Posts in Art
Metaphorical Landscapes by Madeline Peckenpaugh
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Madeline Peckenpaugh was born in Milwaukee, WI, and currently resides in Providence, Rhode Island. She has had two solo shows with Seraphin Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, and has exhibited with Avery Galleries, PA, Gross McCleaf Gallery, PA, Schmidt/ Dean Gallery, PA, Sol Koffler Gallery, and Gelman Gallery in Providence, Rhode Island. She has work in the permanent collection of the Woodmere Art Museum in Philadelphia, PA, along with the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Peckenpaugh received her BFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2015, and is currently an MFA painting candidate at the Rhode Island School of Design.

 Statement  

My paintings are depictions of metaphorical landscapes, created through the force and tension of nature and material. The illusion of space within each painting is interrupted by the materials being used, and the narrative of the image is found through the process of that exploration. The landscape is felt through various forces of nature, such as: life-cycles, transitional states of weather, and gravity.

The mind’s depiction of form and reality unfold through the various mark making, in an attempt to create an engaging space. This space is being constructed by echoes of former representations that might suggest or feel like an experience of nature. It is important for me to be conscious of  the physical object of the painting itself, and the removed space within the painting, it's here and not here.

www.madelinepeckenpaugh.com

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Inner Worlds: Interview with Tanner Mothershead
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Tanner Mothershead is a midwestern born artist. He attended undergraduate school at the Northwest Missouri State University before going on to attain his MFA at the University of Iowa with an emphasis in ceramics and minors in painting and sculpture. He has exhibited work at NCECA and published in New American Paintings

A driving force in the creation of his work is a desire to make sense of both people and place. The work stems from a fascination with the human mind's ability to interpret, transform, and create the world around it. Much of the work formed acts as an apparatus for viewing and experiencing a conceptualized inner world in relationship to tangible reality.  His research delves into the functions and meanings of symbolism, spatial relations, and degrees of abstraction. Elements of Jungian psychology, philosophy, and architecture are woven together in these biomorphic surreal narratives.  

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Briefly tell us about your current work.

My current work focuses on the relationship between physical and perceived reality, with an emphasis on the inner worlds people create either for idle pleasure or to escape traumatic experiences. Everyday in the news we hear about mass shootings and are bombarded with senseless acts of violence. I think about events that have happened to the people closest to me as well as a deeply traumatic event in my own life, the dots and lines of happenings and how they connect. The work I make becomes objects of connection. They appear outwardly as fun fantasy worlds with bright color, enticing one to look deeper. Neon doors, steps, and pathways act in contrast to darker, more sinister, elements buried further in.

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At first glance your work looks very material based. Can you give us some insight about your use of materials?

I suspend layers of paint and other materials in transparent resin in order to form sculptural paintings. This drive stems from my compulsive desire to give physical form and depth to these imagined spaces; I wish to make more concrete the fact that the mental landscape is just as real as the one we all share. They take the shape of geoded doorways or shards, reminiscent of transitional spaces, as well as how our perceptions of reality build up over time and pressure. Most recently I have begun making them in the form of the midbrain and visual cortexes, the parts of human anatomy linking the eye to the brain. They remain as fragmentary images of places alien to outsiders and have a shallow, ghostly, topographical map stamped on its surface.

Spiritually, I work to embody elements from two notable psychotherapists, who also dabbled in creative practice: Carl Jung, who was a leading pioneer in the understanding of the inner human, and Herman Rorschach, who utilized a delicate balance of pure abstraction to that of recognizable objectivity.

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Who in the art community inspires you?

Currently the artists I have found inspiring, and thoroughly enjoyed following their practice, have been Lauren Clay, Michael Reeder, Alex Eckman-Lawn, and Donté K. Hayes.

Interview with Mari Shaw
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Over the summer, Create! Magazine had the pleasure of speaking with Mari Shaw, an intellectual property lawyer, author, and art collector. While the original purpose of our call was to discuss Words, Books, and the Spaces They Inhabit, Book One of her series on The Noble Art of Collecting and her forthcoming book, The Noble Art of Art Writing, we ended up having a lively conversation about how she became interested in art, her experiences in Berlin where she lives four months a year, trends in the art world, and more.

Mari Shaw’s interest in art didn’t happen by accident but it certainly wasn’t by design. It began bubbling at a young age. In her upcoming book, The Noble Art of Art Writing, she explained:

“When I was a child, the place that most impressed me was my Uncle Martin’s three-story house with a clinker brick façade topped by a pitched roof that sloped down to one side. It sat on a narrow lot of a block of shorter symmetrical houses in Skokie, a suburb of Chicago. My father called Uncle Martin’s house an eyesore. Admittedly its irregular dense blocks of cement burned into various colors and patterns was at odds with the surrounding mostly beige homes and curtained windows, but I found my uncle’s house brilliantly modern and enchanting, both outside and inside. The living room furniture included an Eames Molded Plywood straight-backed Lounge Chair, a flat sleek fireplace with a stack of logs at the ready, a phonograph system and a collection of classical records. The walls were lined with pictures, most of them made by my uncle, and shelves and shelves of books. When I visited, which was often, my uncle talked to me about art and music, frequently illustrating his point by reading from one of his books. “Art reshapes how we respond to the world”, he would tell me. And so it was that I came to understand the restorative and uplifting powers of art.”

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On her eleventh birthday, Shaw’s nascent interest in the arts hit another gear when her parents granted her permission to ride the ‘El’, the elevated subway line that runs from the suburbs, including Skokie, by herself into the heart of Chicago to visit the Art Institute. With unfettered access to this renowned collection, she became a museum regular. Closer to her suburban home, she spent untold hours in bookstores and libraries feeding her omnivorous reading addiction, a compulsion which served her well when she wrote for her college newspaper, alongside its editor Roger Ebert, who went on to become among the most important American film critics of his generation. Surprisingly, Shaw never took an art or art history course in college or graduate school. In fact, although she loved going to museums and circled around the arts in a meaningful way, she wasn’t much engaged in collecting art until later on. Like most young collectors, she started with inexpensive prints and posters.

Shaw says that moving to the east coast in 1972 marked a turning point for her. Already a self-described ‘art addict’, she was thrilled to be living across the Parkway from the Philadelphia Museum of Art which she visited every Sunday, capped by a weekend in NYC every couple of months. Before long, frequenting Philadelphia galleries sparked an enthusiasm for collecting original works by Philadelphia artists. The art of these Philadelphia artists still hangs in the five-story home she now shares with her husband Peter Shaw, including works by Thomas Chimes, Tristan Tristin Lowe, Quentin Morris, Bill Walton, Eileen Neff, David Goerk, Felipe Jesus Consalvos, Kocot and Hatton, and Jon Poblador Poblkdor. She became an active participant in the arts community in Philadelphia and still is.

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In The Noble Art of Collecting, Shaw explains how her collecting jolted into an entirely new dimension in 1985, the year after the Shaw’s married.

“The first serious fight I ever had with my husband Peter was over whether we should collect [expensive] art. I had been buying art for decades…But Peter was proposing a whole different thing: buying a 5-foot oil painting on canvas by Dorothea Rockburne, titled Balance (1985). Though Balance enchanted me with its brilliant colors and scrumptious strokes, the notion of possessing it was abhorrent to the vestiges of my 1960s flower-child mentality. This painting is a masterpiece that belongs in a museum [not in our house]. ”

On the Shaw’s next Sunday visit to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Peter pointed to labels indicating most of Mari’s favorite works were donated. Mari softened, but, ever the lawyer, she required conditions for collecting, which the couple have followed with only a few exceptions, before agreeing:

(1) They only buy the work of living artists in the primary market, rather than at auction or through secondary market dealers, to ensure the artists profit from the sale of work the Shaw’s buy. Similarly, they seek out artists who are out of favor in the market, or emerging artists and artists in their local communities who have demonstrated a serious practice when they first buy their work.

(2) They do not buy to sell, though on rare occasion they do sell work they have owned for more than a decade to raise money for a non-profit. Shaw believes conservation and patronage are integral aspects of collecting. “I think the privilege of living with art in your lifetime comes with the responsibility of conserving it and supporting artists and cultural institutions.”

(3) Finally, Mari was and is passionate about sharing their collection with the public. She did not want works to sit unseen in storage permanently. Peter agreed, and the couple makes sure their works are exhibited, loaned, or displayed in their home most of the time. They accept at least one museum group per month for a private tour of their collection during the times they are in Philadelphia, and Mari enjoys making the artworks available to students, including repeat visits from classes she has taught over the years at the University of Pennsylvania and other schools. Her granddaughter Lucy’s preschool class once came for an art tour.

Read an Artblog feature with Mari Shaw  here .

Read an Artblog feature with Mari Shaw here.

So, it was that in 1985, the Shaw’s bought Dorothea Rockburne’s oil painting from the Andre Emmerich Gallery in New York, which at the time seemed a very expensive acquisition. The painting still hangs in their living room, but is promised to the Whitney Museum. Other works from their collection have also been promised or donated to other museums, including ten film and video works they donated to the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 2017. They do not turn down requests to loan work in their collection to museum exhibitions if the artists who made them request that they do.

In 2004, the diversity and pace of the couple’s collecting took a leap when Mari bought an apartment in Berlin, where she spends four warm weather months every year. While their collection which began primarily with American artists had already broadened to include European and Latin American art, and unwittingly, a concentration of women artists, the Shaw’s knowledge and access to art dealers and art knowledge soared when they established a Berlin base. Every spring, Peter joins Mari the last weekend in April for Berlin Gallery Weekend and spends two weeks looking at art in German’s exciting capital. Peter returns in early summer to travel with Mari to other European cities for a couple of weeks of Biennales, Museum exhibitions, or art fairs.

During her time alone in Berlin, Shaw reads, draws, walks, and haunts bookstores and galleries by day and often goes to the theater or a concert in the evening. In 2007, Mari served as the first American representative on an advisory committee for the quinquennial Documenta XII art exhibition held in Kassel, Germany. In 2009, she began to write her first book, Painter and Pataphysician Thomas Chimes alone in her apartment and across the street at the internet café housed in a museum dedicated to the Ramones, the band that introduced punk. She went to the café as soon as it opened, long before the Ramones crowd roused, where the owner supplied her with free tap water, a rarity in Berlin, and, now and then a free cup of coffee. In 2015, Mari met Caroline Schneider, owner of Sternberg Press in her morning Yoga class. Schneider encouraged her to write a book to be published by Sternberg Press, which eventually became The Noble Art of Collecting.

Among Mari’s current on-going projects in Philadelphia is working with Artblog to enhance its annual Art Writing Challenge. Shaw has been connected with Artblog, Philadelphia’s top online art publication, for decades. She has gone from having been featured in interviews to contributing guest posts, serving on the advisory committee and now sits on the Board. She loves the story behind the organization’s founding and its commitment to diverse, quality writing.

To this end, she saw an opportunity to expand expend and secure Artblog’s annual Art Writing Challenge by making a three-year commitment to up the amount and number of money prizes awarded to the winners. In 2019, she established a new award category in music writing as a match to contributions from others to the Art Writing Challenge. While it was exciting to solidify this online platform for celebrating emerging writers, She wanted to do more. Recognizing that there is something special about having one’s work published on printed paper, she decided the next step was to create a paper book to memorialize the history of Artblog, its Art Writing Challenge, and each of the winning essays selected since the inception of the competition. Voila! She introduced the idea for The Noble Art of Art Writing, which will be hitting bookstores next year as Book Two in her “Noble Art of Collecting” series.

We end our conversation thinking about the iconic opening to Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities:

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. It was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of Incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us…

Shaw pointed out how beautifully these well-crafted words give us perspective in our own troubling times, 160 years after Dickens wrote them.

“Bravo to Artblog for continuing to encourage and professionally acknowledge a new generation of art writers in Philadelphia”, bravo to the artists who took the Art-writing challenge, and bravo, to the winners,” she said.

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Mari Shaw will be moderating a discussion on November 15, 2019, from 2 to 3:30pm at the Kislak Center of the University of Pennsylvania at 3420 Walnut Street discussion called “Invisible and Illuminating illuminating”, based on a chapter in her upcoming book The Noble Art of Art Writing. Two-time Art Challenge winner Janyce Denise Glasper Glazer, Manager of the Percent for Art Program Manager for the City of Philadelphia and Artblog Board member Jacque Liu, and multidisciplinary artist and educator, Shelley Spector, who teaches at the University of Pennsylvania Weitzman School of Deisgn and the University of the Arts will be panelists.

Mari Shaw’s books Painter and Pataphysician Thomas Chimes and The Noble Art of Collecting can be purchased on our web shop.

Floral Ceramics by Liying Zhang
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 I am an artist who was born and raised in Beijing, China, now living and working in Chicago and New York, United State. I earned the BFA degree from Beijing University of Technology in 2015. In the same year, I transferred to New York State College of Ceramic in Alfred University, and got the second BFA degree in 2017. I earned MFA degree at School of the Art institute of Chicago in 2019.

My art practice mainly involves ceramics, printmedia, and fiber. In the early time, my subject of art was mainly based on the experiences and feelings from childhood. I have been explaining how the artworks came as confrontation with the past while achieving self-knowledge of the present. Found objects from antique store were used into my works a lot. In my created world, half-memory and half-imagination, everything could happen and change below their surfaces.  

My work also addresses universal emotions. In the recent years, the topic of ritual and making art in healing come to the fist view. I want my artwork could provides the strong atmosphere that can address all of audience relate to the works in one way or another.

 For me ceramics is a magical material allow me to create the ideal 3D from based on  my drawings. Shelter is the latest series of works in my art practice. I aim to create an habitat-like sculpture that have never been seen, also shows a sense of insecurity that I always have toward the surrounding and society around me. The Sculptures also can be seen as an ideal surrealistic miniature construction of hiding place or safe place in my imagination, and help me to chase away anxieties.

www.liyingzhang.com

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“Somnambulist” An Immersive Exhibition by Ryan Bock at Ki Smith Gallery
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Opening on October 26th, Ryan Bock (aka Bockhaus) will present Somnambulist a solo exhibition of new works at Harlem's Ki Smith Gallery. In what promises to be one of the season’s most timely yet strikingly unexpected shows, Somnambulist harkens back to the hey-day of German Expressionism, conceived through the lens of today's digitized world.

Taking primary inspiration from German silent horror film "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”(1921), this radical installation transports its viewers to an immersive Dystopian dreamscape, where seemingly ordinary objects are imbued with insidious agendas. Assembled from a garden variety of bed-frames and "functional items made non-functional", Somnambulist's black-and-white “shadow world” is a frightening psychological analysis of America, examining the intersection between historical events and contemporary times.

Just as Surrealists of the 1920's drew influence from Freud's dream studies, Bock also muses on the uninhibited state of sleep, and the subtle, hypnotic process through which deep-seated horrors can awaken within our own subconscious. "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” is an allegory about the tragedy of World War I and Germany's economic depression that foreshadowed the rise of Nazism and World War II --- and with Somnambulist, Bock illustrates the startling divide between city and rural American life that gave way to Trumpism and the Alt-Right movement. Bock seizes upon this eerie correlation & realizes that YES -- Americans were lulled into a vulnerable state, losing control over their own actions & allowing history to repeat itself once more…..

The artist states: “I’m here to report, not to provide anyone with a false, idealized version of the world. In terms of what I’m trying to communicate: I hope that it’s hopeful. I hope that there is hope.”

Somnambulist will be on view through November 23rd. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11-7pm.

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"My Thousand Sounds" Exhibition by Painter Adam Lee at BEERS London

BEERS London is thrilled to present My Thousand Sounds, the third solo exhibition at the gallery by esteemed Australian painter Adam Lee. The title, borrowed from Christian Wiman’s 2008 poem, A Small Prayer in a Hard Wind, suggests the notion of a divine presence amidst human fragility.

In his newest paintings, Lee continues his ongoing fascination with painting as a form of private pilgrimage. For Lee, the process of painting can be perceived as a metonym for a type of spiritual voyage. His intention is that the viewer might perceive these paintings as personal votive objects linking the familiar terrains of memory, family, and loss, with that of an uncanny yet unseen sense of corporeal transcendence. In many ways the works function as relic-like objects that house much greater sublime ideas. 

About the Artist

Adam Lee works from his studio in the hills of the Macedon Ranges, Victoria, Australia, and he works mostly with traditional painting and drawing materials. His work references a wide range of sources including historical and colonial photography, biblical narratives, natural history, and most recently seem to embody more imagined or fantastical sources, investigating aspects of the human condition in relation to ideas of temporal and supernatural worlds. There is a sort of unsettling stillness to Lee’s work, a type of peaceful disquietude, where figures are situated in strange, unearthly spaces seem to tend to their own spiritual procession. As his practice has moved from more traditional ‘landscape’ painting to a practice that incorporates more emotive, poetic and narrative qualities, the work seems laboured upon with an almost religious reverence – somewhere between RB Kitaj and Rothko, oddly enough. There is a stylization of all Lee’s forms – where the figures become almost crystallized – and the viewer senses the creative and critical processes Lee undergoes to create his distinct bodies of work. From hunters, to shamanism, to fatherhood, Lee’s themes result in an informative nucleus from which he works prolifically to create large paintings and drawings that respond to a central theme. As viewers, we become complicit to the world he creates.

Exhibition dates: October 19 - November 23, 2019

Studio Sunday: Brandi Hofer
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This week’s Studio Sunday feature highlights the work of Canadian artist, Brandi Hofer. With three pieces from her GUS series currently on view with PxP Contemporary, we wanted to learn more about her creative practice, how she tackles creative blocks, and what inspires her work. Behind the bright colors and gestural marks lies a wealth of emotion tied to love, loss, new life, and most importantly, the joys and challenges of motherhood. Learn more about the artist and her work in the interview below!

Bio

Brandi Hofer was born in Lloydminster, Saskatchewan in 1986. She studied in Red Deer, Alberta, at Red Deer College from 2004 - 2006 before transferring to the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design in Halifax, where she completed her Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2008.

Hofer has worked in several art media including: drawing, printmaking, and painting, with oils, acrylics encaustic, mixed media, and watercolors.

Hofer has long focused on female portraits and has explored themes of feminism, empowerment, the emotional self, and the female psyche. Hofer's work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions in France, London, New York, and all across Canada. In 2011, she attended residencies at Red Deer College, Toronto Island, the Marnay Art Centre outside of Paris France, and was part of artist Robin Lambert's project in Montreal, Quebec. She was listed as the online Saatchi Gallery’s “Artist to Watch” feature on their website. Most recently her work appeared on HGTV’s House of Bryan, Bryan Inc, and has been published in The World of Interiors Magazine and a General Motors commercial.

Her show "Gus", based on parenthood, for 2018 traveled to Red Deer at the Harris-Warke Gallery, Lloydminster with through The Collective Art Market, and the Rouge Gallery in Saskatoon.

Brandi Hofer's studio where she works and creates is located in Lloydminster, Alberta, Canada.

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When did you first become interested in art?

Art or being an artist and creative has always been a part of me. From a very young age, I was interested in all forms of art, particularly painting and drawing. Every book in our home had an original drawing on its pages. My parents were always very encouraging and open to my interests, they never pushed or questioned, they were just supportive of whatever interest my siblings and I had. If I received a gift from someone, it was always related to the arts. I remember breaking a wishbone on Thanksgiving when I was about 4, and I wished aloud for a pack of markers, that week in the mailbox the “wishbone” delivered. I was very fortunate, in the regard that I had a support system, encouragement, love, and the space to experiment, explore and create.

Around my second year in the visual arts program, something began to shift, and I made a conscious decision to actively pursue the avenue of becoming a professional visual artist. I had no idea what being an artist and running an art studio or what it meant to run a self-employed business actually entailed. I just knew that I was passionate about creating, it made me happy, it was fulfilling, and I would do anything to be able to do it every day.

Tell us about the inspiration behind your work and what your creative process is like.

Nothing can prepare you for parenthood, being a parent is one of the most difficult and challenging endeavors in one's life, however, I have no doubt it is the most meaningful. As an artist, I am influenced and inspired by my everyday environment. In this new series of artworks, I aim to highlight and capture the beauty of being a parent, (from what I've experienced) as the richest time in my life. This series aims to speak about my triumphs and struggles as a mother. It deals with the ideals of motherhood, its morals, and its priorities. It is an exciting series that revels in a mother’s time with her child.

I would like to begin by establishing that I rarely like to bring up or to discuss the subject matter of losing my mother in 2014, being that it is emotionally painful. I lost my mother, my beacon of wisdom and love, my sense of home. After a brief fight with lung cancer, my mom passed, I was six months pregnant at the time with my first child. I found her death to be beyond life-shattering. Devastatingly I lost my “home”, the constant in my life. Though her values and way of life are entrenched in my every day, I still long for the sound of her voice and cling to the dream of her meeting her grandchildren. Her meeting them for even a minute, to see how amazing, beautiful, and smart they are, those thoughts are the most heart wrenching for me. There is no doubt in my mind that my son Gus and my husband Carly saved my sanity in those trying months following her death. Gus was my focus, and Carly was my strength. I learned in that trying time that a mother’s love for a child is an insurmountable love, and I now know how much my mother loved me. 

That experience and shock of death awoke something in me. I had a new thirst for life. Nothing scared me anymore. Nothing could be more painful than losing my mother. You will not get the things you want in this life by not taking a chance in the first place.

“Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Almost everything--all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure--these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

-Steve Jobs

Since the passing of my mother, my life has kicked into high gear. Time is our most precious commodity and should be spent on the things that matter most: family, love, and one’s passions. Moments are fickle and fleeting; I have endeavored to make the most of mine. I refuse to lock myself away in my studio alone and not include my children in my passion for the arts. I want to show them the beauty of mark-making, dancing, and expressing yourself with a brushstroke or a splash of paint. I want to teach them that it’s ok to make a mess, “YES Gus you can step in the paint, squish it between your hands, and no Finn, you can’t eat it”!  My 2-year-old son Gus and I had the most amazing time together painting this series; I hope the unique artwork can even scratch the surface of the significance of our time together.

The paintings consist of a series of portraits. The intention of the work is to project strength, integrity, love and the struggle of what it takes to be a parent. This series is a celebration of motherhood, parenthood and the sheer innocence of being playful. The mindset and mood of the artwork is to project the incorruptible freedom of a child’s open cognizance, and zest for living life in the moment. 

What do you hope your viewers take away from seeing your art?

My aim and hope are that the viewer can connect in some way, get a feel for the artwork, and grasp not necessarily the exact meaning that I have intended while creating, but to have their own associations and perceptions.  Moreover, the viewer can feel the passion and emotion behind the imagery, figure, portrait, and forms in the artwork. 

What is one piece of advice that you would give to your younger self?

I do think about this from time to time. I have a few “wishes”, like utilizing social media a few years ahead, in a more effective manner for business purposes, I could have built a wider audience had I been more focused or aware of its effectiveness earlier on. I also wish I had applied myself as hard as I do today, and made a point of being in the studio, including it as a part of my daily routine, like I do presently. I have always been very prolific, but I think could have had more of a vision and focus for my practice. I still would not change a thing about how my life or my creative process, or the way my art business has evolved into what it is today. There are important lessons to be learned in the way that life falls into place. I feel like changing anything would possibly affect the outcome of where I am now, I am happy and grateful for the life that I have presently, and in the end, I guess I wouldn’t take my future self’s advice. 

How do you overcome creative blocks? 

I believe in working through creative blocks. As long as you are in your studio creating, there is a lesson to be learned or ideas to explore. You are never going to get ahead if you can’t take the first step of being present in your practice. I also believe in rest. You cannot master your active life if you cannot master your resting life. Living a balanced life helps my practice immensely: getting a proper night’s sleep, taking naps, reading, eating well, spending time with loved ones, meditating, and exercising. Because when I finally get that time in the studio it feels like an honor and a special treat. How many people can say they do what we do as artists? I am always grateful for the ability of simply being an artist, creating something out of nothing, and creative blocks are just an organic part of the process. 

Do you have any big collaborations, projects, exhibitions, etc going on during the rest of the year that you'd like to share?

The most recent show that I am involved in is with PXP Contemporary for their “Faces & Figures” show. My work from the “MINE” series is soon to be available in an upcoming publication titled, “FEMME Issue II”. My “MINE” series (from 2018/19) has found homes in several galleries. I just had my third child recently, and I am taking a month or two to rest. I will continue working on my ongoing commissioned work, as well as my personal in-progress series. The focus of my new series is based on heritage, lineage, and imagery from found photos from the past, this series will be opening at the Assiniboia Gallery in 2021. I also was recently featured in an episode for a documentary series “Making it in Saskatchewan” which aired in June. The “GUS – artwork created by Mother & Son” series just finished its tour. The series was a 44-piece show and interactive installation, travelled to 3 Galleries across Canada, in 2017/18. 

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By Alicia Puig

Three Dimensional Sculpture by Ling-lin Ku
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Ling-lin receive her MFA from University of Texas at Austin in 2019 and BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2016. In addition to being an artist Ling-lin has a background in music and law. She has a degree in Law at Taiwan. Ling-lin has been exhibited her work in cities ranging from New York, to Austin and LA, and selected into residencies including International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP) in Brooklyn and Haystack Open Studio, Maine. In 2019 Ling-lin is one of the four recipients of Seebacher Prize for Fine Arts awarded by the American Austrian Foundation. 

Statement

Double life, double play. My work is animistic and uncanny in the same time. I grew up in a culture that celebrates animism; influenced by the Dao belief that every object has a kind of unseen life and energy. Yet In the process of coming into life, uncanny things happen. While combining an enlarged egg-shaped dome with rigid, black raven legs, a narrative of death and birth appears. The tensions and nuance between strange and familiar create an eeriness.

By playing with the expectations of context and collaging parts into hybrids, I create objects that beyond our conventional understandings of the physical world, where seemingly familiar things can have alternate identities. Employing digital scanning and modeling is a way to jump into my own three-dimensional rabbit hole where I can precisely distort recognizable forms to re-assign their identities through hybridizing, recomposing, altering materials and hyperbolic scale shifts.

www.linglinku.com

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Illusionistic Environments by Katie Neece
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Katie Neece (b. 1989) is an artist and educator living and working in South Bend, Indiana. Katie is a third year MFA candidate in Painting at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. She graduated with her undergraduate degree in drawing and painting and a minor in art history from Indiana University, South Bend. She also works at the Snite Museum of Art at Notre Dame as program coordinator for summer high school educational programs for aspiring art students.

Statement 

Using traditional oil painting techniques that rely on nuanced physical touch and demanding material execution, my work incorporates imagery from computer graphics software programs and related digital ephemera. I create an artificial pictorial space using gradients, drop shadows, and flat areas to construct an illusionistic environment­ within the conventions of the screen and digital manifestations of space. Choosing to paint the digital constructions draws attention to both advancements in technology and the advancements in the historical trajectory of painting.

I use the pictorial language of geometric abstraction among the early 20th century European avant-garde, while simultaneously focusing on 90’s American mall aesthetic as a site to incorporate these forms as a reference to an inherent optimism in a utopian future that has continually failed to materialize. This re-contextualization is an attempt to illustrate that the past continually reminds us of the future’s failure in the form of haunting. 

www.instagram.com/katie_neece/

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Deciding Which Opportunities Are Right for You
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In this episode, Kat shares her personal experiences from the past decade with exhibitions, art fairs, publications, and other art opportunities. She shares entertaining stories and lessons on what was worth it and what wasn't.

She includes some personal stories that are humorous and a little cringe-worthy such as getting lost in New York while trying to deliver paintings on foot.

Listen to this episode if you are starting out and need help figuring out which gigs to pursue.

Johan Barrios Solo Exhibition, "Monólogo"

 

J O H A N  B A R R I O S

 

Monólogo

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Artist Reception: Friday, October 25, 6:00 – 8:30 pm

Anya Tish Gallery is pleased to announce Monólogo, a solo exhibition of new work by Johan Barrios, a Colombian artist now living and working in Houston. This is Barrios’ second solo exhibition with Anya Tish Gallery. Monólogo features paintings that convey the paradoxical dimensions of one-self. Barrios' work has surreal and cinematic qualities with a haunting aesthetic that is at once captivating and unsettling. 

“For me, all the pieces that are part of this project called Monólogo are the result of questioning what we call identity. All these self-portraits try to give an irrational look at how we are exposed to a symbolic solitude that distances us from any collective system. From my perspective, these figures are a replacement for a certain emotion that can often be related to fears and failures and become vulnerable to the conflicts that arise in the work itself creating a wider range of questions between image and spectators.”    - Johan Barrios

 Johan Barrios, born in 1982, is one of the most technically accomplished painters of his generation. Barrios’ work provokes the unique ability to make us feel and sympathize with his images invoking a harmony of the imagination and cognitive thought. Using himself as his own model he creates psychological portraits full of contradictions, doubt, beauty and anxiety, that exist between the surface of the canvas and trompe l’oeil illusion. Barrios pays close attention to every detail, expertly rendering muscle tone, hands, fabric wrinkles and flyaway hairs. He effortlessly translates light and shadow, executing his pieces with the proficiency of old masters. Depicted in a state of suspended tension, the subject has no identity, no narrative, no location, yet carries a diffused emotional resonance that addresses existential issues such as loneliness, self-discovery, intimacy and fragility.

Johan Barrios received his Masters in Fine Arts from the Universidad de Antioquia in Medellín, Colombia, and has since exhibited across the globe in such major cities as Zürich, Switzerland; New York City, New York; Barcelona, Spain; Cologne, Germany; Montreal, Canada; Los Angeles, California; and Denmark. His work has been featured in numerous renowned print and online publications, including ArtMaze, HI FRUCTOSE, Minus 37, The Jealous Curator, and Juxtapoz Arts and Culture Magazine.

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Storytelling Through Painting by Jazmin Donaldson
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Jazmin Donaldson

Jazmin lives and works in London and recently graduated from the MFA Program at the Slade School of Fine Art. Recent exhibitions include The Field, ASC Gallery London, Wells Art Contemporary, Wells, Distant Heres, The Stone Space, London and Cartoons and Cereal, Offshoot Gallery, London.

 STATEMENT:

In my work I explore the idea of storytelling with painting. The stories initiate from an autobiographical point of view and then take their own form by adding fantastical elements. I am interested in the intersection between memories and fantasy. My work is influenced by the world of fairy tales and myths where I re-use already known motifs in order to tell contemporary stories and concerns. I am specifically interested in women’s role in society and change over time, how we perceive that role and what feminism means today.

I am interested in the creation of each one of the characters of the stories and what they each represent. Elements that I am interested in exploring through different imagery are themes of identity, transformation, the absurd, the nonsense and the role reversal. All of them have in common the disruption of meaning or multiple meanings, which, in the end is part of an always shifting language that I am searching for.

www.jazmindonaldson.com 

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Wandering Players by Delphine Hennelly
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Wandering Players
Delphine Hennelly


Opening Reception: Saturday October 12th, 12-10pm.
Artist Talk: Saturday, October 12th at 4pm.
Showing Through: Friday, November 1st, 2019

1523 b Webster St. Oakland, CA 94612
info@part2gallery.com

pt.2 is excited to present “Wandering Players” a solo exhibition by Delphine Hennelly opening Saturday, October 12th in Downtown Oakland. The exhibition will feature a new series of paintings by the New York based artist. pt.2 gallery is located at 1523 b Webster St. and is just blocks away from both 12th & 19th St Bart Stations. Opening receptions at pt.2: are always free and open to the public. To receive a preview of the exhibition please contact info@part2gallery.com.

Taking as axiomatic the notion that there is no time but the present, which. contains past and future I use repetition as a means to employ this concept of time in the paintings. Much of this thought stems from Gilles Deleuze’s ideas on Difference and Repetition. I enjoy the idea of a liminal space where past and future can be inscribed in a present. In repeating a motif or an image I see the space of a continuity in time simultaneously accepting the fact of the still image. A painting will never be a narrative in movement such as would happen in film but perhaps a painting can allude to the temporal or the notion of an omnipresent event. I enjoy how in every repetition there occurs something specific, and therefore new in the work. It is within this structural thought that drawing becomes a key component of the work. Welding concept with form I lean towards bending the nature of the paint to fulfill a graphic need mimicking ideas of reproduction, the print, paper, ink, a doodle.

Wandering Players takes it’s title from the name given to actors of the Elizabethan period in England; Strolling Players. The figures in my paintings take on the role of actors playing archetypes in their ubiquitous banality. Slightly costumed, meandering a stage set in a bucolic landscape , an abstraction of the pastoral, the Idyllic. Anachronistic, their journeys remain random. The old dictum about the point being not the end of something, or the arrival, but how you get there. At the outset of any journey one does not often or always know where it will take you and what you will encounter. Unexpected things happen, you go up blind alleys, you get lost but you always bring something back that you can latch onto for the next foray. There are struggles, rocks, impediments but there are also discoveries and joys, sun and shade, moments of respite.

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Gina DeCagna
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Originally from the New York metro area, Gina DeCagna is a London-based cultural producer, creating interdisciplinary installations inspired by architecture, language and literature, semiotics, and philosophy to engage with time, space, and consciousness. Through research-driven methodologies and cultural investigations, she creates and curates cross-genre writing, intertextual media, and interdisciplinary publications or exhibitions in and beyond gallery spaces.  

She is pursuing her MFA at Goldsmiths, University of London and is a 2019 Venice Biennale Fellow under the British Council. DeCagna has shown in solo and group exhibitions in London, New York, Philadelphia, and forthcoming Venice. She studied English, Creative Writing and Fine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania, where she founded, edited, and directed a publication and community of over four hundred collaborating artists and writers known as Symbiosis (2012–2016).

STATEMENT

Humble in construction, cardboard pleats yield an unexpected sense of architectural strength. The corrugation — its dips, folds, and contracted, undulating wrinkles in time — arouse a precarious sense of empowerment for the public citizen, enabling our usage to become the most commonplace consumerism within late capitalist society. On regular recycling collection days in London — and likewise in many metropolitan depos across the western world — one frequently encounters the neighbourhood’s accumulated cardboard stacks sprawled in bundles on curbs, bagged with other rubbish, or deposited within large metal cages ready for collection. Cardboard is the medium used by the disempowered, the homeless, and the suffering for fickle protection and shelter; historically, ‘shanty towns’ have disquieted us with the ramifications of gross income inequality. Have things changed so much today in the age of neoliberalism, or have the inequalities simply been made less visible due to the shuffling of waste? How much are we obscuring the excesses of our consumption? These installations demonstrate the capaciousness of waste.

www.ginadecagna.art

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Paintings of Daily Life by Hiejin Yoo
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Los Angeles-based Hiejin Yoo’s (b. 1987) work will be exhibited at Half Gallery, NY; Paul Kasmin Gallery, NY; Fredric Snitzer Gallery, FL and she has exhibited at ltd Los Angeles, CA; Smart Objects, CA and Nicodim Gallery, CA. Her work is recently included in Hort Family Collection in New York.Yoo earned an M.F.A. at University of California Los Angeles (2018) and a B.A from Seoul Women’s University, and a Post Baccalaureate/B.F.A from School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

My paintings are an  intimate  journal  and  meditations  on  self-discovery.  They grow from journal entries and the world around me. I keep a brief diary of daily life, and it is  the  everyday,  mundane  things  that  inspire  me  most.  Each painting contains things that remind me of my personal experience and has a story that I want to tell, so I zoom in to the focal point and crop the parts that I don’t need. The traces of my memories show that I have enjoyed a remarkable life. I strive to make each of my paintings a reflection of my perception of the moment.  Since these ordinary moments  have  been  so  strongly etched  on  my  consciousness,  each  moment  of  my  life  becomes  an  event  and  a  personal history  as  soon  as  I  express  my  daily  life  as  a  painting.  The memories are  telling me something about what I remember in my life when I work and interact with them.

www.hiejinyoo.com

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