Second Chances: Podcast Interview with Michael Kalmbach, Artist and the Director of The Creative Vision Factory
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Have you ever felt disappointed in the course of your art career and even doubted your journey? On this episode, Michael Kalmbach shares his story of overcoming addiction, navigating his own art career and using parts of his story and life experiences to serve the community. 

www.michaelkalmbach.com

www.thecreativevisionfactory.org

About Michael

Michael Kalmbach received his MFA at the University of Delaware in 2008. Shortly after graduation he accepted a position at the Delaware College of Art & Design, and founded the New Wilmington Art Association, an organization that organized exhibitions of contemporary art in Wilmington’s vacant retail spaces from August 2008 to April 2013. This work led to Michael’s involvement with the Chris White Community Development Corporation, which developed the 23-unit artist live/work space, Shipley Lofts. Kalmbach served the CWCDC as Board Chairman from 2013-2016. In June 2011 he accepted a contract with the State’s Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health to develop and direct an art program in downtown Wilmington. The Creative Vision Factory has been open since December of 2011, and fosters the creative potential of individuals on the behavioral health spectrum in a studio art environment that cultivates integration with the community through a program of exhibitions, workshops, and communal work space

Creative Vision Factory

The Creative Vision Factory opened its doors in December of 2011. Funded by the State of Delaware’s Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, it is one of several peer-run programs incubated by the sweeping reform of Delaware’s greater mental health system. The Creative Vision Factory is on a path to 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. As a peer-run nonprofit agency, the Factory will be uniquely situated to serve the community, in the heart of an arts and cultural district, that sees the behavioral health population as a genuine partner in the development of a more creative and just City of Wilmington.

Aly Morgan
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Led purely by a natural sense of curiosity, Aly Morgan follows each spark of inspiration until it leads to a new discovery - either about herself, the world or her place within it. Although she prefers to work with acrylic paint and newsprint, inspiration has led her to try many unconventional materials in the journey of finding her creative voice. Her early works were heavily influenced by her days as a jewelry designer and were created using items such as wire, fine silver and found objects. Now specializing in hand painted and found paper collage, she works intuitively to create compelling combinations of shapes and color to convey stories of self-discovery. As a self-taught artist, she has explored expressing her ideas for many years using different mediums but has focused the last 6 months on unraveling her own personal definition of art. In doing so, she has created a large body of work that reflects not only her current inspirations but also explores themes such as womanhood, connection, and language. Her most recent series, Native Tongue, explores the relationship between an artist and what inspires them as well as celebrates the translation of that inspiration into one’s work. By using her literal inspirations to create abstract characters, she is continually building a language in which the forms are all at once familiar yet foreign, while challenging the viewer to seek their own interpretation.

Statement

Inspiration is everything to me. It is what motivates me, leads my creative process and ultimately, what nourishes my soul. A concept that is the cornerstone in creating my personal work is what I call “following the golden thread”. To me, it simply means following a spark of inspiration to see where it leads.

Having lived most of my life believing that art was simply paintings that hung in museums, it wasn’t until I was introduced to mixed-media art 12 years ago, that I learned differently. Once I discovered that art was not just for long ago masters to create, I was compelled to seek my own definition of what art could be.

I am fascinated by color and what it can convey. I am continuously exploring ways to combine color and shape in order to translate a thought or feeling into a recognizable form. While I continue to explore various techniques, I am most drawn to creating my own collage material using acrylic paint and newsprint. Although they are humble materials, they allow me to create endless combinations of colors and shapes.

I am most inspired by finding beauty in unexpected places, so while my work is unapologetically feminine in color and themes, it is also heavily influenced by my love of long forgotten and neglected objects. I feel my most compelling pieces are ones that marry color with organic texture and invite the viewer to seek their own interpretation.


Writing About Art: Podcast Interview with Emily Steer, Elephant Magazine

Let's go behind the scenes of Elephant Magazine!

I have been a long time fan of Elephant and recently got the amazing opportunity to interview editor Emily Steer. Emily shares her personal story and talks about how she took an untraditional route to journalism, overcame imposter syndrome and eventually established herself as the editor of this leading art magazine.

This episode includes bonus tips for artists and gives insight into how contemporary art editors discover new talent.

Emily Steer, Photography by Hannah Miles

Emily Steer, Photography by Hannah Miles

Elephant West. Photography by Dirk Lindner

Elephant West. Photography by Dirk Lindner

Emily’s Artist Picks

Maisie Cousins

Maisie’s work is repulsive and seductive at the same time, a squidgy conglomeration of weird food and lots of oily liquid, with beautiful colour palettes including pops of electric blue, pale pink and minty green. It’s fun and celebratory—a glorious mess. Maisie was the first artist to show at Elephant West, and she created a wonderful environment that made the space feel so playful. She is a classic Elephant artist.

https://elephant.art/event/maisie-cousins-dipping-sauce/

Maisie Cousins

Maisie Cousins

 Ramona Zoladek

Ramona has just won the Elephant x Griffin Art Prize, and her work is a subtle balance of manmade and natural elements, with delicate pea shoots growing through the cracks. It is political work which draws its viewer in first and foremost through visual intrigue.  

https://elephant.art/life-hangs-urgently-balance-ramona-zoladeks-sculptures/

Ramona Zoladek

Ramona Zoladek

 Ben Sledsens

I have a (perhaps childish) love of animals in art, and I especially enjoy Ben’s work. His animals are wild but oddly regimented, made sleek and elegant in his working of them.

Ben Sledsens

Ben Sledsens

 Tristan Pigott

Tristan’s practice is really developing at the moment—he’s currently studying sculpture at the RCA and his dream-like paintings are currently getting even more of a hallucinatory edge. There’s something really languid and peaceful about them, even in their weirdness. 

Tristan Pigott

Tristan Pigott

 Anna Liber Lewis

Anna is the next solo artist to show at Elephant West, alongside the musician Four Tet, who she has known since childhood. Her paintings are lively and gutsy, and often sexual without being explicit. There’s a great energy to her work.

Anna Liber Lewis

Anna Liber Lewis

 Hun Kyu Kim

More animal paintings. Bunnies wearing umbrellas for hats, woodland pig parties and eyeballs drinking martinis; Hun Kyu Kim’s work is like Beatrix Potter on acid.

Hun Kyu Kim

Hun Kyu Kim

 

Robin Francis Williams

Robin created one of my favourite paintings at Frieze, depicting a crazed-looking woman combing her hair with a fork. Her work is bold and frenzied, and her depiction of light is stunning.

Robin Francis Williams

Robin Francis Williams

Elephant Magazine’s Manifesto

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Issue 13 Artists Announced

Congratulations to the artists selected for the Winter 2019 edition!

Guest Curator: Margaret Winslow, Curator of Contemporary Art, Delaware Art Museum

Margaret Winslow currently lives and works in Wilmington, Delaware where she is the Curator of Contemporary Art at the Delaware Art Museum. Margaret has curated for the Neuberger Museum of Art and The Delaware Contemporary and assisted with exhibits for the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. Her recent exhibitions at the Delaware Art Museum include Dream Streets: Art in Wilmington 1970–1990, Retro-Active: Performance Art from 1964–1987, Anne Truitt: Luminosities, and Once Upon a Time in Delaware: In Quest of the Perfect Book, the most recent installment of Nina Katchadourian’s Sorted Books project. In 2010, she attended Independent Curators International’s Curatorial Intensive in New York and in 2015, she served as juror for Art of the State: Pennsylvania at the State Museum of Pennsylvania. Margaret holds a B.A. in Art History from the University of Mary Washington and an M.A. in Modern and Contemporary Art, Theory, and Criticism from SUNY Purchase College.

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Selected Artists

Erin Holscher Almazan

Martin Beck

Marit Geraldine Bostad

Lael Burns

Soojin Choi

Sarah Flood-Baumann

Leslie Fry

Holly Gray

Claira Heitzenrater (featured image)

Nanci Hersh

Annette Hur

Hun Kyu Kim

Eunmi Kim

Jackie Leishman

Riccardo Liotta

Eric Lubrick

Catarina Mantero

Jenniffer Omaitz

Jihyun Ra

Ashleigh Raizes

James Razko

Michael Reedy

Valerie Rey

Jiela Rufeh

Kristen Sabatelli

Young Shin

Ashley Smith

Beth Solin

Marisa Veerman

Anthony Vega

Darko Vuckovic

Brittany Watkins

Fukuko Yahagi-Harris

Alex Youkanna

Carson Zullinger

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Sculpture Made Entirely out of Paint by Ignacio Muv
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This year, we had the pleasure of meeting artist Ignacio Muv at Scope Miami Beach and fell in love with his incredible sculptures created entirely out of paint! They are absolutely stunning in person. Here is what the artist has to say about his work and process:

My art is born from a process of transformation of the paint. I am interested in the constant change and movement of the human condition, and I materialize it through my art. I create skins of paintings, which I wait till they dry, then I fold them and give them life. I do not paint over canvas, it all paint. The fundament of my work its not material but spiritual. 

It is an analogy to the human body, where metaphorically the painting is the skin the beater is the skeleton and the work the spirit.
— Ignacio Muv

About The Artist

Ignacio Muv addresses the potential of painting as a material, his works present it from its tactile, sensory and virtual dimension; generating a direct dialogue between the painting, the frame and the canvas, suppressing the formal obligations in that relationship.

Muv elaborates his creations from pigments and emulsions. He uses materials to "cook" his painting through recipes whose results are, at times, unpredictable and subject to time and circumstances, always driven by an intention of a spiritual and mediative nature that articulates his process.

His practice is the extension of constant experimentation, pushing the limits of painting. The pigment is transformed into dust, powder becomes paint and the paint manifests as skin. The artist plays with the states of transformation of matter, where the understanding of art is born from its core, as an infinite matter in constant movement. Everything combines to form a work of art made of an instant and a time.

There is a strong element of paradox and balance in the work of Ignatius, because something so intrinsically material, so tangible and palpable, acquires a substantial spiritual and spatial dimension in unison. A very physical and at the same time very contemplative work, of frozen and organic movements full of silence and sound.

The constant ambition of the artist to inhabit the mystery of the meaning of art through material surfaces is facilitated by his practice, where he shows an ability to look beyond the painting, as if we could take off our own skin and see what is below . It is a vision of the state of constant transformation of the human condition and, simultaneously, a record of the now.

Max Cole 'Crosswinds" at Larry Becker Contemporary Art
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If you find yourself in Philadelphia before the end of the year, we highly suggest stopping by Larry Becker Contemporary Art to see their current exhibition. To be honest, it wasn’t yet on my radar when I decided to go gallery hopping on a Saturday in November. I happened to begin chatting with an artist sitting a co-op space nearby and he urged me to go over and take a look. ‘Crosswinds’ presents paintings and works on paper by American artist Max Cole. I won’t give away too much here since the owners are more than happy to tell you about this incredible artist and her work - so go see some great art and say hi to their adorable gallery cat!

Max Cole
’Crosswinds’
On view Nov 10 - Dec 29, 2018

You can follow the gallery on Facebook & Instagram.

Max Cole’s paintings suggest an approach to infinity through the use of vertical repetitive lines, a record of intense focus that is said to contain energy as embedded content. The artist describes this process, which she has worked in for over 50 years, as meditative. Though sometimes compared to the work of Agnes Martin, the similarities between the practices are superficial. “There is no other way to produce the work except for a depth of engagement requiring the abandonment of self," Cole has explained, "and this process opens the door to infinity enabling reach outside the physical. For me art must transcend the material.” Born in 1937 in Hodgeman County, KS, she received her BFA from Fort Hays State University in Kansas and her MFA from the University of Arizona in Tucson. Influenced by the Suprematist works of Kazimir Malevich during the late 1950s, she began producing paintings which reflected on time with simple forms. The artist lives and works in California. Today, Cole’s works are held the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, among others.

Artist biography adapted from Artnet.

Pulse & Scope Recap 2018
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We were so thrilled to be able to have the chance to see more fairs than usual this year. While we loved the diversity of artists represented at each of the shows that we visited, we have to give a special shoutout to Pulse and Scope for having consistent programs of top quality galleries and artists. As we walked along the aisles at both fairs, we couldn’t help but be pulled in every direction trying to take in as much of it as possible. We certainly tried to - so here are a few of our favorites!

PULSE

Andy Dixon  Toilette of Venus , 2018 Acrylic and oil pastel on canvas 59 x 47 inches Joshua Liner Gallery

Andy Dixon
Toilette of Venus, 2018
Acrylic and oil pastel on canvas
59 x 47 inches
Joshua Liner Gallery

Amy Lincoln  Sprinkler , 2018 Acrylic on panel 24 × 36 inches Project: ARTspace

Amy Lincoln
Sprinkler, 2018
Acrylic on panel
24 × 36 inches
Project: ARTspace

Kate Ballis  Lenticular II , 2017 Archival Pigment Print 39 x 59 inches Garis & Hahn

Kate Ballis
Lenticular II, 2017
Archival Pigment Print
39 x 59 inches
Garis & Hahn

Agostino Iacurci  Bust n°6 , 2018 Acrylic on canvas 59 1/10 × 39 2/5 × 1 3/5 inches M77 Gallery

Agostino Iacurci
Bust n°6, 2018
Acrylic on canvas
59 1/10 × 39 2/5 × 1 3/5 inches
M77 Gallery

Daisy Patton  Untitled (Mischievous Couple) , 2018 Oil on archival print mounted to panel 80 × 60 inches K Contemporary

Daisy Patton
Untitled (Mischievous Couple), 2018
Oil on archival print mounted to panel
80 × 60 inches
K Contemporary

Bisa Butler  The Safety Patrol , 2018 Quilted and appliquéd cotton, wool and chiffon 82 × 90 inches Claire Oliver Gallery

Bisa Butler
The Safety Patrol, 2018
Quilted and appliquéd cotton, wool and chiffon
82 × 90 inches
Claire Oliver Gallery

Daniel Handal  Java Rice Finch (Bubble Gum) , 2016 Signed, titled, dated, and numbered on label, verso Archival pigment print, painted frame (Edition of 3 + 2 APs) 19 x 15 inches Clamp Art

Daniel Handal
Java Rice Finch (Bubble Gum), 2016
Signed, titled, dated, and numbered on label, verso
Archival pigment print, painted frame (Edition of 3 + 2 APs)
19 x 15 inches
Clamp Art

Martina Lang  The Object 01 , 2017 Digital c-print 35 × 24 × 1 22/25 inches Uprise Art

Martina Lang
The Object 01, 2017
Digital c-print
35 × 24 × 1 22/25 inches
Uprise Art

 

SCOPE

Max Sansing  Stranded on Stony Island , 2018 Oil, Acrylic & Spray Paint 30 x 40 inches Line Dot editions

Max Sansing
Stranded on Stony Island, 2018
Oil, Acrylic & Spray Paint
30 x 40 inches
Line Dot editions

Fahren Feingold   WASTED MOMENTS , 2017 Watercolor 12 × 9 inches The Untitled Space

Fahren Feingold
WASTED MOMENTS, 2017
Watercolor
12 × 9 inches
The Untitled Space

Nathan Wong   NW 28 , 2018 Acrylic on canvas 72 × 60 × 1 inches Joseph Gross Gallery

Nathan Wong
NW 28, 2018
Acrylic on canvas
72 × 60 × 1 inches
Joseph Gross Gallery

Betsy Enzensberger   Glittery Rose Gold Popsicle , 2018 Resin, ink, glitter & plexi 26 × 14 × 14 inches

Betsy Enzensberger
Glittery Rose Gold Popsicle, 2018
Resin, ink, glitter & plexi
26 × 14 × 14 inches

Hélène Cenedese   Beard man #6 , 2018 Oil stick, acrylic on canvas 72 × 60 inches Galerie C.O.A.

Hélène Cenedese
Beard man #6, 2018
Oil stick, acrylic on canvas
72 × 60 inches
Galerie C.O.A.

Ulla-Stina Wikander   Just Call! , 2018 Cross stitch on found object, mixed media 5 9/10 × 7 9/10 × 7 9/10 inches Paradigm Gallery + Studio

Ulla-Stina Wikander
Just Call!, 2018
Cross stitch on found object, mixed media
5 9/10 × 7 9/10 × 7 9/10 inches
Paradigm Gallery + Studio

Gigi Mills   Laundry/Hanging Sheets with A Long Legged Dog , 2018 Oil on linen 20 × 17 inches Emmanuelle G Gallery

Gigi Mills
Laundry/Hanging Sheets with A Long Legged Dog, 2018
Oil on linen
20 × 17 inches
Emmanuelle G Gallery

Explorations of the Natural World by Claire Elliott
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My paintings are centered around explorations of the natural world, with a particular focus on how we catalog, categorize and venerate natural objects. Much of my work is drawn from greenhouses, a space where plants are isolated and bent to human will for our enjoyment.

These types of plants hold a cultural value, we choose to elevate them by letting them into our homes, and preserve and archive them in conservatories. The arrangement of the flora in these spaces reveals narratives ranging from botany to colonialism to romance. Using plants as a vehicle for abstraction, I am fascinated by the disconnect between a painted surface and the artist’s vision. Probing the medium’s capabilities, I find inspiration in the result of trying and failing to capture something, while recognizing the heights and limits of the paint.

www.claireelliott.com

Jaime Brett Treadwell at Pentimenti Gallery

The paintings on view in shift alt delete point to a slight detour from previous directions. Experimentation with new ideas, specifically architectural and mechanical drawing methods, combined with my persistent 1980’s childhood influences, including MTV graphics, digital synthesizers, and Miami Vice, has resulted in a deeper complexity of interwoven parts. I chose the exhibition title shift alt delete after recognizing the correlation between keyboard functions and the shifting realities present throughout this body of work. The shift key is designed to shift from one version to another, such as lower case to upper case. Alt, short for alternate, is designed as a modifier key to adjust or alter change. This ability to change or manipulate reality parallels my recent investigations regarding visual deceptions and spatial ambiguity through line, shape, color, and space. Similar to the key functions, elements in my painting often serve multiple roles. For example, a thin line may operate as the edge of a shape and also contribute to a repeating pattern of lines, later to return as a single line that cuts through another form or shape. These moments of co-existence throughout the painting disrupt the viewer’s perception of truth, often bending reality. Similar to pressing the shift, alt or delete key, these paintings can quickly switch identities back and forth, as they suggest alternate realities or a fictional universe.

www.jaimetreadwell.com


Pentimenti Gallery 

Nov. 10th – Dec. 20th

Philadelphia, PA 

Art Miami, Context and Aqua 2018 Staff Picks

This is our second year being a proud media partner of Art Miami Fairs. As if visiting sunny Miami is not inspiring enough, we got to explore thousands of artworks from across the globe. There were incredible, innovative pieces that stuck out to us from every art career level, but we had to narrow it down to a select few.

Here are our picks from Art Miami, Context and Aqua fairs from the 2018 edition.

Art Miami

Context

Aqua Art Miami

Forrest Lawson

Forrest Lawson is a multi-media sculptor who explores complicated issues experienced within the LGBTQ+ community. Lawson has participated in multiple exhibitions throughout Florida, was featured in Artbourne magazine in 2017, and was commissioned to install a public art sculpture on the University of Central Florida campus. Lawson will obtain his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Central Florida in December 2018 and plans to pursue a Master of Fine Arts degree upon graduation.

Through sculpture and assemblage, my work explores the array of complexities experienced by individuals within the gay community. I create work to reveal internal and external resentments with a variety of mediums and symbolism. As a tribute and a memoir, my practice touches on feelings that resonate personally and universally. I hope for viewers to engage with the work emotionally, and to question their own similar or dissimilar experiences. My work is merely a glimpse into the often unknown or unrecognized struggles of being gay.

Charmaine Koh

Charmaine Koh lives and works in the San Francisco Bay Area. A painter and new media artist, Koh's work explores dissonance, sentimentality, nostalgia, and place. In her paintings, this takes the form of imaginary landscapes constructed out of a jumble of common tropes and motifs. Koh holds an MFA in Fine Arts and an MA in Visual and Critical Studies from the California College of the Arts. She has participated in residencies in the US, Italy, the Philippines, and Singapore, and has exhibited both domestically and internationally.

Val Shamma

Val Shamma is a visual artist and ceramist born in State College, PA. His work investigates consumer electronics through form and function. He received his BA in visual arts and archival studies at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA. He currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

My practice incorporates personal narratives and timelines of technological progress that are synthesized by consumer electronics. I see electronic devices as objects of devotion, vessels that contain and inform memory, sites of visceral interactions between the animate and inanimate, mediators of communication, and signifiers of change. My sculptures, made of clay and found technology detritus, are recognizable but resist immediate identification. I draw from design languages that emphasize serial rigidity, intuitive functionality, and visual simplicity, but my work is offset from manufactured aesthetics. I imbue my work with a tactile softness that is a natural product of using my hands as my primary tools and of referencing my own distant experiences. The gentle corners, smoothed additions, and hazy surfaces of my work point toward incomplete memories of interactions with objects. I aim to make forms that are a convergence of private and cultural experience, using the visual aesthetics and symbolism of functional devices, both real and imagined, as catalysts.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Leslie Feely Gallery

www.lesliefeely.com

December 4 –9, 2018

In its 29th edition, Art Miami maintains a preeminent position in America's modern and contemporary art fair market and is globally recognized as a primary destination for the acquisition of the most important works from the 20th and 21st centuries.

Friedel Dzubas,  First Run , 1972 Acrylic on Canvas, 96Hx96Win

Friedel Dzubas, First Run, 1972 Acrylic on Canvas, 96Hx96Win

Interview with Dakota Sica

Briefly tell us about your gallery and what type of art you specialize in.

Leslie Feely Gallery is located on the Upper East Side in New York City. We specialize in Post War and Contemporary Art.

What can visitors expect from your booth this year and what specific works should they pay attention to?

This year we have a dedicated a section to Richard Diebenkorn, highlighting works from every period of his career.

Including examples of early abstract drawings, stunning figurative works, and an impressive Ocean Park.

Another star of our booth is “First Run" a rare large-scale painting by Friedel Dzubas - this never before seen work is a Dzubas masterpiece.

It will be accompanied by smaller paintings that illustrate the artist’s contributions to color field painting.

We are also proud to present the works of Kikuo Saito. These large-scale gestural abstractions sing with color!

What tips would you share with new art collectors or fair visitors?

I recommend that visitors ask questions. It is very rewarding to talk with people about the work of an artist they may or may not know. Art Miami is an inclusive fair where experienced and new collectors come to learn and grow their collections.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design

www.priveekollektie.art

December 4 –9, 2018

In its 29th edition, Art Miami maintains a preeminent position in America's modern and contemporary art fair market and is globally recognized as a primary destination for the acquisition of the most important works from the 20th and 21st centuries.


Interview with Georgia Mowry

Briefly tell us about your gallery and what type of art you specialize in.

Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design is a leading international gallery specialised in contemporary art and collectible design. Based in The Netherlands, Priveekollektie actively works with a range of collectors, represents internationally recognised artists and designers, and provides a platform for up-and-coming talents to showcase their exceptional pieces.

What can visitors expect from your booth this year and what specific works should they pay attention to?

Priveekollektie exhibits pieces each year at Art Miami that have never been shown in America before. With a focus on the best artists with a European identity, we plan to bring new, exciting and interesting works based upon our three pillars: concept, quality, and value. The works shown feature a highly curated selection of new and exclusive works. One of these works to look out for is the hand tufted tapestry, Luxuria 99, by Dutch artist Catharina van de Ven.

What tips would you share with new art collectors or fair visitors?

Priveekollektie recommends three things to visitors and collectors: to explore the restaurants and nightlife, to visit the private collections that specially open during the week but are normally not open to the public to view, and to have sheer enjoyment of the art crowd and audience that arrives in Miami for this week only.