Posts in Indie Publishing
Issue 17 Contents and Pre-Order Discount
COVER: BEAU DUNN

COVER: BEAU DUNN

We are pleased to announce the contents for our Fall 2019 edition, Issue 17!

Copies will be available online and at McNally Jackson, NYC, Skylight Books, Los Angeles, Charlotte St. News, London, Magma Books London (3 locations), Athenaeum Booksellers in Amsterdam, Papercut in Stockholm, Smoke Signals in San Francisco and more TBA. (www.createmagazine.com/stockists)

Pre-order your copy to get 20% off your order.

Interview with Pamela Rounis from SAD Mag
Portrait by Lauren D Zbarsky.

Portrait by Lauren D Zbarsky.

We here at Create! always love hearing about creative women entrepreneurs and especially enjoy connecting with those who work alongside us in indie publishing! After the lovely ladies from Thrive Art Studio in Canada suggested that we reach out to SAD Mag, I got in touch with one of their co-publishers, Pamela Rounis, to interview her about the Vancouver based art and design publication. Read on for her candid responses on topics including an early career pivot, establishing priorities when you have a multitude of work commitments, and what the future holds for SAD Magazine as well as the podcast she hosts, called the SADCAST.

SAD_CheeseIssue_Cover.jpg

What sparked your initial interest in art and design?

I was a creative kid, I always drew or made movies or plays, and that led me to the only logical conclusion I could think of, art school. There was no one really guiding me so I wasn’t sure what careers were available, i just figured I’d try to get into Emily Carr because that seemed like the “best” school. After graduating from Emily Carr I was faced with the stark reality of making a living in the art world. I ended up working as a gallery director for a small gallery and truly the best part of that job was creating the exhibition graphics. I didn’t have any formal design training and I did everything in photoshop! After 3 years, and no more ladder to climb in the gallery, I had to make the tough decision to go back to school for design. I went through the IDEA program at Capilano University and it changed my life. I finally felt like I was in the right place creatively. Design turned out to be a much better fit for me than fine art. I still appreciate fine art of course, and draw immense inspiration from it daily. 

What was the vision behind creating a niche art and design publication like SAD Mag? How and when did you first become involved with the publication?

SAD Mag is an independent Vancouver publication featuring stories, art, and design. Founded in 2009, we publish local contemporary and emerging artists and writers with a focus on inclusivity of voices and views. We are a non-profit and volunteer run. Our main mission is to elevate the creative scene here in Vancouver and give emerging creatives a place to get published and noticed. I started doing design for SAD around 2012 and eventually became creative director and co-publisher. When Katie Stewart (co-publisher) asked me to join SAD it seemed like mostly everyone there was a writer or photographer and none of these folks’ primary interest was design so it was a real opportunity for me to be able to change everything from the logo to the size of the magazine itself. This July, after nearly ten years, Katie, Michelle Cyca, and I stepped down as co-publishers to give a new generation the reigns. We will all remain on the board of directors, however, and I will continue to host our podcast, SADCAST. Syd Danger has taken over for me as the new creative director and co-publisher along with Madeline Barber as editor and co-publisher. 

What about your volunteer work with SAD Mag kept you engaged and excited for a decade? Can you speak to some of the challenges that you faced in the role of co-publisher?

The most exciting aspect is working with the artists, illustrators, and photographers on the creative for the magazine. It’s a lot of fun reading the pieces and matching them with the right person and briefing them on how to bring the piece to life. Each issue is themed which also brings a unique challenge, finding ways to stretch that theme across an entire issue in a way that keeps a reader’s interest. Our biggest challenge is the same as any magazine, gaining and retaining subscribers. It’s funny how many people will come to our parties and spend $30 on drinks, but don’t buy the magazine! We do have many loyal subscribers though it’s always a challenge to get the word out, especially since we’re volunteer run and sales are no one’s passion project. 

SAD_CheeseIssue2.jpg

In addition to your work with SAD Mag and hosting the SADCAST, you are also a full-time Associate Creative Director at an advertising agency. How do you maintain a sustainable work/life balance?

It’s been challenging to balance everything which is what led me to the ultimate decision to step down from most of my duties at SAD after 7 years. I think there was a lot of sacrifice that went into my being able to do everything. Certainly my husband thinks I’m a workaholic and I work most weekends. It’s not a lifestyle I would recommend and I think that’s the harsh truth about a lot of successful people. This past year I had my first panic attack and I said to myself that something needs to give, I can’t do it all even though I want to. Being promoted to ACD at Rethink came with a lot of new responsibilities also, so it just became overwhelming. I think for a lot of the time my motto was "better done than perfect". And that's really the only way things kept rolling.

Are there exciting things in store for the magazine or with your personal projects for the rest of the year that we should look forward to?

I am very excited to see what Syd and Maddy do with the magazine. The next issue, their first as co-pubs, is appropriately themed Future and it’s definitely one to watch out for. Meanwhile, I’m going to try to make the SADCAST better than ever, and take it a bit easier!

By Alicia Puig

Portrait by Lauren D Zbarsky.

Embracing The Weird, Wild and Wonderful (Podcast Interview with Shelby McFadden)

On this episode of Art and Cocktails, Kat chats with graphic designer Shelby McFadden about her creative journey, falling in love with design, and eventually leaving her 9-5 to pursue her dreams. Shelby is a designer, founder and editor of Pikchur Magazine and the designer for Create! Magazine. Shelby also talks about the inspiration behind her new magazine, what inspires her and offers branding tips for creatives.

Shelby McFadden is a graphic designer, illustrator, and entrepeneur who resides in a small town located between Baltimore, Annapolis, and Washington D.C. She graduated from Kutztown University of Pennsylvania in 2011 with a BFA in Communication Design with a concentration in Graphic Design and Advertising Design. She has a passion for art and design, and she feels imagination and creativity are what feeds the soul. With her mom’s influence, she grew up loving all things weird, nerdy and... “old.” Movies like Star Wars, Fright Night and Labyrinth are her top favorite movies to watch on repeat. You can often find her listening to David Bowie, The Rolling Stones, or 80’s artists like The Cure and Echo & the Bunnymen. Her favorite time of year is fall and Halloween season, and she is a big collector in Halloween antiques. For fun, she browses antique shops and yard sales, reads tarot cards to her friends, and plays Super Nintendo. She finds her interests influence her work and her love for everything weird, wild, and wonderful.

Highlights in Indie Publishing: Pikchur Magazine

Shelby McFadden is a graphic designer, illustrator, and entrepreneur who resides in a small town located between Baltimore, Annapolis, and Washington D.C. She graduated from Kutztown University of Pennsylvania in 2011 with a BFA in Communication Design with a concentration in Graphic Design and Advertising Design. She has a passion for art and design, and she feels imagination and creativity are what feeds the soul. With her mom’s influence, she grew up loving all things weird, nerdy and... “old.” Movies like Star Wars, Fright Night and Labyrinth are her top favorite movies to watch on repeat. You can often find her listening to David Bowie, The Rolling Stones, or 80’s artists like The Cure and Echo & the Bunnymen. Her favorite time of year is fall and Halloween season, and she is a big collector in Halloween antiques. For fun, she browses antique shops and yard sales, reads tarot cards to her friends, and plays Super Nintendo. She finds her interests influence her work and her love for everything weird, wild, and wonderful.

www.pikchurmag.com 

Screen Shot 2018-05-03 at 4.20.28 PM.png

You have a background in art and design. What inspired you to start Pikchur Magazine?

I have worked professionally as a graphic designer for nearly a decade. I am very fortunate to work in a field that allows me to be creative and help others to become successful in their personal and professional endeavors. However, the difference, in my opinion, between being a graphic designer and being an artist, is that graphic design can sometimes limit your creative freedom. It can strip away at your creative spirit, and the end result isn’t always a reflection of you, because you’re designing for the client and not for yourself. I grew up as an artist. Everything I created in my sketchbooks was 100% controlled by my thoughts, feelings and emotions. Since graduating from college nearly a decade ago, I have been so engrossed in work and design, I realized I forgot what it was like to draw and illustrate for myself. What I love most about drawing is sitting with a blank piece of paper and a pencil and no one can tell me to set limits or boundaries. I can create anything I want from the abyss of my imagination. I forgot about my “weird side,” as I like to call it. The side that was me. The side that David Bowie taught me it was okay to be different. The side that said you can be a weirdo and dress-up with zombie makeup and go to Walmart with your friends for something to do. The side of me that missed escaping the real world and diving into my sketchbook to explore the many realms of my imagination. I missed being an artist. With over five years of editorial experience, I knew I wanted to create a publication that will inspire others and bring people together. I wanted to share my personal love for the strange and bizarre, and embrace the side of me that fell dormant for some time. I want PIKCHUR Magazine to be a place where people from around the world can embrace their “weird side” and aren’t afraid to be themselves. I want to create an art community where up-and-coming artists and professional artists can discover and inspire one another. One of my favorite things to hear are artists reaching out and telling us thank you for what you are doing, because we could introduce them to other artists and get inspired. I love that. PIKCHUR Magazine is a publication that sets zero limitations to creativity and imagination. Be as weird, wild, or wonderful as you want your art to be. Without anyone saying, no.

Share your creative journey with us briefly.

My creative journey started when I was really little. I have pictures of myself under the age of four years old painting and coloring at my family’s kitchen table. I was always that person who created comics about me and my friends in spiral bound notebooks. I am pretty sure my school notes were more illustrations and less note taking. I was voted “most artistic” in school, always going above and beyond on school projects, and getting excited about art class instead of physics or mathematics. I was fortunate enough to receive art scholarships for school and my projects were nominated for design awards. I went to a fantastic University and was taught design by talented design professors. After I graduated, I worked for several large and small companies, working on an array of projects, from branding large shopping malls and mixed-media establishments all around the world, to creating patterns for tech accessories sold in large-scale retail stores in the United States. I somehow evolved from the little girl sitting in a high-chair painting on paper, to a professional graphic designer who now owns her own design company. I consider my creative journey a rough road. My self-esteem was on a teeter-totter for many years, full of highs and lows. I never knew how my days working as a designer would go when I stepped through the office doors at 8:30AM. I met challenges through work and the people I worked with. I listened to criticism and I stood behind my opinions. I listened to sexist remarks by men who fueled their egos and I comforted peers who were bullied by female art directors on power trips. However, I wouldn’t change the rough road for a smooth-paved highway. It gave me the drive to quit working for someone else, and start working for myself. In the early months of 2016, I began freelancing, which later turned into my design company. I’ve built relationships with new clients I love and learned a lot along the way.

P1090084.jpg

Why do you think print media is relevant and important in today’s digital world? What draws you to it personally?

Print media, what I believe, will always be around. I think people were nervous it would die-off now everyone owns a smartphone or tablet of some kind, but I believe there are people out there, who still prefer turning pages than scrolling up with their finger. Print and digital are two different experiences. Print is more personal. It’s like talking to someone in person over a cup of coffee versus talking to them over facetime. It’s the energy of being face to face with someone that makes the conversation experience different. One of my favorite past times is going to the local Barnes & Noble, grabbing a stack of magazines, and sitting in the cafe with a cup of coffee. Though, the cost of print is far more expensive than downloading an entire publication instantaneously, I will always be the person who collects print materials, whether it be magazines, stickers, journals, or posters. I love holding something in my hands and feeling the textures of the materials, and even stumbling upon it on a coffee table or on my computer desk and feeling the excitement all over again.

Messages Image(1143728149).jpeg

 What should readers expect from upcoming issues of the magazine? 

I think this issue will come as a shock to a lot of readers, as it is our first issue of PIKCHUR Magazine... and it looks so damn good! Our team has been working really hard, and I am SO excited about it! I really wanted each issue to tell it’s own story and I think we really nailed it. Not only a chance for us to showcase really awesome work from other artists, but for us to really have fun with the layouts and the flow of each page, while also maintaining consistency.

Name a few of your favorite print publications.

Aside from Create! Magazine being at the top, I am also a big fan of popular magazines such as: Juxtapose, Hi-Fructose and Bon Appetit! Some of my favorite indie magazines include: Lunch Lady, Frankie, and Popshot Quarterly. I also recently discovered So Young Magazine, an awesomely illustrated, new music magazine!

Issue IX Contents and Preorder

The much anticipated 9th edition of our magazine is almost here! See the full list of contents below and reserve your copy. 

Issues will also be available in the following locations in mid-late April 2018: 

McNally Jackson
52 Prince St
New York, NY 10012

Charlotte Street News
66 Charlotte St, Bloomsbury
London W1T 4QE, UK

Magma Clerkenwell
117-119 Clerkenwell Road
London EC1R 5BY, UK

Magma Covent Garden
29 Shorts Gardens, Covent Garden
London WC2H 9AP, UK

Magma Manchester
24 Oldham Street, Northern Quarter
Manchester M1 1JN, UK

Athenaeum Nieuwscentrum
Spui 14-16
1012XA Amsterdam
Netherlands

On the Cover: 

Kaylee Dalton

Interviews

Sara Anstis
Dina Brodsky
Pippa Dyrlaga
Michael Kalmbach
Gillian King
Csilla Klenyanszki
MAG
Chloe McCarrick
Daniel Mullen  

Highlight Artists

Danielle Krysa 

Friends in Indie Publishing

Q&A with KT Browne, Editor of Iceview Magazine  

Selection by The The Jealous Curator

Kaetlyn Able
Mark Bradley-Shoup
Claire Brewster
Anne Canfield
Ying Chew
Kaylee Dalton
Stephen DOnofrio
Brian Fouhy
Ron Geibel
Gemma Gené
JoAnn Goodman
Marisa Green
Michelle Heslop
Meghan Hildebrand
Tracy Kerdman
Sara Khan
Nic Koller
David Linneweh
Brandi Marie Little
Huntz Liu
Jemma Lock
Susannah Montague
Lauren Munns
Leah Pantea
David Pirrie
Amy Ross
Seth Smith
Cheryl Sorg
Zandra Stratford
Clare Szydlowski
Ingrid Wells
Sally West
Sarah Winkler 

Highlights in Indie Publishing: DOG Magazine

As an independent magazine, we are always curious to learn how other publishers operate. Join us as we select a few of our favorite creative titles and pick their brains about their projects. We hope that these features inspire you to create your own zine, book or blog! 

DOG is a modern lifestyle magazine exploring the presence and influence of dogs and their owners in society. Each issue centers on a common topic and explores the meaningful interactions and love of individuals and their dogs through photographic portfolios, interviews, personal essays, informative material on breeds and creative content.

Personal, visual, poetic, current and innovative, DOG offers original content and a new perspective to dog lovers and owners. Content for DOG will come from a variety of creative sources mirroring the diversity of dog owners and lovers. Submissions from emerging or established photographers, designers, illustrators, writers, designers, makers and visual artists, and any dog owner, give DOG a fresh vision of what dog mean to humans. 

DOG SQ-6.jpg

What initially inspired your publication?

My passion for independent magazines was how things started, I wanted to be involved in any way and someone suggested start our own magazine. Then the next question was, a magazine about what? I looked around and saw my dogs and questioned, what about a dog magazine? And that is how everything started.

DOG SQ-7.jpg

As an indie magazine, we are always excited to learn about what goes into the production of each issue. How do you gather content and decide on what dogs to feature?

We look at two elements when it come which breed to feature next, first its origin, it is interesting place to visit?  Will people would like to read about it? And second does the dog has an interesting story line?  When those two elements come together, we got our cover girl/boy.

DOG SQ-11.jpg

Tell us about your team. How many people typically contribute to each edition? 

Officially we have three in our pack. 
We are a very small team , we have our Editor Emily Rogers, our Editorial Assistant Hannah FitzSimons and me, who puts the magazine together. Then we have collaborators from around the word like  writers, illustrators and Photographers.
 
What do you hope the readers take away from DOG?

We want our readers to have fun with our magazine, to read what we write and to learn a bit more about dogs, specially about the specifics of each breed. Sometimes people get dogs just because they look cute without knowing the dog’s temperament or other characteristics that might not be suitable for your lifestyle.

issue 3.jpg


 
What is your favorite part about publishing a magazine? 

My favorite part about publishing a magazine is that I get to work with so many creative people, people around the world who somehow have inspired us with their work. 
 
What advice would you give someone who wants to get into indie publishing? 

My advice will be to be different, have a strong concept, do your research , look for similar magazines are out there and see what they are doing, and then do it even better. Create content that has a meaning and a reason behind it. 

DOG SQ-3.jpg

What are you looking forward to the most in 2018?

When we get our two issues printed. That is our highlight of the year, to see it in front of us.