Humorous and Thought-Provoking Collage by David Krovblit
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Born and raised in Toronto, Canada, David Krovblit studied photography at Ryerson University. He worked professionally as a commercial photographer for over a decade, shooting many international brands and campaigns, and has won numerous awards for his work in the field. He currently lives in California and divides his time between Los Angeles and Toronto.

Krovblit synthesizes diverse references from popular culture, contemporary photography to 19th-century botanical illustrations to create a fantasy universe in his work that is equal parts mesmerizing and seductive.

 

Krovblit's keen eye for composition results in dazzling work, that is humorous and thought-provoking. His collages mirror and comment on the complex world around him - ultimately weaving them into a thing of beauty.

 

Krovblit's techniques bridge old and new methods of producing collage. He uses digital manipulation to scale and print images at various sizes, then reverts to cutting and pasting for the final product.

Collage/Mural Process

 

Collage artists have traditionally been limited by the size of the pieces they find in print. Krovblit's methods allow him to break away from this size restraint through a unique process.

 

He starts by collecting all of the images from different sources: online imagery, posters, magazines, and his original photography. He then brings it all into Photoshop. At this point, he builds the digital file as the blueprint. Once this is complete, all the layers are printed out to the desired size and scale (current work is from 2ft art pieces to 20ft presentation walls). All the visual components get printed onto massive sheets of paper; ready to be hand cut.

 

Once cut, the pieces are reassembled and pasted onto a board or a wall. When everything is in place, the work is carefully sealed with a coating of epoxy resin.

 

Vintage Map Collage by Susan Lerner
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After a career as a Flavor Chemist, and as a mother of two, I was longing for an outlet to express myself and relieve the anxiety of caring for an aging parent with dementia. On a whim, I took a collage class at the 92 Street Y in NYC, and the minute I picked up a straight edge, I fell in love with the medium. In a short four years, I have had the opportunity to exhibit my work in over 20 group shows, including Brooklyn, NY; Chelsea, NY; Edinburgh, Scotland and Rennebu, Norway and have had solo exhibits in NYC and Washington, CT. My work has been published in numerous art magazines and in the newly released book “Collage By Women: 50 Essential Contemporary Artists”. I am a member of @thecollageclub, an exclusive group of collage artists who collage the same page of the same book each week.  In 2018, I organized and curated, @the_collage_garden NYC, an installation in the 6BC Botanical Garden in the East Village, NYC that showcased collages submitted by artists from over 25 countries.

 

Statement

 

I have been intrigued by maps my entire life. Well before GPS, road maps were the only source of guidance for navigating direction. Opening a map in the car leads to the exploration of places unknown. Many road trips with my family encompassed my interests in travel, photography, and adventure. I loved the sense of knowing exactly where I was at any moment, along with the ability to control and direct my experiences. But it was the appreciation of discovering new and exciting cultures that captivated my desire to traverse the world and the use of maps guided me across the globe.

 

Using vintage maps in my new series All Over the Map, I am able to re-envision the connection to my past through hand-cut collage. The use of the maps line, color and symmetry naturally inform the direction of the work. The lines on the map are both symbolically and literally the physical link connecting past and present. The juxtaposition of vintage images, constructed as whimsical and surreal compositions, are used without regard to true context or scale. The places are grounded in reality but embody the attitude that anything is possible.

         

I am motivated by the hunt for the images in print and through the viewfinder. I scour book and tag sales for vintage materials such as atlases, maps, books, magazines, globes and vinyl record albums. This adventure, like the physical journey of the map, parallels my artistic odyssey. The process of hand cutting then layering pieces, which often include my own photographs, into exaggerated form is both meditative and stimulating. Each piece is meticulously cut to create a one of a kind dreamlike composition, which allows the viewer to decide what is true and what is imaginary.

www.mixdmediamashup.com

@mixdmediamashup

Women Working in the Arts: Liza from @curatoronthego

For the next installment of our Women Working in the Arts series we are excited to share the story of Liza, founder of @curatoronthego. She is a Toronto based independent art curator and fine art agent who we recently connected with via PxP Contemporary. After reading about her business, her background in curating, and the exciting projects she has been working on, make sure to check out her top picks from our gallery on Instagram or Facebook!

Tell us a bit about your background as a curator. What kind of work interests you?

Art has always been my passion; as a young girl, I attended art classes, and any time my family travelled, I was excited to visit local museums and art galleries. When I moved to Canada in 2010, I chose Art History as one of my majors and decided that I wanted to work professionally in the art world.

After working in a few local art institutions, I completed my MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice. The program gave me the opportunity to work on larger curatorial projects and meet many amazing local artists, which was perfect for me. My thesis exhibition focused on themes of storytelling and community engagement. When there is a story behind the artwork, it brings value to the piece, and creates a conversation between the artist, collector, and their respective friends and family. I believe that people love art that challenges them and makes them think.

Now, I work directly with artists and help them thrive as art entrepreneurs. This year I helped ten artists who were stuck in their careers and were seeking artistic direction. I mentor artists on how to build a prosperous and thriving art business, and educate them on how to work with art dealers, pricing and market their works, organize exhibition, conduct sales, and more.

Name one woman artist - either contemporary or from history - who has had an impact on you.

I try not to have role models. People tend to copy those who are more successful, and I believe having my own unique story and voice is what is important to me and what I value most in other people. However, I’ve been working with one local artist for the last five years, and she has inspired me to believe in myself, dream big and work smart. Her name is Jessica Gorlicky; she is a Toronto-based fine art and performance artist and has toured around the world speed painting, and making outstanding emotional art, including an international street art movement. Not only is she a talented artist, but also a skilled businesswoman, entertainer, and inspiration for many emerging artists.

What is one piece of advice you would give to emerging artists?

Invest in yourself.

Artists need to invest in their careers. That includes supplies, studio space, and if they work from home, they should make sure to eliminate any distractions. Artists should invest in their career development, like traveling to other countries, exhibiting at international art fairs and shows, and using helpful technology, such as mailing lists, to grow their network. As well, do not be afraid to rely on professionals like accountants, lawyers, and mentors to help you with behind-the-scenes tasks; it will help you to dedicate as much time as possible on art production. Lastly, it’s important to have a clear mindset, and a set of goals for a successful career. If you are not willing to invest in your career, who will?

Do you have any exciting projects, collaborations or exhibitions coming up that you’d like to share? 

In August, I hosted my first Career Recharge Seminar Event for local artists as a platform to get advice and learn from art and non-art professionals, and also as a place to network and share their stories. The event has inspired me to host more art seminars in the future, and to build new platforms for artists, such as online courses to share tips and tools, and guide artists to create profitable art businesses when they are unable to hire an agent or curator, and do what they love. 

In October, I am curating a solo show of one of the artists I currently represent Matt Pine (www.mattpineart.com) in Toronto.

You can find me at www.curatoronthego.com or on Instagram @curatoronthego.

"In the Drift" By Kai and Sunny at Corey Helford Gallery
“Onward Shift” (acrylic on linen, 46” round)

“Onward Shift” (acrylic on linen, 46” round)

Corey Helford Gallery Presents:

In the Drift 
By Kai and Sunny

  

OPENING RECEPTION

September 21, 2019 | 7pm - 11pm

 

ON VIEW

September 21 – October 26, 2019

 

COREY HELFORD GALLERY

571 S. Anderson St. Los Angeles, CA 90033

Open Tuesday-Saturday, 12pm - 6pm

(310) 287-2340

Downtown Los Angeles’ Corey Helford Gallery is proud to announce a solo exhibition of all new works from London-based artist duo Kai and Sunny. Opening Saturday, September 21st in Gallery 3, In the Drift marks the first solo show for the duo at the gallery.

The award-winning duo take inspiration from the natural world and the patterns and forms it manifests. In the Drift showcases the duo's uniquely distinguishable compositions of large acrylic paintings on linen and archival ballpoint pen works on paper.

Regarding the show, Kai and Sunny share, "The show embraces the concept of change; flowing deconstructed landscapes are continuously moving taking you from one place to another. Creating dynamic movement through line and color shifts representing a driving action or force. The lines in the works push and pull each other as if caught in a state of flux whilst other areas are free and exude speed and energy. The process is a methodical building of thin intricate lines upon each other. The result showing powerful kinetic compositions while a delicacy remains. The lines can change your perception of the shape while the foreground and background invite you to float in-between the two."

In conjunction with the exhibition, Kai and Sunny have collaborated with Element Skateboards on a set of new skate decks and they'll be releasing a limited-edition seven color silkscreen print (available to purchase at CHG on opening night); plus the duo will be painting two murals while they're visiting Southern California for the opening (9/21). The first mural will be painted just before the opening at Element Skateboards HQ in Huntington Beach and the second larger mural will be painted just after the opening at The Berrics, the downtown Los Angeles-based skatepark owned by Steve Berra and Eric Koston. The artwork depicted on both murals will be featured in the duo's In the Drift show. 

In the Drift opens Saturday, September 21st from 7pm-11pm in the Gallery 3, alongside a solo show from Ian Francis, entitled The Call of the Void, in the Main Gallery and a two-artist show with Jillian Evelyn and Kristen Liu-Wong, entitled Not a Flower Alone, in Gallery 2. Corey Helford Gallery is located at 571 S. Anderson St. Los Angeles, CA 90033 and normal hours are Tuesday – Saturday, from 12pm - 6pm.

About Kai and Sunny:

Kai and Sunny (born 1975 and 1977, respectively) are a UK based artist duo. They both graduated from the Epsom School of Art in Surrey, United Kingdom with degrees in Art and Design. They have collaborated with author David Mitchell, designer Alexander McQueen, artist Shepard Fairey and have won numerous accolades, including a 2012 D&AD Design Award and a 2015 LIA award. Works by Kai and Sunny have been exhibited internationally at institutions such as Haunch of Venison and are included in the Victoria & Albert Museum Print Archive Collection.

 

"The idea that such sophisticated and detailed pieces are executed by hand is mind-blowing."

– Shepard Fairey

 

"The highly acclaimed, award-winning art duo Kai and Sunny have risen to notoriety over the past few years thanks to their beautiful and highly-detailed nature-inspired images."

– Hypebeast

 

About Corey Helford Gallery:

Corey Helford Gallery (CHG) was first established in 2006 by Jan Corey Helford and her husband, television producer and creator, Bruce Helford (The ConnersAnger ManagementThe Drew Carey ShowGeorge Lopez) and has since evolved into one of the premier galleries of New Contemporary art. Its goals as an institution are the support and growth of young and emerging, to well-known and internationally established artists. 

CHG represents a diverse collection of international artists, primarily influenced by today’s pop culture and collectively encompassing style genres such as New Figurative Art, Pop Surrealism, Neo Pop, Graffiti and Street Art. CHG is located in Downtown Los Angeles in a robust 12,000 square foot building presenting new exhibitions approximately every six weeks.

For more info and an upcoming exhibition schedule, visit CoreyHelfordGallery.com and connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

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Vibrant Imagined Landscaped by Drica Lobo
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Drica Lobo is an artist whose work captures happiness and vibrant strokes. Drica’s fascination with art began as a small child. She was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, moved to the United States in 2003, and made Hermosa Beach, CA her home in 2007. Largely self- taught, Lobo has taken several painting classes during 15 years where she has studied with celebrated artists including Jose Ismael and Lisa Schultz. She completed her Master of Communications Degree at the University of Guarulhos, Sao Paulo in 2001.

 

Her paintings establish a link between the landscape’s reality and that imagined by its conceiver. These works focus on concrete questions that determine our existence. By examining the ambiguity and origination via retakes and variations, she investigates the dynamics of landscape, including the manipulation of its effects and the limits of spectacle based on our assumptions of what landscape means to us. Rather than presenting a factual reality, an illusion is fabricated to conjure the realms of our imagination.

 

The artist can easily imagine an own interpretation without being hindered by the historical reality.

 

Drica Lobo currently lives and works in Hermosa Beach. Her work is included in public and private collections around the world, including Brazil, United States, Singapore, and China. She is a member of South Bay Artist Collective (HBCA) and Foundation of Local Arts (FOLA) in California.

 

‘I paint colorfully to show the world the positive influence of colors and the power of strokes, creating an imaginary scenario based on nature and freedom state of mind. Art is limitless and I'm committed to making the viewer closer to his heart, manipulating shapes and feelings through the selection and composition of color. More than anything, my paintings are feelings as much as they are imaginary. I recognize the value in self-expression, so I find a way to let my inner self be expressed on the outside. Colors are feelings, and it can also be possibilities.’

Small Sculptures by Kelly Sheppard Murray
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Kelly Sheppard Murray is a Raleigh, North Carolina artist, educator, and designer with BFA, and MFA degrees from UNCG and ECU respectively. Murray’s career as an artist has emphasized three-dimensional design and fabrication for nature, health, science, and history museums, although her personal practice includes a wide array of media and processes. 

 

While maintaining a professional practice in design and fine arts, Murray teaches 2D & 3D design, painting, sculpture, and art appreciation at Wake Technical Community College. In 2014, Murray was awarded faculty rank as Associate Professor at Wake Technical Community College 

 

Murray is a 2018 recipient of the International Encaustic Artists Emerging Artist Grant. Other recognitions include being selected as a 2016 the Artspace Regional Emerging Artist in Residence, as well as a 2000 and 2012 recipient of Regional Artist Project Grant by the United Arts of Raleigh and Wake County. She now maintains a tenant studio at Artspace in order to be able to continue sharing work and having a conversation with the public. 

 

Recent exhibitions include a solo exhibition Kelly Sheppard Murray: Sculptures at Wilma Daniels Gallery, Wilmington, NC; Knoxville Tennessee’s Dogwood Arts 2018 Regional Arts Exhibition, Raleigh Fine Arts Society’s 2018 North Carolina Artists Exhibition, Artspace’s 30th Anniversary Retrospective Juried Exhibition.

 

 

Statement

 

Guided by the idea that consistent small actions create significant impact, I create small sculptures to allow my own daily actions to grow the body of work over time. This process of creating over a year or months is meant to also tie to the notion that our small actions affect the world beyond us. I encase, cover, stitch or layer found, industrial, cast-off or surplus materials to create objects or images that are not easily identified as natural or man-made. The pieces are made in a somewhat without plan or design but instead rely on a tactile knowledge and personal vocabulary built over a lifetime. I don’t plan these pieces but respond intuitively to materials and the forms. This process provides me the opportunity to discover something that I may not have otherwise imagined. 

In our slick, digitally saturated lives, I believe we need to be reminded of the living breathing tactile world that surrounds us.  My color choices are may be connected to nature while the forms remain ambiguous and non-specific but hold a hint of familiarity. 

I draw from the shapes of plants, moss, lichen, fungi, geological forms, and seashells. Because I am interested in how human behavior alters natural or man-made forms and spaces, I often place the irregular nature-inspired shapes in relation to grids, geometric structures, and repetitive patterns to try to consider the relationship between contrasting and sometimes conflicting forces. Combining and considering the similarities or differences in these shapes and forms allows me to deal with the intertwined relationship of human activity with nature.

Interview: Susan Lerner
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After a career as a Flavor Chemist, and as a mother of two, I was longing for an outlet to express myself and relieve the anxiety of caring for an aging parent with dementia.  On a whim, I took a collage class at the 92 Street Y in NYC and the minute I picked up a straight edge, I fell in love with the medium.  In a short four years, I have had the opportunity to exhibit my work in over 20 group shows, including Brooklyn, NY; Chelsea, NY; Edinburgh, Scotland and Rennebu, Norway and have had solo exhibits in New York City and Northwestern Connecticut. My work has been published in numerous art magazines and in the newly released book “Collage By Women:  50 Essential Contemporary Artists”. In 2018, I organized and curated, @the_collage_garden NYC, an installation in the 6BC Botanical Garden in the East Village, that showcased collages submitted by artists from over 25 countries.  I am currently a member of the instagram group, @thecollageclub, an exclusive group of collage artists who collage the same page of the same book each week. My most notable sale is to restauranteur David Bouley.

You can find me on Instagram @mixdmediamashup

Select pieces of work available on www.saatchiart.com/susanlerner

https://www.mixdmediamashup.com/

You discovered your love for collage at a time when you were in search for a creative outlet. How has your relationship with the medium progressed since then?

 I discovered collage as a creative outlet from everyday stressors, including taking care of a parent with dementia.  Since that time, it has turned into an absolute passion. I work on some aspect of collage almost daily.  Technically, I began with photomontage, using my own photographs, but gradually developed into a style using vintage imagery and maps. I have recently experimented with 3-D collage and continue to explore new ways to learn about the medium and myself. 

Can you expand on your process for us? How do you curate the images you collage?

My artistic journey is the process.  I source vintage material by scouring flea markets and garage sales.  I hunt for imagery in the viewfinder of my camera. I usually have an idea that I want to work on based off of one or two pieces of found imagery and go from there.  Everything is hand-cut, layered and glued. It can get pretty messy but I try to sort out cuttings into categories and file them into envelopes. However, the chaos makes it interesting. I never know what I will find or create.

 

How long do you typically spend on a collage? Is there a preliminary stage?

I like to work on numerous collages at the same time so I can't quantify how long it takes. I usually have an idea in my head based on one or two images and then use material I’ve already cut out to free-play and create.  If I get stuck, I move onto the next collage and go back to it later. This keeps it fresh and exciting. After everything is laid out for a collage, I take a photo. The trickiest part is to recreate the collage during the gluing process.  If I make a mistake, it’s over because I only use original papers, no photocopies. I like that the material is precious and one of a kind. Once it’s used, it’s gone.

Your most recent series “All Over the Map” utilizes vintage maps. Can you share more with us about your choice to use maps?

The series “All Over the Map” developed from a love of cartography and travel.  I had been wanting to incorporate maps within my collages since I started collaging.  The maps are all about the connection to my past both literally and metaphorically. Maps were used before GPS was invented so they bring me back to my childhood of planning and taking trips with my family and hand cutting the images takes me back in time before computers and photoshop were a fact of life.    I try to juxtapose images so the impossible seems possible. The process is both mediative and stimulating at the same time.

 

Do you have a piece of advice you have received that you would like to pass along to our readers?

My advice is to just go for it.  Put yourself out there and take a chance.  There is really no downside to exploring your creativity and sharing it with the world.  You may even surprise yourself.

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Collage/Found Imagery and Painting by Sarah Perkins
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Since studying at Chelsea School of Art and Central St Martins, I have been working successfully and internationally as a freelance illustrator for twenty-five years. My commissions cover literary fiction, classics, popular fiction, and gift books as well as editorial and design.

All my images are a mixture of collage/found imagery and my own painting. My influences are eclectic: found objects, textures, and pictures; folklore; rites and customs; the natural world; places I have been.

www.instagram.com/sarahperkinsillustration/

Studio Sunday: Karen Navarro
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Our Studio Sunday interview this week highlights the work of photographer Karen Navarro. Learn more about what inspires her colorful, figurative images, her creative process, and the motto that keeps her going in tough times! You can also view two of Karen’s works in ‘Faces & Figures’, a group exhibition presented by PxP Contemporary.

Bio

With a background in fashion design, Argentina-born artist, Karen Navarro, works with a highly stylized aesthetic in a diverse array of mediums that includes photography, collage, and sculpture. Her constructed portraits, as she describes it herself, are known for the use of color theory, surreal scenes and minimalist details. Navarro’s work expresses self-referential questions that connect in a much larger scale to ideas of construction of identity, societal expectations and the understanding of the being; prompting a discourse about the subconscious will to comply with the contemporary societies' canons when these are in fact misleading. Similarly, Navarro explores in her work femininity as a cultural construct.

Navarro has lived in Houston since 2014 where she completed the certificate program in photography at the Houston Center for Photography. In 2018, Navarro was awarded a scholarship at the Glassell School of Art | The Museum of Fine Art Houston where she studied analog photography. Most recently, she received the Artadia fellowship in 2019.

Navarro's work has been exhibited in the US and abroad. Her most recent shows include ones at the Elisabet Ney Museum in Austin, TX (2019), Presa House Gallery in San Antonio, TX (2019), Melkweg in Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2019), Museo de la Reconquista in Tigre, Argentina (2018), The Union in Houston, TX (2018), and Houston Center for Photography in Houston, TX (2018).

Statement

Driven by an insatiable curiosity about understanding the self and the resulting human behaviors shaped by social norms. Furthermore, understanding the role of social norms in the construction of personal and social identity, my work seeks answers and proposes questions that may not yet have a predetermined answer.


Through the use of color theory, surreal scenes and minimalist details, the constructed portraits, as I like to call them, recreate a character that usually doesn’t have an identity. My photo process blurs those lines of identity by disguising, hiding and covering the faces. In the performative photographs, often times, the characters are isolated in a serene environment. I believe photography allows me the expression of self-referential questions. By expressing personal worries, my work appeals to connect these ideas to a much larger scale of ideas of construction of identity, societal expectations and the understanding of the being; prompting a discourse about the subconscious will to comply with the contemporary societies' canons when these are in fact misleading.

When did you first become interested in art? 

I first became interested in art while doing a photography assignment for an art class in high school. But I would say that I grew up surrounded by an artistic environment, my grandmother was a dressmaker and my grandfather, who I didn't get the chance to meet, liked to draw. I remember spending my childhood days with my grandmother in her atelier. And, I think that was what led me to study fashion design and then photography. My fashion design training had a strong art program. I gained a general overview of art and history but it wasn't until I came to Houston that I started to get more interested in the contemporary art world and the art scene.


Tell us about what inspires you creatively.

My inspiration comes from different sources. Color, lighting and shadow from the everyday can inspire a mood. I usually use these moods to approach new artwork and link it to philosophical ideas, self-referential questions, or something else in what I believe in and I want to share. Looking at artwork and specially from the Surrealist, Renaissance and Cubist periods brings a lot of inspiration. I'm interested in the concept of identity so I explore it in many different ways. Photography for me is about creating conversations, making relevant a topic that may be only relevant for me. It's about inviting people to question along with me. My work doesn't offer answers because I don't believe in absolute truths. And, in the in-between of this dichotomy of not believing in absolute truths and having an opinion at the same time is where I position myself every time I approach a new body of work. Inviting you, seducing you through a highly stylized image to reflect on topics that may challenge our social notions.

What is your process like?  

Usually, everything starts on the sketchbook, then I pay a visit to the warehouse to buy some painting to paint the backdrop wall. After that I go to the thrift store to get some clothing and some props to prepare for the photo shoot. In my performative photographs I create characters, for this reason I meticulously arrange the elements in the scene. Although, while in the photo shoots I allow myself to get creative and try new things, I don't stick entirely to the sketchbook. 

Since my work is evolving and I am working on new mediums, like collages and soon sculpture, my process changes according to the work I am doing. For example in my last series of collages "El Pertenecer en Tiempos Modernos"  I added laser-cutting, 3-D printing, and embossing.


Describe your current studio space. What is most important about it or one thing that you can’t live without in your work area?

I like to call my studio ‘big white box’. I love the high ceilings and how airy it is. Natural lighting is something I can't live without. My studio has small window that faces the top of a tree. I enjoy looking at the the wind blowing the tree with the sky on the background. During the mornings the sunlight is very beautiful. For me, my studio is my sacred temple, everything has to be in order and be very minimal for me to be able to concentrate.

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What is one piece of advice that has stuck with you or a quote that you think is especially meaningful?

My motto is from a Spanish saying, Persevera y triufarás, which translated literally into the English language means Persevere and you will Triumph. If at first you don't succeed, try and try again. 

Are there any exciting exhibitions, projects, or collaborations going on this year that you’re currently working on or will be soon?

Yes! There are two things I‘m very excited to share. I'm currently working on some sculptures that explore the notion of body and beauty. It’s an extension of my body of work “Soft Objects”. I’m currently at the first stage, but am very excited about it!

I’m also organizing and co-curating a show called “Alternate Pathways”. The show celebrates Houston’s cultural diversity and has received a grant from the city. The show opens on October 19th 6-8 PM at 2315 Union St, Houston, TX 77007⁣⁣. 

Not a Flower Alone By Kristen Liu-Wong and Jillian Evelyn

 

CHG

Corey Helford Gallery

Presents
Not a Flower Alone
By Kristen Liu-Wong and Jillian Evelyn

 

OPENING RECEPTION

September 21, 2019 | 7pm - 11pm

 

ON VIEW

September 21 – October 26, 2019

 

COREY HELFORD GALLERY

571 S. Anderson St. Los Angeles, CA 90033

Open Tuesday-Saturday, 12pm - 6pm

(310) 287-2340

 

 

Downtown Los Angeles’ Corey Helford Gallery is proud to announce a two-artist show with Jillian Evelyn and Kristen Liu-Wong. Opening Saturday, September 21st in Gallery 2Not a Flower Alone features new works from the two Los Angeles-based artists that attempt to reflect the human experience utilizing flowers.

 

Using candy colors, heavy patterning, and tight compositions, Lui-Wong draws inspiration from American folk art, cartoons she watched as a kid, architecture, and for Not a Flower Alonefloriography (language of flowers).

 

Liu-Wong shares, "In this show I’m using floriography as a launching point to explore instances of what makes us human and humanity’s emotional connection to the natural world, drawing on flowers to say what can not necessarily be spoken or expressed out loud. The language of flowers is an old one who’s various forms can be found throughout time and in every culture -- by using this unspoken and cryptic language, moments of friendship, grief, rage, sensuality, and isolation are communicated and emphasized. Flowers are used as an expression of self; in them we see reflected back all of our best and worst qualities, in them we see our own fragility and vulnerabilities, our hardiness, the enduring nature of life itself, and the inevitability of death. My work draws heavily upon both Eastern and Western symbolism, referencing childhood cartoons, Victorian mourning culture, Japanese shunga, Greek mythology and a multitude of other sources to create a universe that mirrors both the diversity in our world and the unifying nature of our collective experience."

 

Evelyn’s instantly recognizable paintings feature abstracted figures bathed in vibrant colors. Regarding Not a Flower Alone, she states, "Throughout art history, whether fine art or theater, flowers denote emotions in flux. Whether these emotions are grief, rebirth, death or even a simple gesture of unrequited love, flowers can be used as transitory depictions of sadness or powerful symbols of beauty. They are undeniably used as hints by both authors and artists. This newest series of works uses flowers as a means to convey an artist reexamining process and practice, and the confidence and painstaking personal examination that comes with re-engaging with the art-making process. My figures are solitary and powerful, pondering and inquisitive, shaped by a quiet exploration of actions and consequences. The bodies contort and angle themselves as if a new un-ventured pose will beget new connections with the self. The flowers serve as a reminder that life deserves questioning, moments where words and definitions cannot be applied to the complications of emotions. Daisies may represent innocence, and roses love, but my works strip themselves extraneous allusions and lay bare the power of solitary self-introspection."

 

Not a Flower Alone opens Saturday, September 21st in Gallery 2, alongside a solo show from Ian Francis, entitled The Call of the Void, in the Main Gallery and a solo exhibition from Kai and Sunny, entitled In the Drift, in Gallery 3CoreyHelford Gallery is located at 571 S. Anderson St. Los Angeles, CA 90033 and normal hours are Tuesday – Saturday, from 12pm - 6pm.

 

 

About Kristen Liu-Wong:

Kristen Liu-Wong is a Los Angeles-based artist from San Francisco, who studied Illustration at Pratt Institute. Since graduating in 2013, she has shown extensively in numerous galleries on the East and West coasts and some places in between and beyond.

 

Liu-Wong's work blends everyday occurrences from her life with abstracted nightmares and crude humor. Trained as an illustrator, she tries to tell a story with every piece she makes, developing a personal and slightly sinister narrative within each painting. Using candy colors, heavy patterning, and tight compositions, the work draws inspiration from American folk art, the cartoons she watched as a kid, Shunga (Japanese term for erotic art), and her appreciation for architecture. She is always striving to make work that is highly personal but altered enough to allow individual interpretations to be applied to every story she paints.

 

About Jillian Evelyn:

Jillian Evelyn is a Los Angeles-based artist from Michigan. Evelyn's paintings investigate the depths of awkwardness, discomfort, and contortion both from external expectations and within ones' own thoughts. Evelyn paints her figures and abstractions bathed in vibrant color. She is able to reflect her personal conflicts while allowing for the viewer's personal interpretations.

 

About Corey Helford Gallery:

Corey Helford Gallery (CHG) was first established in 2006 by Jan Corey Helford and her husband, television producer and creator, Bruce Helford (The ConnersAnger ManagementThe Drew Carey ShowGeorge Lopez) and has since evolved into one of the premier galleries of New Contemporary art. Its goals as an institution are the support and growth of young and emerging, to well-known and internationally established artists.

 

CHG represents a diverse collection of international artists, primarily influenced by today’s pop culture and collectively encompassing style genres such as New Figurative Art, Pop Surrealism, Neo Pop, Graffiti and Street Art. CHG is located in Downtown Los Angeles in a robust 12,000 square foot building presenting new exhibitions approximately every six weeks.

 

For more info and an upcoming exhibition schedule, visit CoreyHelfordGallery.com and connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

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Minimal Mixed Media Work by Imani Pierre
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Imani Pierre is a minimal mixed media artist born in Jamaica, currently living in Maryland. Full time, she is a retail manager and buyer for an independent clothing boutique. In 2012, she began experimenting with painting and scraps of paper, adding collage elements to please her tactile nature. From there, she has enjoyed creating art for her home, exhibitions, and desired commissions. Having always had an interest in design and fashion, she is a self-taught visual artist, finding pleasure in the geometric arrangement of repurposed materials, complimenting the use of vibrant and soothing color choices. Imani’s evolution in mixed media painting, allow her to extend the range of her talents and a keen eye for styling and designing even further.  From styling a wide range of customers to styling her personal works of art – Imani’s art captures the expressive composition and playfulness in blending materials, patterns, and colors.

 

Statement

 

I am a minimal mixed media artist, creating what I feel is pleasing to the eye, and therapeutic to the soul. Inspired by nature with bold colors and subtle touches of calm tones, I find that my work visually stimulates your gaze and slows down your pace towards peace. From the neutrals in soil, bark, and branches, to the irresistibility seen all around us in petals and in the sky; I release my visual inspirations and fascinations into my craft, mirroring what I find withhold a timeless, memorable and colorful energy. As I create, I repurpose materials, and practice the concept of up-cycling by finding different ways to incorporate old bubble wrap, tape, sticks, flowers, papers, and even Chinese food menus! I enjoy experimenting along the lines of mending simplicity with tactile dimensions and expressing through abstract.

Drawing Characters from Everyday Life | Interview with Johana Kroft

Interview by Sarah Mills

Johana Kroft is an illustrator and designer coming from the Czech Republic. After living in London and establishing a studio Idea & Maker with her husband she is now working worldwide. Together they collaborate at a broad spectrum of fields varying from experience, entertainment, advertisement and technology. They bring unique visuals in the form of thoughtful craft and storytelling.

Interpreting her minimalistic style in both 2D and 3D worlds in various styles and techniques. Creating illustrations and motion design videos. Her personal work is elegant and poetic. Inspired by travelling, dogs and emotions.

www.johanakroft.com

On your website, you talk about your love of creating characters and the inspiration you take from your dog Panda. Can you tell us more about your characters and what goes into creating them?

I usually imagine an everyday situation that people know and can relate to. It could be sad, funny, melancholic, or romantic. And most of the time it's more than just one feeling.

I had always drawn characters as dogs or cats, even when I was a kid. My dog is a huge drama queen, and a lot is happening in her life. I'm trying to catch her feelings and situations and share them with people. She makes us happy every day, and I want to keep her character alive forever with my work. A mix breed of Parson Russell, sausage dog and maybe Whippet. That is unstoppable, smart, and scared of everything, a combination of feelings. She is very special.

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You have a very specific color, palette. Is there a reason behind your color choices?

I don't. I always start from scratch with every project, because different colors have a different feeling. I see what works and I build on that, keeping it minimalistic. I think a lot of color combinations come from traveling to a foreign country, but you can go to another city, neighboorhood or a street.

Of course, there is a lot of practice to it. Back in the days when I started with design, I didn't have an idea of how to combine the colors. Pinterest is a great source of inspiration. I use it for creating mood-boards. I look at old paintings from masters like Mattise, Paul Klee, Kandinsky or Picasso. One of the exhibitions I saw recently was by Lee Krasner, and I was incredible as I'm in love with abstract paintings. She is definitely a huge inspiration for me.

Another inspiration is Japanese culture – a minimalistic and very clean style with beautiful shapes. One book that I would recommend is A Dictionary of Color Combinations and one more that I like because of colors is Made in North Korea by Nick Bonner. You can explore many beautiful color palettes in books. I'm always looking for palettes that are unfamiliar to me and that I've never seen before. That's what inspires me.

Along with your personal work, you co-founded a studio. What inspired you to begin Idea & Maker?

Ever since my husband and I met, we'd had this idea to start a studio. We have always felt that our skills matched. He is more technical and likes precision, symmetry, and his decisions are based on reason. My decisions are based on feelings, and my work is emotional, colorful, and asymmetrical. But at the same time, we like the same stuff, such as nature, art, design, architecture, traveling, technology, animals, books, movies, etc. We are like 2 hemispheres of one brain haha!

Both of us worked together now and then on a few projects as freelancers, and it worked, so it just made sense to start a studio together, which was possible in London. We decided to make a website and take it very seriously.

Our first project was a 1-second long product video for Coco&Eve, which is a fantastic hair mask. And it was beautiful to work on a product that we also believe in. On top of that, the people were very cool, and we were given a lot of freedom. The project was very successful. We were featured on Behance and got more opportunities because of it. Watch the video here: https://ideaandmaker.com/cocoandeve

What we like to do is practice our craft on personal projects. We are playing with a combination of 2d and 3d animation. That's something we love. We also collaborate with other productions and agencies. We have an amazing relationship with Unit9. We helped them with a very cool project for Google. And we are very proud of it! We are a small studio, but because of our diversity of skills, we can execute more complicated briefs.

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On Idea & Maker's home page it says, "we craft stories," can you tell us more about your role as a storyteller and creator?

I am not the biggest fan of making roles in the studio. I have a feeling that anyone can be anything if he/she wants. Especially in the creative industry. I started as a designer - after a few years, I wondered if I could be an illustrator, art director, or maybe storyteller. My husband started as a designer, he was doing a little bit of illustration, UX/UI, he switched to motion design, then freelancing as a 3D generalist and now he's building his setups in Houdini. As a studio, we are always switching roles. I can be a producer, art director, designer, motion designer, illustrator, modeler, and storyboard artist in one day. I do everything from an idea to making it. It is all about learning something new every day, and I like that a lot!

We are always excited to approach a brief in a way we feel is right, and because we know how things are made, we can see where difficulties may occur. With that in mind, our building blocks are more stable, and we don't have any issues when it comes to production. 'We craft stories' means that we do everything from beginning to end, and the message or story is not lost somewhere in the middle.

What is currently a source of inspiration for you?

We go to galleries a lot! London's got the best exhibitions in Tate Modern and Saatchi Gallery. There is always something that pushes you or inspires you on the next level when you are open to new experiences. I'm reading Brief Answers to the Big Questions by Stephen Hawkings at the moment, and it's definitely something that inspires me a lot. I'm also motivated by talks. Seeing people's hard work is very important to me.

We have decided to move out of London for a little while and explore the world, so I am totally excited about what the future brings. We want to meet people from different countries and cultures. I love new stories and new beginnings. I have never been scared to start something new when I feel uninspired. The last few years I have only lived in cities, and while there are many new impulses, it can sometimes feel like too many. Now I have a feeling that we need to absorb that, explore a bit of nature, and find a new beautiful.

Realistic Paintings Utilizing Projection by Hali Pollard
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Hali Pollard is a recent graduate from Stetson University with her Bachelor's of Art in Studio Art and Communication and Media Studies. Her work has been exhibited in Stetson's 28th and 29th Annual Juried Undergraduate Art Show in 2017 and 2018, where she won the Friends of Art Purchase Award. 

 

Hali presented her Senior Studio Art Thesis Exhibition, Layers, at Stetson University's Student Showcase, where she was awarded the Maris Award Runner-Up. Her piece "Here's a sign," from her exhibition won the Ann Hall Award and now belongs to Stetson University's permanent collection. There are currently two pieces of Hali's that now belong to the permanent collection.

 

Her work aims to elevate the darker side of romantic relationships and associated feelings using projections of light, color, and text. She utilizes the element of projection and dramatic lighting to create layers of meaning on her subjects. Using realistic methods of painting, Hali creates loosely written narratives that come across as familiar but undoubtedly leave questions unanswered.

Interview with Moniker Art Fair highlight artist Andrew Hem
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In advance of Moniker Art Fair coming up on October 2 - 6, Create! Magazine caught up with painter Andrew Hem, who will be exhibiting at the show. Read his interview below!

Raised as the child of Cambodian immigrants in Los Angeles, Andrew Hem’s illustrative paintings bridge disparate aesthetic influences as well as cultural touchstones and sensibilities. Hem’s paintings typically highlight an individual within a group of figures, homing in on the one person who is often somberly staring out from the canvas. Using a cool palette in which the colors do not quite match up with the real world, the artist creates somber moods in illusionistic spaces set at a remove from reality. Although his color scheme—with its supernatural rendering of the natural world—elicits comparisons to impressionism, Hem also echoes graffiti art based on his straightforward and illustrative rendering of figures and space, as well as allusions to street culture, art, and fashion.

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How and when did you first become interested in art?

I became interested in art around 12 years old through graffiti. I feel like most kids who grew up in the 80s in my neighborhood had a similar start.

Tell us about what inspires you creatively.

Great designs inspire me so much - whether it be architecture, fashion, or interior design. I love color combinations. I get inspired by all the different color combos I could achieve if I had more time in the day.

What is your process like?

I start with an idea in my head. I would then do some rough sketches to plan out the composition. From there, I would shoot some references. I like to add a 50/50 blend of reference and Imagination. Before, I would do all imagination and found that I tended to repeat myself. And when I used all references it would tend to be too stiff for my liking. The 50/50 was the perfect look I was aiming for.

Describe your current studio space. What is most important about it or one thing that you can't live without in your work area?

My studio is my garage and I love it. I use to have a separate studio but spending the money to transform my garage was the nest decision I could’ve made. I have a tv in that I probably couldn’t work without. I work while listening to movies so Netflix is playing all the time in my studio.

What is one piece of advice that has stuck with you or a quote that you find meaningful?

You are going to need a Coretta Scott to be king.

Can you share a bit about what you will be exhibiting at Moniker and what viewers can look forward to?

Most people think that an artist is born with talent. They don’t really know the hard work and time spent perfecting the craft. I wanted to showcase the moment rarely seen. We see the end result and assume how talented that artist is. With this new body of work you will get a glimpse of the backdoor.

Abstract Paintings by Fraser Radford
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Fraser Radford was born in 1987 in Brockville, Ontario. He holds an Honours Bachelor of Arts in Art History, with a minor in Religious Studies (graduated in 2009) from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, a Fine Arts diploma from St. Lawrence College in Brockville, Ontario (2014), and a post-graduate certificate in Studio Process Advancement from the Haliburton School of the Arts (2014). He has held numerous volunteer and paid positions at galleries and museums in Kingston, Toronto, and Brockville. He has apprenticed with Shayne Dark, one of Canada's prominent sculptors based out of Kingston, Ontario.

 

Numerous galleries across Ontario represent his work. His work is held in multiple private collections in Canada, the U.S., the U.K., France, Australia, and New Zealand, and has been exhibited across North America. His work has also been published in several magazines in Canada, and the U.S, as well as The Peace Project, a catalog produced by Gallery 9 in Culver City, California in 2010.