’m not sure if 17th-century Spanish Baroque painter Juan Sánchez Cotán hung fruits and vegetables by strings to imitate how wild game was hung up in Dutch paintings of the time, or as a comment on the Inquisition. I like to think it is about the latter when I employ it.

Whether my paintings are an outright statement of some anthropological observation or a narrative of human foibles, I try to insert just enough humor and lusciousness to make them as palatable as possible. If I documented them literally, I would probably have constant censorship issues.

Over the years, I have had pears enact my Inquisition scenes, impaled maraschino cherries on nails, and had donuts enact the seven deadly sins and various fertility rites. My recent work involves allegorical narratives, driven by historical wallpaper appearing behind iconic contemporary baked goods and candy. A classic, regal French design is paired with a partially devoured Black Forest cake and decomposing flowers and then appears again behind a king cake, which is disgorging its Mardi Gras beads. A classic French pastoral toile print in a decidedly non-traditional color looms above a stack of artificially colored MoonPies and junk food. A classic Asian toile that I populated with Godzilla and his fellow movie monsters sits behind a vast array of candy that appears to have also been subjected to radioactive mutation.

I often combine artificially colored food with actual beauty products, such as fingernail polish in #130 Classic Coral Cream Glitter. I’ve actually embedded glitter in a painting to produce a more emboldened form of colored sugar in King Cake Glitter. I am presently continuing the series where I juxtapose a toile pattern I either design myself from scratch or discover, with ironic culinary foregrounds.

Stilllifes, or Vanitas, were originally domestic images containing items symbolic of life and death. Mine are about the human experience.

DeniseStewartSanabria_18thCenturyFrenchPastoralToileCultureShock.jpg
DeniseStewartSanabria_AlienDiscoInferno.jpg
DeniseStewartSanabria_BeetRedVelvet.jpg
DeniseStewartSanabria_De-appropriatedCultural_Fusion.jpg
DeniseStewartSanabria_KingCakeGitter.jpg
DeniseStewartSanabria_OhJuicy.jpg
DeniseStewartSanabria_PinkGetsHot.jpg
DeniseStewartSanabria_PostAtomicCandy.jpg
DeniseStewartSanabria_WhipCreamSplat.jpg
Erin Fitzpatrick
BrynnandKristen36x48OilonPanel2014ErinFitzpatrick.jpg

I am constantly inspired by patterns and prints, my travels, summertime, Instagram, interior spaces, my immediate surroundings, fashion magazines, textile design and meeting new people. I have an iPhone full of screenshots, and sketchbooks, notebooks and a studio wall covered in notes and clippings — my collections of visual stimulants. A seed from these images, a West African textile, a languid Miu Miu model, a Slim Aarons photo of poolside decadence, inspires the vibe for each painting. I plan each piece around this initial idea by creating a storyboard depicting wardrobe, model type/look, textiles, and setting. I source my models from my peers and social media, import textiles, shop for wardrobe, and build a set. I style my models and chat with them as I take hundreds of reference photos. The model becomes the focal point in my world of clashing patterns, textiles, and plants.

I’m a Baltimore native and graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art.  I started painting portraits in 2008 and this body of work now contains hundreds of paintings and drawings of artists, musicians, business people, my peers, and commissioned subjects. I have collectors all across the US and around the world.

www.erinfitzpatrickportraits.tumblr.com

Jasmine36x36OilOnPanel2015ErinFitzpatrick.jpg
Nancy18x24_OilOnPanel2015ErinFitzpatrick.jpg
Nicole24x36inOIlOnPanel2018ErinFitzpatrick.jpg
NicoleInWhite18x24OilOnPanel2018ErinFitzpatrick.jpg
Emma Hill
9_Marshmallow_Falls_.jpg

My abstract paintings are spontaneous and intuitive, expressive and emotionally charged. Each picture begins with a single brush stroke, starting a conversation. A streak of turquoise leaps above a squiggle of parchment and lilac beside a glimpse of fluorescent pink. Prussian blue drips like pouring rain and brilliant white miniature dots light up the sky like stars. Gradually layers of colour build phrases of optimism. Inspired by nature, brush strokes grow, constantly explore, entwine, and then separate and die.

Working on a large format enables a sense of freedom, to get lost within the picture. The painting process follows a journey into the unknown. In taking risks and trusting my intuition, I embrace uncertainty and vulnerability, allowing the accidental to become the structural core. Markings are made, painted over, wiped off, and layered over.

Influenced by the sky and the sea, a painting is given meaning and becomes complete by engaging the imagination of the viewer, who recognises something for themselves. In that moment, a glimpse of the figurative or a hint of a memory begins to form, shapeshifting and disappearing deep into the clouds or ocean.

My artwork aims to create paintings to dream into where we can be happy just to be. Constructing an intuitive world to get lost into, somewhere beyond our vision, past the horizon, between the sky and the sea. A place to return and revisit, to explore and rediscover and while immersed, losing and finding yourself for a moment in time.

www.emmahill.co.uk

10_Cascading_Love_high_res.jpg
17_Smiles_on_a_Grey_Day_high_res.jpg
21_Coral_Kiss_high_res.jpg
22_The_Great_Adventure_high_res_.jpg
Natalie Ciccoricco
1653_Golden_Gate_Ave_300dpi.jpg

Natalie Ciccoricco is a Dutch collage artist, living in California. After moving to the United States in 2012, Natalie started making mixed media collages and illustrations inspired by her new surroundings. Her work is characterized by her use of embroidery thread in combination with other materials, such as old photographs, magazines, books, and other ephemera.

Statement

In my work I weave together new narratives on paper, using embroidery thread and found images. By re-using old materials, it is my hope to give them a new life and meaning. I am inspired by the American landscape, my dreams, nature, arts, literature, and my travels.

My latest series ‘Down the Color Hole’ is an exploration into color and the concept of multiple dimensions. I use embroidery thread on images of old books and magazines to create the visual illusion of a new vantage point - a glitch in space and time from which the image seems to explode or implode, depending on how you look at it.

Cactus_Retreat_300dpi.jpg
In_Perspective_300dpi.jpg
Dan Lam: Delicious Monster at Hashimoto Contemporary
Dan Lam, Lemons, 2019.jpg

NEW YORK CITY - Hashimoto Contemporary is pleased to present Delicious Monster, a solo exhibition by Dallas, Texas based artist Dan Lam. Delicious Monster will be the artists inaugural solo exhibition at Hashimoto Contemporary, in which she continues to explore the opposing themes of the beautiful and repulsive, the attractive and revulsive, and how often these two opposing sentiments can come from within the same source. Referencing these dichotemies, the works in Delicious Monster explore color and form while experimenting with new materials and layering processes.

For her latest body of work, Lam was inspired by the monstera deliciosa fruit, whose scientific name literally means ‘delicious monster.’ Resembling an ear of corn with a green exterior, this hexagon patterned fruit is sweet, delicious and tropical, yet it can cause severe throat and skin irritation if eaten before it has fully ripened. Fascinated by the fruits tempting contradictions, the works in Delicious Monster explores this relatable concept - patience is often tested by temptation, and the excitement and desire to have an experience before the appropriate moment can often result in dangerous consequences.

Exploring a variety of textures, from the shimmering iridescent to pointed spikes, Lam’s sculptures appear almost lifelike, as if they were living organisms from a psychedelic universe. Simultaneously alluring and unsettling, their textures, candy colored hues and organic shapes draw the viewer in, tempting you to touch them and enter their alternate universe.

The exhibition will be on view through Saturday, May 25th. For more information, additional images, or exclusive content, please email nyc@hashimotocontemporary.com

About Dan
Dan Lam is a sculptor based in Texas where she creates otherworldly, psychedelic sculptures. Her work has been featured in New American Painting, Juxtapoz and The Creator’s Project, as well as exhibited extensively in the United States.

Hashimoto Contemporary 210 Rivington Street
New York, NY 10002

Ivana Carman
Carman_1_Tiff.jpg

Ivana Carman (b.1991) is an emerging artist living and working in Philadelphia. Six years ago, she was a psychology major on track toward becoming a psychologist. After taking a few life-painting classes, she realized she couldn’t do anything else, and took a big leap of faith in transferring to The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Little did she know how relevant that field of interest would be to the work she makes today.  

Statement

I find inspiration in the obscured, hidden in cabinets, drawers, and old notes, in the parts of my mind that unfold in solitude. As an observational painter, I’m simultaneously looking out at the world while registering my internal responses and desires, observing the overlooked outside of myself and within.

In my recent body of work, I deepen that exploration of interior vs exterior, expressing acute perceptions of my personal world and the psychological attachments underlying ordinary objects/spaces. I often use windows and mirrors as a symbol for a bridge between two worlds, revealing the ambiguities of the domestic space. Painting deeply personal objects and spaces from life requires a detached eye, making the final work evoke both intense vulnerability and emotional distance.

Carl Jung and his concepts of the unconscious mind – the idea that there is a well of fears, desires, and trauma just beyond the surface – inform my explorations. My recent work draws familiar materials from childhood (cut paper, pastel and crayons), which allows me to respond to my own unconscious desires with naïve spontaneity. After years of restricting myself to paint on canvas, I feel a greater openness to experimentation as my practice expands beyond the weight of historical painting traditions.

Carman_3_Tiff.jpg
Carman_2_Tiff.jpg
Daina Higgins
Higgins_Auto_Maxx_Motors_2018_20x30.jpg

Daina Higgins was born and raised in the Clintonville neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio.  Her early art experiences were at the Columbus College of Art and Design, where she attended Saturday morning classes for seven consecutive years.  During this time she attended Fort Hayes, an arts alternative high school located in downtown Columbus.  In 1997 she received the Silas H. Rhodes Merit Scholarship from the School of Visual Arts in New York.  She moved to New York, and graduated in 2001 with her BFA.
 
Out of a small studio in her Brooklyn apartment, she began making small paintings using a spray paint and stencil technique she dreamt up while looking at Georges Seurat’s drawings.  In 2003, the Rebecca Ibel Gallery exhibited these paintings.  In 2005, Higgins also joined the Elizabeth Harris Gallery, receiving critical acclaim for her 2006 solo exhibition in the New York Times.
 
In 2007, Higgins enrolled as an MFA student at Queens College CUNY.  During the two years of graduate school, she was included in the Queens International 4, a biennial exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art in Flushing, and in 2009 she won the prestigious Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Grant.  Higgins also traveled to California to open a two-person show with Liat Yossifor at the University of LaVerne’s Harris Art Gallery.
 
Numerous publications have documented her paintings, including ArtNews, The New York Sun, The Village Voice, The Columbus Dispatch, and The New York Times.  In 2006 Roberta Smith reviewed my exhibition at Elizabeth Harris Gallery, ending her review with “[she]…creates a poetic awareness of the passage of light, moving through the world, bouncing off things and making visual experience fleetingly possible.”
 
In 2010 Higgins moved to Philadelphia, where she bought a house and studio that she has been renovating.  In November of 2017, she installed "Main Street", a series of three-dimensional paintings, inside storefront gallery Studio Hada in the Mantua neighborhood of Philadelphia. In 2017, Higgins also installed four paintings on permanent view in the Pennsylvania Convention Center (outside of Hall E).


Statement

I developed a traditional studio painting practice out of an adolescence spent as a street and graffiti artist. Because I often worked at night and photographed mine and others’ graffiti, urban night paintings based on photography are central to my work. I am interested in the fleeting nature of mood, tone, and luminosity of the urban environment and how those qualities can be encapsulated in an artifact. I also prefer to work with my hands. Therefore photography is a process that leads to my finished object, which is a painting. I rely on the marketability of paintings to be able to continue my life as an artist.

As a contemporary urban landscape painter my subject has centered around the non-place of the post-modern built environment that is comprised of vast roadside, auto-based businesses, storefronts, parking lots, highway overpasses, and other sites designed to ferry people through space to some far-flung destination. The non-place has been counter-balanced by my concurrent interest in the hyper-local, usually represented as cultural expressions of immigrant business districts in dense east coast American cities. This dichotomy is strongly represented in the inner-ring suburbs where I could afford to live as a New Yorker, and between 2006-2010 I created a body of paintings that depicted colorful storefronts alongside highway underpasses and wide roads planned by Robert Moses. A sense of ‘historicity’ was markedly absent from these paintings and so when I moved to Philadelphia in 2011 I was confronted by history in a poignant way.

I bought an old house on a busy road and watched as the recent development boom consumed multiple historic structures within the community. Curious about my own house, I researched the city archives and learned about its builder, Charles Oscar Struse, and his place in the history of the community. This historical knowledge allowed me to see my street in a new way. As an artist that is now rooted here, I seek to convey what is particular about this place, and I wish to portray the particular weirdness that Philadelphia is known for. I have decided my subject will be my own street, Ridge Avenue, a road that began as a Lenni Lenape footpath. Ridge Avenue has been through many eras of development and yet it never had a Robert Moses, so the layers of time are visible in a smaller format. The largest development era was that of the automobile, and its presence is exacerbated by the geography of the area: a dense suburb atop a steep ridge. Northwest Philadelphia was built in row houses like the rest of the city, and when the automobile came, it changed in remarkable ways. The layers include a drive-thru window on the side of a 200-year-old stone house, a pizzeria crammed inside of a mansard-roofed twin, a chrome diner situated within a cemetery, a bodega next door to a hulking stone church.

I worked with community leaders and in 2018 we were able to halt the development and historically register many of the structures, thereby preserving the layers and details of time past. I plan to continue finding the layers of history and painting what is particular about this place.

Higgins_Commissary_Food_Market_2018_24x48.jpg
Higgins_Oriole_St._2018_18x18.jpg
Higgins_Progressive_Insurance_2019_16x20.jpg
Higgins_Romans_Pizza_Day_2018_24x30.jpg