Interview with Moniker Art Fair highlight artist Sergio Garcia

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We were so excited to learn more about Sergio Garcia, a highlight artist for the upcoming Moniker Art Fair in London! Sergio is a Cuban-American artist, a sculptor and a painter who uses art as a means for exploring his personal identity, both past and present, within the context of the ever-present human condition and the socio-political environment. Read his interview below to know how he got started in art, what he will be presenting at the fair, and the other big projects he has coming up this year!

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Tell us about your background and how you became interested in art?

My father’s side of the family is from Mexico and my mother’s side is from Texas. I grew up in Dallas, Texas. Growing up I read a lot of Bloom County comic strips and listened to a lot of Iron Maiden and ZZ Top. I started drawing a lot of album covers on book covers at school. Eventually, I slowly started getting into graffiti and skateboarding. The skateboarding culture really influenced me and my work today. As I got older I learned to airbrush and started airbrushing cars and motorcycles. Then that slowly led me into doing contemporary art. I still paint motorcycles every now and then.

You use words like unconventional and unorthodox when discussing your work. Can you describe in what ways your work can be seen as pushing past traditional boundaries and what effect you hope to achieve by doing this?

I guess the main reason would be the types of materials I use. Most of my work is done in automotive paint. I also use a wide range of material like; blown glass, plastic, resin, fiberglass. All with automotive clear float finishes. I guess another thing would be that I don’t have one set way of making my sculptures. I experiment with all types of products to achieve the best look possible.

Tell us about your most interesting project or favorite piece that you've made?

Believe it or not it’s the ones for the moniker art fair. Probably the OJ II WHEEL. Seeing that one come to life brings back a lot of memories and excitement. I think a lot of my work ties to youthfulness and this one hits home the hardest.

How does your process work? Do you do a lot of research and sketching or create art more intuitively? How long does one piece take and do you work on series separately or simultaneously?

I do a lot of research beforehand. I think about every option and I even try samples of materials that I think would work best. I try to have everything thought out before I attempt it. Some series I think about for years before attempting. Sometimes I’ll make a piece and then assembly line the rest. Other times I go all in and change things as I go.

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What can we look forward to from you at Moniker Art Fair?

I’m doing a new series that I’ve kept under wraps of oversized hyper-realistic skateboard wheels. I’m really excited about this series. I’ve been wanting to make them for a while. Moniker offered me a spotlight series which gave me the freedom to pull it off. The group of work is called “It’s the little things”. Skateboarding culture is kind of what got me into doing art in the first place. A lot of the styles, graphics, colors, and thing from the 80s and 90s struck a chord with me. It still does to this day. So it’s nice to pay homage to that. I hope the viewers are just as excited as I am.

Are there any other exciting projects, collaborations or exhibitions for the rest of the year that you'd like to share?

We have Miami in December, which is Art Basel. I’ll be showing with Thinkspace. That’s always my favorite time of the year. Other than that, I have a few mural projects in the works.

By Alicia Puig