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Christian Böhmer Interview | Moniker Art Fair
Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

For our next preview feature from the upcoming Moniker Art Fair in New York, we’re sharing an interview with Christian Böhmer! Christian is a self-taught contemporary artist who creates large-scale murals along with drawings and paintings. He has exhibited work around the world including in Australia, Germany, The Netherlands, and Switzerland among others. Most recently, he completed a mural painting for the "one wall project" curated by the Urban Nation Museum of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. After learning more about his work and process, we’ll certainly be looking forward to seeing what he exhibits at the fair!

Tell us about your background. You describe having roots in the graffiti movement of the 90's so was this the type of art that first inspired you and that you first created? 

Yes, graffiti was the kind of art that influenced me most when I was a kid in the mid-nineties. I was lucky enough to live only a few kilometers from Europe’s largest legal graffiti hall of fame at that time, which was the famous "Schlachthof Wiesbaden". Once a year, there came the world’s most famous writers together to have a graffiti jam for one weekend. I was so fascinated to see what was possible to do just with a spray can, that I decided to try this on my own. As it was a legal spot to paint graffiti, there was no need to hurry or to get nervous. I think this is why I had time enough to experiment in every direction, which included painting characters, too. I found out that I had much more talent in character painting then in writing letters....

How has your work developed since then? When and why did you turn to portraits? 

The first few years I developed in painting characters and as I got better and better, I moved towards a photorealistic style. I believe the most difficult subject one can paint in photorealism is a portrait, where there are no mistakes allowed. And when you dive into this world of painting portraits, you find out that there’s a lot of stories you can tell with that kind of art.

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Images courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Images courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Can you explain your reasoning behind covering various body parts of your subjects - namely their heads and faces, but also in recent work, their hands as well?

As I said, it is very interesting to tell stories within portraits. I did that for a long time, but one day you ask yourself, what will be the next challenge? What else can I add to these stories? When you think about that, the next logical step will be to transform the portrait, to paint it in an abstract way. But the abstract in my portrait painting is not the transformation of color or shape, but the paper bag. I found out that for me this is a perfect medium to use in order to transform shape, to give it a message, or to simply hide the face itself. Sometimes less is more :)

You recently completed a new mural in Berlin, congratulations! How did that project come about? How often do you create larger, public works and do you enjoy it as much as your smaller pieces? 

It was Yasha, the director of the Urban Nation Museum of urban contemporary art in Berlin, who asked me to paint this specific wall. I just began working on a new series of drawings, which plays with red colored hands, that tell all those stories that hidden faces can’t tell. This series deals with people on the edge of society, the ones nobody listens to. And the wall I painted in Berlin is located in an area where these people live. So it was the perfect match.

Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

What will you be showing at Moniker in New York? 

I will be showing this new series of people with red hands hidden behind their paper bag mask. But you need to see it in person!

Do you have any additional exciting projects going on in 2019 and beyond that you'd like to share?

Yes, I will have a huge solo show in Mainz, Germany in September. I’m very glad to be there because that is the place where I grew up and where I had my first graffiti writing experience. I have not been back there for more than 15 years!

I will also have a group show in October at 19Karen Gallery near Brisbane in Australia, which I’m also looking forward to. I love the idea that people from all over the world can have the opportunity to see my art in person.

Moniker will be held May 1 - 5 in New York City at:
718 Broadway
NoHo, Manhattan
New York City, NYC
10003

Learn more about Moniker Art Fair by visiting their website.

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Why I Started Create! Magazine
Photo by Emily Grace Photography

Photo by Emily Grace Photography

I started my first magazine from a tiny studio apartment six years ago out of a desperate need for a creative community. I had no idea what I was doing at the time, and since I didn’t have the funding to start a physical gallery space, this was the next best thing I could come up with, and I am so thankful that I did. This desire to connect with other artists and empower them on their journey has been a constant over the years, and continues to inspire me to grow Create! as well as venture into exciting new projects that will support the growth of the emerging artist community. While I was developing my painting practice, there was a missing component of human connection and support on this unpredictable journey.

Back then, I had no money, no design experience, and all I had was a random idea that I decided to execute after working numerous minimum wage jobs. It took lots of Google searches, studying every publication I could get my hands on in Barnes and Noble on my lunch break, and teaching myself how to build websites, design magazines, and do basic business. I was discovering how to find artists and took lots of trips to galleries and museums to promote my humble publication. There was a period of time where I even walked into galleries in person to introduce myself and handed out free copies of the magazine. As you can imagine, some were super supportive and kind, while some were suspicious or disinterested.

It took many years to build a strong community. Over time I became more and more brave and started partnering with galleries and organizations that were so out of my league, it wasn’t even funny. This forced me to level up, increase the quality of the publication and stick to my commitments. Years and years later, the magazine became my actual job. I am now proud to work with a small team of four incredible women. We work together virtually, so we don’t get to see each other very often in person, but I know each one of us is driven by the love of art and the desire to support fellow creatives, especially those new on their journey.

One of the biggest lessons I’ve learned from starting a creative business so far is that we are so much more powerful than we think. Taking responsibility for our own luck will speed up our success rate faster than waiting on some “expert” to come validate us. From my experiences, being bold and starting something will bring support faster than by wishing for it. We are definitely not meant to do this alone and there will be people on this journey that will help push your career forward, but remember that they also human and had to start somewhere just like you at one point in their life.

I used to approach influential figures in the arts with the notion that they surely must have something I don’t. I used to give myself excuses such as “I don't have rich parents, “I didn’t go to a fancy private art school,” “I don’t know how to do business” or even “I am not attractive or cool enough.” But when I took a chance on myself and got started, things began to shift, and the right people showed up with support.

The entrepreneurial path is not easy, but at the same time it’s open to anyone willing to find missing information, to fail over and over again, to have days where they have no idea what theу are doing and to try again and again until something sticks.

Building a business may not be for everyone, but I encourage you to contribute to a cause that you often think about. Maybe you found a way to do things better in the art world and want to make improvements by launching a better version of what already exists. There is more than enough room for new contributions, and I am excited to see what you create.

More than anything I want you to know that this magazine is for you. I may not get to work directly with each artist, but please know that you are always at the forefront of my mind with every new launch, article, or podcast episode.

Thank you for being a vital part of our community.

Cheers,

Kat

P.S. If you enjoy this content check out my podcast Art & Cocktails or subscribe to our glossy, colorful publication.

If you are an artist looking to get your work published, we always welcome submissions to our free blog and open calls.

Evoca1 Artist Feature | Moniker Art Fair
Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

We’re just a few short weeks away from Moniker Art Fair which will be held May 1-5, 2019 in New York City. The international fair’s 2019 exhibitors include some of the world’s most renowned urban & contemporary artists and galleries in booth exhibitions as well as solo presentations and installations. 28 exhibitors and four special projects, hailing from 13 countries around the globe, will present work in alignment with this year’s theme, Cause & Effect, which examines our shared roles and commitment to addressing the current state of political, social and ecological issues. Create! will be providing coverage of the fair, but we’re also excited to be bringing you a sneak peek at some of the artists who will be highlighted at this year’s NYC edition of Moniker. Last week we introduced you to WK Interact and this week we’re sharing the incredible work of Evoca1!

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Evoca1 was born in the Dominican Republic, where he spent most of his childhood drawing on walls and playing baseball, until eventually moving to Hollywood, Florida at age 11. 

As an autodidact, he has received his art education from the compulsive study of the old masters’ works and techniques. His pieces are a personal reflection of his life experiences, as well as observations of human behaviors and social struggles.

He currently lives and works out of South Florida, where he continues to develop his craft and research of figurative painting. In recent years, this mainly happened in public spaces where he has painted large-scale murals. His interaction with the local environments has been essential in generating the concept of his work.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

For more information about Moniker please visit their website and follow along with Evoca1 on Instagram.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

WK Interact Interview | Moniker Art Fair
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Create! Magazine is a proud partner of Moniker International Art Fair which will be held in May in New York City. Moniker shines a spotlight not only on young and emerging artists, but also on leaders in the urban and new contemporary art movement. For the forthcoming iteration of the fair, they will be highlighting one of NYC’s most recognized wheat pasting artist, WK Interact. Originally from France, WK Interact has been working in New York for over 20 years. Read our interview below to learn more about his work!

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Tell us about your background. Were you interested in art as a child or did you come to it later in life?

Well, I started to draw when I was 8 years old as my father was a painter. I think I became passionate about art from seeing him in his studio.

What brought you to New York?

I was first in New York when I was 13 years old, but did not have a chance to visit as I had only landed there for a connecting flight to Miami. I came back at age 16 in 1982 and it ended up having an incredible impact on me. My flight arrived late at night and I only knew the address of my hotel on 82nd street near Central Park. Of course, it was the cheapest place to stay and the worst hotel at $15 per night. I spent the next three months traveling all over the state using Greyhound buses and after this, I decided to focus on creating art ‘in motion’. At the age of 18, I came up with a process of making distorted images using a Xerox copy machine which helped me find my signature style. After placing many canvases in my hometown in the south of France illegally, it was obvious to me that the best city to create that sort of interaction with my work would be New York. I ended up living in the city for many years and became a french New Yorker. I’m still living there today!

How has living there affected your work?

Living in New York for me was important to just be there and connect with the city. For my work, I feel that it becomes part of an event or a corner of the street. Even I start to blend in with my work by wearing all black clothes.

Can you explain your interest in figures and your unique techniques to create your work?

My work is based on the following concept: First illustration, then the location, then the motion interacting with the scale of the building. My real motivation is film. I decide to use the street to recreate a story and take photos with people passing by. The interaction part of my concept and process is where I came up with the name WK INTERACT.

What are some of your inspirations?

Sculptors and photographers like Calder and William Klein as well as the film industry including French Connection, Blade Runner...and so many others.

What will you be exhibiting at Moniker?

I  will have one large work and 8 posters plus a large print directly installed on a wall.

Besides showing with Moniker, do you have any other projects this year you'd like to share?

Plenty of projects, but I can’t mention anything yet :)

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Moniker Art Fair has earned a reputation as one of the most exciting contemporary art fairs with it’s roots embedded in urban culture. Learn more by visiting their website or follow them on Instagram.

Moniker Art Fair | New York May 1-5, 2019
Tina Ziegler, Fair Director. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Tina Ziegler, Fair Director. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Create! Magazine is excited to be partnering with Moniker Art Fair for its 11th edition in New York this spring. Read on to learn more about what exciting things you can look forward to at this incredible contemporary art fair!

This May 1 - 5, Moniker Art Fair returns to New York, welcoming international and local collectors to a five-day celebration of New Contemporary Art in Manhattan.

Moniker Art Fair is an acclaimed contemporary art fair with urban influences, which has for 10 years delighted collectors and art lovers in both New York and London with hyper-curated, fully-immersive and broad-scope events.

The next edition, held 1 - 5 May 2019, will dominate the heart of the New York art scene in its 15,000 square-foot venue in NoHo, continuing the never-conventional, always-pioneering fair format that has launched the careers of numerous artists in the past decades in partnership with international galleries.

Moniker has become the go-to for art collectors to learn more about the contemporary art world and to buy art assured by the curation, instinct and advice of professionals.

Moniker London 2018. Photo credit: Sam Roberts.

Moniker London 2018. Photo credit: Sam Roberts.

NEW YORK EXHIBITORS LIST

INTERNATIONAL GALLERIES

GAREY THE THIRD | LA & Hong Kong

FIERCELY CURIOUS | Brooklyn

MAZEL GALERIE | Brussels & Singapore

FOUSION GALLERY | Barcelona

VINYL ON VINYL | The Philippines

ROMAN FINE ART | The Hamptons

CAKE AGENCY | Chicago, Illonois 

11.12 GALLERY | Moscow, Russia

LIVING ART GLOBAL | UK

ANALOG CONTEMPORARY | Philadelphia

PERSEUS GALLERY | New York

 

OPEN STUDIOS

SIRIS HILL | UK

FATHERLESS | Illinois

DEREK GORES | Florida

BURAK KARAVIT | Istanbul

NICK FEDAEFF | Russia

ARTHUR BECKER | New York

TXEMY & AMAIA ARRAZOLA | New York

 

SPOTLIGHT ARTISTS

EVOCA 1 | Dominican Republic

CHRISTIAN BOEHMER | Cologne

WK INTERACT | New York

ICY & SOT | Iran

YOK & SHERYO | The Philippines

ARINZE STANLEY | Nigeria

NUNO VIEGAS | Portugal

Photo credit: Icy & Sot. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Photo credit: Icy & Sot. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

FAIR SCHEDULE 2019

Wednesday 1 May 2019
Collectors Day: 3pm-7pm 
VIP Celebration: 7pm - 10pm
$75 (Includes $50 towards your first original artwork purchase)

A program of educational talks, panel discussions and networking sessions
around collecting contemporary and urban art.

Thursday 2 May 2019 
Public Opening | 1pm - 5pm 
Opening Celebration | 5pm - 9:30pm 
$25

General Fair Days
Friday 3 May | 1 - 10pm 
Saturday 4 May | 12 - 8pm 
Sunday 5 May | 11am- 6pm 
$15

STUDENTS AND SENIORS

Students can visit Moniker free of charge. A valid student ID will be required before entry.

Seniors (65+) ticket price is $10 (+booking fee) with code: REDUCED.

FAIR ACCESS

Children under the age of 16 do not need a ticket to visit the fair.

Well behaved leashed pets are welcome on site.



For more information, please visit their website: https://www.monikerartfair.com/ or follow them on Instagram.

Photo credit: WK Interact. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Photo credit: WK Interact. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Lizbeth Mitty
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Described by New York Times critic Ken Johnson as a combination of “painterly verve and hellish beauty”, the work of veteran artist Lizbeth Mitty has long been focused with examining and amplifying the intrinsic abstract beauty of deteriorating or overlooked corners of urban architecture and interiors.

Her latest endeavor ‘The Thread’ is a joint exhibition with her daughter, Dana James on view at M. David & Co. through April 14th. Taking its title from their genetic and psychosocial bond, ‘The Thread’ presents an intergenerational between two contemporary painters with independent practices yet close-knit lives, whose artwork is undeniably influenced by the presence of one another.

Born in Queens, NY to a family of artists, inventors and actors, Lizbeth was immersed in the world of visual art from a young age. Her work has been exhibited in galleries and museums in both the United States and abroad and is held in public and private collections including the The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The New York State Museum, The Orlando Museum of Art, The Zimmerli Archive, The U.S. State Department, and Trierenberg Holding AG (Austria). Her studio is based in Brooklyn, NY.

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Solo Show of Harlem artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London | April 1-13, 2019
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FACTION Art Projects is delighted to present a solo show of Harlem-based artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London. Following an exhibition of Squirewell’s work at FACTION’s Harlem space, the FACTION team is bringing him to London for a display of multilayered collages, which through elements of mythology, sacred geometry and science, tackle themes of race and memory. This marks Squirewell’s first solo show outside the US. A Private View of the exhibition will be held on April 2, 2019 from 6-9pm.

Squirewell’s newest works, which have evolved over two or three years of archival study and exploration, are heavily influenced by a recent revelation of his paternal ancestry.

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Squirewell says:

‘For most of my life I believed my family were African Americans who had arrived to the US on slave ships, and it wasn’t until my twenties that I discovered my true heritage, that they were indigenous Americans. As a teacher working closely with the national curriculum I constantly see how history, even now, is curated. My art attempts to rewrite these assumed histories. The beauty of the works capture the viewer, but it’s the ugly that intrigues and leads them to look deeper.’

Rediscovering his ancestry has prompted Squirewell to question his identity, particularly in the western hemisphere. It also speaks to his battle with the omnipresent slavery narrative, when he himself comes from a black family that is not believed to have a history of slavery. Through portraiture he challenges histories and presents a more empowering narrative for black identity, seeking to change the terminology around the very word ‘black’.

The portraits have a16th, 17th and 18th century aesthetic with a contemporary awareness. The depicted figures are both real historical figures and fictitious characters that are in some way related to the artist. Through demonstrating the misrepresentations of history, they critique what we colloquially describe as fact. Each artwork is complete only after he ceremoniously burns both the collage and its hand carved frames which include motifs and markings from ancient indigenous American and African cultures.

The titles of Stan Squirewell’s works reference particular moments in our shared history. One work entitled ‘Willendorf’, is inspired by the prehistoric female figure of ‘Venus of Willendorf’, while another, ‘Amerindian’ refers to the ‘$5 Indians’ - those who, 125 years ago, paid for falsified documents that proved them to be Native American.

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About Stan Squirewell:

Stan Squirewell was born and raised in Washington, DC and currently lives and works in Harlem, New York. His artistic training began at the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. Since graduating he has continued his tutelage under many of DC’s legends including artists Michael Platt and Lou Stovall. Squirewell, is a painter, photographer, installation and performance artist. His work is multilayered and his subject matter tackles themes such as: race and memory through mythology, sacred geometry and science. He draws his inspiration from theory books, science fiction movies and novels, avant-garde jazz and indigenous storytelling. He is a (2007 MFA) graduate of the Hoffberger School of Painting where he studied with the late, Grace Hartigan. Squirewell is the first winner of the Rush Philanthropic and Bombay Sapphire Artisan series. He has performed with Nick Cave (SoundSuits) at the National Portrait Gallery and Jefferson Pinder with G-Fine Arts. He is privately and publicly collected, his works are in the Reginald Lewis Museum, the Robert Steele Collection and recently acquired by the Smithsonian for the African American Museum (2015.) Squirewell is currently exhibited as part of ‘Fashioning the body’ at projects+gallery in St. Louis alongside Bisa Butler, Soly Cissé, Renee Cox, David Antonio Cruz, Kenturah Davis, Hassan Hajjaj, Basil Kincaid, Mario Moore, Chris Ofili, Fahamu Pecou, Katherine Simóne Reynolds, Jacolby Satterwhite, Mickalene Thomas, and Kehinde Wiley.

About FACTION Art Projects:

FACTION is a flexible collective, from the team behind the hugely successful Gallery 8 and Coates & Scarry in London, who have created a unique model for artists and gallerists to work together. FACTION addresses the changing market place and the erosion of the traditional art market, where galleries were gatekeepers for artists. FACTION provides artists with promotion and opportunity to access collectors and a wider audience, with all the support of a gallery but without the constraints of the traditional model. They aim to deliver a program of artists that is diverse and inclusive. FACTION launched in February 2018 at Gallery 8 in Harlem, New York and since then has become strongly imbedded in the Striver’s Row community and a highlight of Harlem’s cultural scene.

For more information please contact Anna Beketov, anna.beketov@damsonpr.com, +44 (0)20 7812 0645

Women Working in the Arts: Alana Voldman
Image courtesy of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London

Image courtesy of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London

For our first-ever women’s issue (available for purchase here) I profiled four young and entrepreneurial women working in the arts to highlight those not only creating work, but also those who are supporting artists as curators, gallerists, educators, writers, and more! I’m keeping this series going on our blog with this mini-interview with art consultant Alana Voldman.

Image courtesy of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London

Image courtesy of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London

Alana Voldman is an independent art consultant currently based in Antwerp, Belgium. Originally from southern California, she first relocated to Chicago to study art history at DePaul University, after which she began working with several Asian art galleries in the city. She eventually relocated to London to pursue a Master's Degree in Art Business at Sotheby's Institute of Art, with an emphasis on 20th-century art and modern design. In 2017, she relocated to Antwerp, first working as a curatorial assistant at the MoMu Fashion Museum, and now as a freelance advisory consultant and art writer for several companies and institutions. 

Choose one woman artist from history or who is working today and tell us about why she inspires you or has had an impact on you.

I have always been drawn to German-born artist Anni Albers, both for her amazing textile works and her personal story. Forced into weaving, the only workshop available to women during the early years of her art education at the Bauhaus school, she was able to transcend the medium from craft to a recognized and functional art form. In line with the Bauhaus approach to form meeting function, Albers at first explored the limitations of her materials, making objects that not only looked nice but also served a purpose.  Eventually, she became known for her distinct use of color, and 'pictorial weavings', which were essentially modernist artworks made through the process of weaving. What I really admire is her sense of persistence - she mastered something despite it not being her first choice - during a war and in a male-dominated industry no less. It is very easy to be discouraged in the art industry, especially because it can feel quite oversaturated and as if (money-making) opportunities are rare. I often remind myself of people like Albers who had to persevere under even harsher limitations.

Image courtesy of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London . Photo is by Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art

Image courtesy of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London . Photo is by Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art

Are you making the one mistake that is keeping your art from being featured?
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We’ve seen it happen time and again and artists have asked us about this when considering what to submit to our magazine or new gallery, PxP Contemporary. Think that including images from multiple series of works will double or triple your chances of being selected for that juried show, publication or gallery you’ve dreamed of showing with? Well, unfortunately, that’s not likely the case. I know that it’s tempting to want to show off the range of your style and creative ability, but here’s why this isn’t the time to do so.

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  • Demonstrate to the juror that you’ve taken time to really develop an idea, push yourself and stick to it! When you focus on one subject for a while, you get a much better idea of what works and what doesn’t and this helps you build your creative voice. Always keep in mind that submitting your work is like a leaving a first impression. If you have pieces from two bodies of work it can give off the vibe that you don’t quite know who you are yet as an artist or that you’re not confident enough in either series to commit to it fully. I’ll borrow from Kat here and say that you should always be sharing work that excites you! Which paintings, drawings, sculptures, or (insert whatever incredible work you create here) are you most excited about right now? Those are what you should be submitting!

  • Sometimes, it’s purely practical. For publications especially, it is difficult to consider an artist if we wouldn’t be able to put together a consistent spread with their work. Each book, journal, or magazine will have a distinct aesthetic so make it easy for them to know that you are the right fit and to feature your work. The same applies to a gallery, which has to make sure that your work could fill their space and look professional. They are also looking out for their collectors, who come to them specifically for their curatorial expertise. Rather than show them everything in the hopes that they end up buying something (with the risk of overwhelming them), a good dealer will work with the client to help them find something they love from a narrower selection based on their interest and budget. Collectors do often want to see a variety of works, but still within the same theme or style.

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  • If you are equally satisfied with several bodies of work at the moment, I’d still recommend only applying with one or at least one at a time. The biggest issue with this is that you’re leaving the curator to fill in the blanks and assuming that they can or will. How is someone who is not familiar with your work supposed to imagine what the rest of a series looks like when they’ve only seen a few pieces from it? You know that a whole group of works exists that are as great as the ones you’ve submitted, but the curator does not. If they have to go through hundreds or even thousands of artist submissions, they won’t always have the time to go looking through your website or Instagram account to see if you’ve made others like the one or two that they did like.

  • If you’ve recently started a new body of work that you’re wondering if you should start putting out there, make sure it’s ready. Do you have enough works from this series completed and photographed? If not, what’s the rush? There will be more opportunities to apply to. You can keep submitting from an earlier series for now if you want and if there is no restriction from the organization on how recent the work must be or simply allow yourself the time to fully dive into this great new idea.

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Of course, none of this is to say that you have to stick to the same thing forever. No, on the contrary, because it would be hard to have repeat collectors if your work never develops. Your gallery, if you have one, and your collectors simply want to see you continue to grow and will support you along the way!

If you’re making abstract sculptures, but have always wanted to try painting cats, go ahead! One of the greatest things about being an artist is having the freedom to experiment with your creativity. Ultimately, you have to DO YOU. But when it comes time to apply to that next exhibition opportunity, I hope you’ll consider the above and give yourself the best chance of being selected!

As always, both Kat and I are happy to answer any art career questions you have so please feel free to reach out to us: info@createmagazine.com or alicia@createmagazine.com and if you liked this article, check out the Art & Cocktails podcast or our new book The Smartist Guide for more tips.

Cheers and I wish you luck in applying to our current call for Issue 15 curated by Paradigm Gallery! Submit here.

-Alicia


Tiny Room For Elephants Festival in Philadelphia | April 19th-21st
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After speaking with the organizers, Create! Magazine is thrilled to be supporting TRFE and their upcoming event in April! Learn more about this exciting festival in Philadelphia that combines art, music and more below.

Tiny Room for Elephants Festival (#TRFE19) is a month long, collaborative, multi genre art and music experience, held throughout the month of April at Cherry Street Pier.  It is a living art ‘gallery’ that incorporates styles and mediums of 25+ Philadelphia artists painting/installing live from April 8th-April 17th. The finished works are celebrated on April 19th, April 20th and April 21st with live music, djs/producers, panels and interactive elements. 

The organizers, Dame & YaYa

The organizers, Dame & YaYa

The schedule of events is as follows:

Opening Exhibition 

Date: Friday, April 19, 2019

Time: 6:00pm-10pm

Fun Stuff:  Standing Room Only, A Wearable Art Show

Sounds: Camp Candle, Club Crusades, Eric Boss, Johnny Popcorn, Joshua Lang

Music Series

Date: Saturday, April 20, 2019

Time: 9:00am-9:00pm

Fun stuff:   Day Breaker (Tickets sold separately) "1000 Ways to Make It", panel moderated by Cosmo Baker; Live screen printing w/ Do It Now; Sticker Make & Take (Sticker Stampede); DIY Donut Station w/ Federal Donuts

Sounds: Aime, Cierra, Drew Mills, Emynd, Eric Boss, Expo, Femi, Jabair, John Morrison, Kayin x Sylo, Killiam Shakespeare, Kingsley Ibeneche, Mellowbastard, Pierson, Rover Rover, Shane tha Great, Suzanne Sheer, Tha Riva, The Bul Bey

Family Fun Day

Date: Sunday, April 21, 2019

Time: 12:00pm-6:00pm

Fun Stuff:  Easter Egg Hunt, World's Largest Kid's Sip n' Paint (tickets sold seperately), Sticker Make & Take (Sticker Stampede)

Sounds: Lee Jones & Friends

Sponsored in part by: YARDSPhiladelphia Weekly, HabithequeDo It Now T ShirtsFederal Donuts, Joe Werner ProductionsBlickTru WaveThe ParlorBeauMonde OriginalsChampionDWRC

Sarah Leuchtner

“Sarah Leuchtner’s practice deftly incorporates precepts of contemporary culture with a painterly approach that calls on formal relationships with the graphic, the iconographic, and the structural.”

-Bianca Bova, Curator

To create a work of art that causes the viewer to slow down to a full stop in order to spend just a bit more time with it is an accomplishment all on its own. To do the successfully twelve times over, compelling a longer examination of the surface of each piece, is something else entirely. In her recent solo exhibition at Hubbard Street Lofts in Chicago, artist Sarah Leuchtner presented twelve new paintings, filling the room with a distinct tone and palette, both moody and rich with energy. Her visual language weaves together elements of design, pattern, and palpable texture. Paint is at times washed across the canvas, and at other times appears built up, revealing pockets of layers and hidden mark making. Leuchtner’s skills in painting are only matched by her mature and distinct voice as an artist, one that can be heard cohesively throughout her body of work, and one that will only continue to resonate louder over time.

Sarah Leuchtner is a Chicago-based contemporary artist. She received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2016. Follow her on Instagram at @sarahleuchtner.

Images courtesy of Sarah Leuchtner and curator Bianca Bova.

Get noticed on Instagram!
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You may have heard that a lot of galleries, curators and writers now discover new artists that they end up representing, exhibiting or interviewing via Instagram. It’s pretty incredible that social media has created such a simple platform for sharing art worldwide. That being said, there are so many talented artists showing their work on Instagram these days that it can seem like a competition for followers and impossible to get noticed. But neither of these are true. Make sure your feed stands out for all of the right reasons!

  • Quality photography for artwork: We know, we say this all the time! As Instagram is a visual platform, it makes sense that all of your images should be high quality. However, this doesn’t mean that you have to spend hours to get a perfectly lit shot of your studio or an artfully messy image of your palette and brushes. Focus on clean, cropped photos of your work that can easily be reposted. Make it easy for others to share your work!

  • Along those lines, while it is fun to mix up the type of images that you share, like detail shots, an installation view and works in progress or even your cat, make sure you regularly show finished pieces (perhaps one of every three to five posts depending on how much work you have and how quickly you create new pieces). I came across a really incredible painting that I wanted to share on Create! Magazine’s Instagram so I went to look up the artist’s profile. I scrolled and scrolled, but could not only not find the painting I wanted - I couldn’t even find one single image of a nicely photographed, completed work cropped to the edges!

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  • Use the right hashtags: We discuss hashtags in more depth in our new book “The Smartist Guide” but the general rule is to be relevant to your work while not being too general or your posts will get lost in the mass of images. So if you make sculptures you could use #sculpture, but that has over 10 million posts and #sculptures has over 1 million. Instead you could try #sculptureart (200,000) or #sculpture_art (9,000).

  • It might be your goal to get reposted by a larger influencer account like an art blog, magazine or curator. DM-ing them to ask for a feature isn’t professional and doesn’t work (nor does random tagging unless they specifically request it!). Often, these accounts will post simple directions like using a specific hashtag on your posts for you to share your artwork with them. We look through #createmagazine regularly and love seeing the great images that the artists in our community share with us! Kat also mentioned recently on an Art & Cocktails podcast episode that Instagram doesn’t allow us to sort through all the messages that are sent to us. With the volume of DM’s we receive, after a day or two it is hard to go back and find specific ones even if it was an artist that we liked.

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  • While I can’t speak on behalf of other publications or curators, I personally don’t care what an artist’s follower count is. If I like the work, I will happy reach out for an interview or repost the work whether they have 50, 500 or 50,000 followers. There’s no need to play games by following a bunch of accounts hoping that some will follow you back and then unfollowing them a few days later. People definitely notice and will remember you in a negative light.

  • Make connections with other artists, curators, galleries and arts publications that you genuinely like. This way you can meaningfully engage with their posts. For example, if you leave a particularly nice or interesting comment on a post, it is likely that they’ll click through to your page. It pays off to be a friendly follower :)

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  • Don’t feel pressured to post new content all of the time! It’s likely that only a fraction of your followers will see any given post so if one has performed particularly well feel free to share it again a while later. Especially as you get more new followers, it is a great idea to keep putting your best work out there - you never know when a new writer or curator will end up on your feed!

  • When you do inevitably get your work shared, you can definitely repost it on your profile to be proud of your accomplishment and it’s also good practice to leave a comment thanking them for the feature. Hopefully one shared work will cause a chain reaction leading to more! That happened to Kat last year with a piece she didn’t expect and early in my career as well with a completely different type of work than what I usually made. Be patient and consistent with your posts and it will happen to you too!

Above all, none of this is important if you aren’t yet happy with your work or don’t have finished pieces to show. Put the time in your studio to get to the point where you have a really strong body of work to post about first and then trust us, the rest will follow.

Happy ‘gramming!

-Alicia

If you’d like to hear more about what writers are looking for on Instagram, you can check out the Art & Cocktails episode Kat did with our other magazine contributor Christina Nafziger at createmagazine.com/podcast.

Looking for additional career tips like these for emerging artists? We’re so excited to share our recently launched book, The Smartist Guide, which discusses topics ranging from perfecting your resume and writing the perfect pitch to a gallery you’d like to represent you to dealing with rejection and finding the best opportunities to show your work! Learn more here.


Max Cole 'Crosswinds" at Larry Becker Contemporary Art
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If you find yourself in Philadelphia before the end of the year, we highly suggest stopping by Larry Becker Contemporary Art to see their current exhibition. To be honest, it wasn’t yet on my radar when I decided to go gallery hopping on a Saturday in November. I happened to begin chatting with an artist sitting a co-op space nearby and he urged me to go over and take a look. ‘Crosswinds’ presents paintings and works on paper by American artist Max Cole. I won’t give away too much here since the owners are more than happy to tell you about this incredible artist and her work - so go see some great art and say hi to their adorable gallery cat!

Max Cole
’Crosswinds’
On view Nov 10 - Dec 29, 2018

You can follow the gallery on Facebook & Instagram.

Max Cole’s paintings suggest an approach to infinity through the use of vertical repetitive lines, a record of intense focus that is said to contain energy as embedded content. The artist describes this process, which she has worked in for over 50 years, as meditative. Though sometimes compared to the work of Agnes Martin, the similarities between the practices are superficial. “There is no other way to produce the work except for a depth of engagement requiring the abandonment of self," Cole has explained, "and this process opens the door to infinity enabling reach outside the physical. For me art must transcend the material.” Born in 1937 in Hodgeman County, KS, she received her BFA from Fort Hays State University in Kansas and her MFA from the University of Arizona in Tucson. Influenced by the Suprematist works of Kazimir Malevich during the late 1950s, she began producing paintings which reflected on time with simple forms. The artist lives and works in California. Today, Cole’s works are held the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, among others.

Artist biography adapted from Artnet.

Pulse & Scope Recap 2018
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We were so thrilled to be able to have the chance to see more fairs than usual this year. While we loved the diversity of artists represented at each of the shows that we visited, we have to give a special shoutout to Pulse and Scope for having consistent programs of top quality galleries and artists. As we walked along the aisles at both fairs, we couldn’t help but be pulled in every direction trying to take in as much of it as possible. We certainly tried to - so here are a few of our favorites!

PULSE

Andy Dixon  Toilette of Venus , 2018 Acrylic and oil pastel on canvas 59 x 47 inches Joshua Liner Gallery

Andy Dixon
Toilette of Venus, 2018
Acrylic and oil pastel on canvas
59 x 47 inches
Joshua Liner Gallery

Amy Lincoln  Sprinkler , 2018 Acrylic on panel 24 × 36 inches Project: ARTspace

Amy Lincoln
Sprinkler, 2018
Acrylic on panel
24 × 36 inches
Project: ARTspace

Kate Ballis  Lenticular II , 2017 Archival Pigment Print 39 x 59 inches Garis & Hahn

Kate Ballis
Lenticular II, 2017
Archival Pigment Print
39 x 59 inches
Garis & Hahn

Agostino Iacurci  Bust n°6 , 2018 Acrylic on canvas 59 1/10 × 39 2/5 × 1 3/5 inches M77 Gallery

Agostino Iacurci
Bust n°6, 2018
Acrylic on canvas
59 1/10 × 39 2/5 × 1 3/5 inches
M77 Gallery

Daisy Patton  Untitled (Mischievous Couple) , 2018 Oil on archival print mounted to panel 80 × 60 inches K Contemporary

Daisy Patton
Untitled (Mischievous Couple), 2018
Oil on archival print mounted to panel
80 × 60 inches
K Contemporary

Bisa Butler  The Safety Patrol , 2018 Quilted and appliquéd cotton, wool and chiffon 82 × 90 inches Claire Oliver Gallery

Bisa Butler
The Safety Patrol, 2018
Quilted and appliquéd cotton, wool and chiffon
82 × 90 inches
Claire Oliver Gallery

Daniel Handal  Java Rice Finch (Bubble Gum) , 2016 Signed, titled, dated, and numbered on label, verso Archival pigment print, painted frame (Edition of 3 + 2 APs) 19 x 15 inches Clamp Art

Daniel Handal
Java Rice Finch (Bubble Gum), 2016
Signed, titled, dated, and numbered on label, verso
Archival pigment print, painted frame (Edition of 3 + 2 APs)
19 x 15 inches
Clamp Art

Martina Lang  The Object 01 , 2017 Digital c-print 35 × 24 × 1 22/25 inches Uprise Art

Martina Lang
The Object 01, 2017
Digital c-print
35 × 24 × 1 22/25 inches
Uprise Art

 

SCOPE

Max Sansing  Stranded on Stony Island , 2018 Oil, Acrylic & Spray Paint 30 x 40 inches Line Dot editions

Max Sansing
Stranded on Stony Island, 2018
Oil, Acrylic & Spray Paint
30 x 40 inches
Line Dot editions

Fahren Feingold   WASTED MOMENTS , 2017 Watercolor 12 × 9 inches The Untitled Space

Fahren Feingold
WASTED MOMENTS, 2017
Watercolor
12 × 9 inches
The Untitled Space

Nathan Wong   NW 28 , 2018 Acrylic on canvas 72 × 60 × 1 inches Joseph Gross Gallery

Nathan Wong
NW 28, 2018
Acrylic on canvas
72 × 60 × 1 inches
Joseph Gross Gallery

Betsy Enzensberger   Glittery Rose Gold Popsicle , 2018 Resin, ink, glitter & plexi 26 × 14 × 14 inches

Betsy Enzensberger
Glittery Rose Gold Popsicle, 2018
Resin, ink, glitter & plexi
26 × 14 × 14 inches

Hélène Cenedese   Beard man #6 , 2018 Oil stick, acrylic on canvas 72 × 60 inches Galerie C.O.A.

Hélène Cenedese
Beard man #6, 2018
Oil stick, acrylic on canvas
72 × 60 inches
Galerie C.O.A.

Ulla-Stina Wikander   Just Call! , 2018 Cross stitch on found object, mixed media 5 9/10 × 7 9/10 × 7 9/10 inches Paradigm Gallery + Studio

Ulla-Stina Wikander
Just Call!, 2018
Cross stitch on found object, mixed media
5 9/10 × 7 9/10 × 7 9/10 inches
Paradigm Gallery + Studio

Gigi Mills   Laundry/Hanging Sheets with A Long Legged Dog , 2018 Oil on linen 20 × 17 inches Emmanuelle G Gallery

Gigi Mills
Laundry/Hanging Sheets with A Long Legged Dog, 2018
Oil on linen
20 × 17 inches
Emmanuelle G Gallery

5 Questions with a Curator: Eileen Owens, Philadelphia Museum of Art

We were so thrilled to be able to chat with Eileen Owens, currently a Research and Exhibitions Assistant in the European Paintings Department at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. She curated the exhibition ‘Biting Wit and Brazen Folly: British Satirical Prints, 1780s–1830s', which opened at the museum earlier this year. The show will be on view for a few more weeks, until December 5th, so we highly recommend that you go and check it out!

Connoisseurs, 1799, by Thomas Rowlandson. Hand-colored etching. Given to the Philadelphia Museum of Art by Carl Zigrosser, 1974.

Connoisseurs, 1799, by Thomas Rowlandson. Hand-colored etching. Given to the Philadelphia Museum of Art by Carl Zigrosser, 1974.

Installation view. Photo credit: Joseph Hu.

Installation view. Photo credit: Joseph Hu.

Talk about your background in art and art history. Was it something that you were always interested in growing up?

Yes and no. I grew up in the southeast of Ireland, in a medieval city that was steeped in history. I would visit Kilkenny Castle often (my sister and I could probably still recite the tour now, decades later!) and loved learning about the city’s history. So, I had an appreciation for art in a very broad sense, but I didn’t visit my first art museum until I was a 17. When I moved to New York State, my high school offered an art history class, and I was immediately intrigued--I could actually learn about all these paintings I only vaguely knew about from TV or magazines. Taking that class, and having opportunities to visit the Met and MoMA on field trips, truly unlocked something in me. It was as if I was suddenly in on this secret new world--one I felt profoundly connected to.   

Even with this passion though, the understanding that I could have a career working in an art museum came to me fairly late. It wasn’t until I studied abroad in Rome my junior year of college that I committed to adding Art History to my major. The cliché of falling in love with art in Rome is true for me. I challenge anyone to live there for three months and not contemplate how important, enlightening, and continuously relevant art is in our shared history. Not to mention the sheer thrill of seeing so much beauty in one place! It was impossible to ignore.

You went on to study at Temple University for your MA in Art History. What was your focus and what did you enjoy about the program?

I studied nineteenth-century French art, with a focus on prints and print culture. I felt really supported by the faculty at Temple. The size of the program made it easy to develop solid mentor relationships with professors and some great friendships with fellow students as well. Being in an art history program that is part a renowned fine arts school—where people are creating and exchanging ideas in real time—was really appealing to me too.

Temple’s connection to Philadelphia and its arts and culture scene was also a huge influence, not only for access to exhibitions and arts institutions, but for internships and post-grad job applications, too. Being able to capitalize on that network really helped me get my foot in the door.

Tell us about how you ended up at the PMA! That must have been an exciting transition out of grad school.

It definitely was! I was very fortunate to have gotten a fellowship right out of school and to still be working at such a valuable institution now. I was selected as the Suzanne Andre Curatorial Fellow in Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, which is a two-year fellowship that I began in 2016. In grad school, I developed a love of works on paper—how they were made, how they functioned in society, who collected them—and this was my first museum position where I got to interact directly with these objects on a daily basis. Running the department’s busy study room, preparing for acquisition meetings, completing condition reports, taking courier trips—it was all vital training in the daily tasks of a curator.  

Monster Soup Commonly Called Thames Water, Being a Correct Representation of that Precious Stuff Doled out to Us, William Heath, 1794%2F95 - 1840 Gift of Mrs. William H. Horstmann, 1955.

Monster Soup Commonly Called Thames Water, Being a Correct Representation of that Precious Stuff Doled out to Us, William Heath, 1794%2F95 - 1840 Gift of Mrs. William H. Horstmann, 1955.

As part of your two-year fellowship you had the opportunity to curate an exhibition. How far in advance did you begin planning for it, what was the process like and what did it entail?

All in all, from concept to opening day, the show was in planning for the better part of a year and a half. I started throwing around potential exhibition ideas pretty much as soon as my fellowship began. I had a standing interest in caricature, having researched French satire for my masters’ thesis.  The museum’s holding of caricature, specifically British caricature, is so rich it just made sense to showcase these fantastically funny and perpetually relevant images.

I spent a long time looking through the more than 300 British caricatures in the museum’s collection. Early on, I made the choice to focus specifically on social satire, intentionally leaving out political works that might be less relevant (or understandable) to a modern audience today. What was so revealing, and actually pretty heartwarming, was how similar our collective sense of humor is now and then. What Londoners in the 1800s found funny and what we laugh about today really hasn’t changed that much. There are so many relatable threads running through the comedy of these centuries’ old prints—from anxieties about new technologies and environmental issues to the struggle to keep up with the latest fashion.

The Gout, James Gillray, c. 1745 - 1818. Purchased with the SmithKline Beckman Corporation Fund, 1949.

The Gout, James Gillray, c. 1745 - 1818. Purchased with the SmithKline Beckman Corporation Fund, 1949.

The show has been up for several months and has been extended until December, congratulations! What are you working on now or what's next?

Thank you! It has been so fun to share the exhibition with visitors. I love sneaking in the galleries and watching people, young and old, giggling at the prints!

I was fortunate enough to stay on at the PMA once my fellowship ended. Currently, I am a research and exhibition assistant in European Painting, working with curator Jenny Thompson on an upcoming Impressionist exhibition that will open in April 2019. In addition to the exhibition, we are planning a reinstallation of the PMA’s nineteenth-century permanent collection galleries too. Both are exciting projects that I’ve really enjoyed digging into!

*Photo credit for all exhibition installation images: Joseph Hu.