Posts tagged Art
Paradigm Gallery at Art on Paper 2019

For their fourth showing at Art on Paper, Paradigm Gallery will be presenting artwork by Alex Eckman-Lawn, Drew Leshko, Evan Hecox, Hyland Mather, and Seth Clark. The artists have all created their artwork using their own unique methods, but will be coming together for a fair display not to miss. Click on the artist names below to see their collections. The newest pieces by each artist will be added to their linked collection pages on Friday, March 8th. Email sara@paradigm-gallery.com if you would like to see a preview of the collections prior to that date.

Paradigm Gallery | Booth 105 | Featured Artists
Alex Eckman-Lawn
Drew Leshko
Evan Hecox
Hyland Mather
Seth Clark

Fair Dates/Hours/Location
March 7 - 10, 2019 | 299 South Street - Pier 36, Downtown Manhattan

OPENING NIGHT
Art on Paper Preview
Thursday, March 7, 2019 • 6:00pm to 10:00pm

PUBLIC FAIR HOURS
Friday, March 8 • 11:00am to 7:00pm
Saturday, March 9 • 11:00am to 7:00pm
Sunday, March 10 • 12:00pm to 6:00pm 

Podcast: Giving a Voice to Artists with Christina Nafziger
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On this episode of Art & Cocktails, Kat introduces you to Christina Nafziger who frequently contributes to Create! Magazine. We chat about working in the arts, studying in London, navigating side hustles and more. Christina shares her journey so far and gives insights to help artists get more press. 

Christina is a freelance writer, journalist, and editor focusing on contemporary art and visual culture. She regularly contribute to Sixty Inches From Center and Create! Magazine. Her writing writing has also been published in places like THE SEEN: Chicago’s International Online Journal of Contemporary & Modern Art, and Exhibitions on the Cusp.

Christina received her BA in Art History from Herron School of Art & Design and my MA in Contemporary Art Theory from Goldsmiths University of London, where her research focused on performativity within photography as well as the imprint of digital image archiving on memory and identity. Her current research centers on gender performativity within virtual platforms and the development of alternative spaces as a means of reimagining identity and reclaiming agency.

Work by  Sara Anstis

Work by Sara Anstis

Helga, A Film by Making Art and Bo Bartlett

Making Art (Jesse Brass) and Bo Bartlett just released a short film worth checking out.

American artist Andrew Wyeth secretly made over 240 drawings and paintings of one model between 1971 and 1985. The secret was kept even from his wife. When the story broke, it was a national sensation gracing the covers of Time and Newsweek. The model was Helga Testorf.

This is the story told for the first time by Helga.

“Helga Testorf, a middle-aged woman in pigtails who was Mr. Wyeth’s neighbor in rural Pennsylvania, has the curious distinction of being the last person to be made famous by a painting.”

-James Gardner, Art Critic

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“He was at a point in his career where he had to produce, produce … and along came this free spirit, running over the hills … he thought he was chasing himself, because that’s what he did as a boy, running over the hills. He was always painting himself in me.”

- Helga Testorf

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Watch more from Making Art at makingarfilms.com

Madison Parker
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In 2013, Madison Parker or “MADPICS", graduated from the Art Academy University with a BFA in Photography. Her college years in San Francisco set the trajectory for her to move to LA to pursue the entertainment industry, an almost gravitational pull for any photographer. There she interned and assisted for photographer, Art Streiber. Learning the ins and outs of the industry, she decided to relocate to San Diego, where she currently works and resides.

While my diploma may be camera-centric, my heart is anything but. I revel in the wonder of exploring all mediums as ways to capture the feelings, ideas, people, and moments that make up life. I embrace creative challenges, encouraging change. The world around me, something wild yet comforting to behold... something you really need to open your eyes to. I've been lucky enough to grow up in an environment that has inspired me throughout life to try and capture everything I find enticing- whether it be the way sunlight leaks through a window, the shapes of shadows, or what lurks between what we can and cannot see.

Madeline Zappala

Madeline Zappala is a Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist driven towards creating conceptual archives of our digital experiences. She received her MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts/Tufts University after studying American Culture at Vassar College. Her work is largely informed by her background in photography and her interest in the intersection of collective cultural consciousness, technology and identity. Her recent projects rely on generative and conceptual writing methods to extract alternate narratives hidden in everyday digital interactions.

Mental Health For Artists: Podcast Interview with TJ Walsh

On this episode of Art & Cocktails, artist and psychotherapist TJ Walsh shares his story, how he found his way back to painting and the moment that inspired him to help others through therapy. TJ talks about overcoming emotional difficulty, depression, creative burnout and offers practical insight for creatives going through a hard time. We discuss his approach to painting and recent exhibition as well.

Bio

TJ Walsh, BFA, MA is a Counselor/Psychotherapist, Painter, Art and Higher Education Administrator. Prior to receiving his M.A. in Clinical Counseling Psychology from Eastern University in Saint Davids, PA, TJ received his BFA in Graphic Design from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia.

TJ has deep experience working with young adults, university students and young couples with a focus on artistic and creative personalities. He typically works with young couples who are struggling to connect with one another and individuals who find themselves stuck in place. In addition to his work in group and private practice, TJ is a seasoned Student Affairs/Student Life professional with foci in the areas of Counseling, Conduct/Judicial Affairs, Title IX.

Originally trained psychodynamically, TJ has since obtained or is working toward certification in Emotionally Focused Therapy, as well as Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). No matter the therapeutic theory that may be running through his mind, the primary focus is to build a strong, therapeutic alliance and to instill hope in the person(s) who sits across from him so that they may live a life worth living.

TJ writes and speaks about topics of art, culture, faith & mental health. His work has been exhibited and published internationally. He is on faculty at Eastern University in the graduate school's Counseling Psychology department teaching Personality and Psychosocial Assessment and Psychopathology.

Statement

TJ Walsh explores the inner realm of the subconscious through abstract paintings. As he states, "This work focuses on the hidden conversations that course through the undercurrent of our minds, unconsciously giving form to who we are as human beings. I work fast letting my emotion and intuition drive the painting. It is through this process that I hope beauty reveals itself.

For other artists, beauty is revealed through striving for technical perfection. These artists desire to make any sign of the human creator disappear. For me, the opposite is true. I want my hand to be very evident in the work for it's the human experience, the struggle, the failures, the successes, which is most beautiful to me.

The process of creating is an intimate practice. Art making is a meditative, reflective, physical, emotional and spiritual practice. Creating something that comes out of ourselves, releasing part of us into the world to be experienced by others is something that many people in our culture do not experience. This intimate practice of pulling from within and connecting with the deepest parts of our beings is beautiful because it's natural, pure and uninhibited. It's being human on on of its most raw levels."

Links:

Instagram: @tjwalsh 

Private Practice: www.tjwalshtherapy.com

Art site: www.tjwalshartist.com

Exhibition:

TJ’s exhibition will open on December 8 at Darlington Arts Center

www.darlingtonarts.org




Ewelina Skowronska

Ewelina Skowronska is a visual artist and printmaker, who was born in Poland and currently lives and works between London and Tokyo. After having an accomplished career in advertising, Ewelina decided to fully dedicate herself to art in 2013. She retrained and specialised in visual arts at University of The Arts London where she graduated with distinction in 2015. Ewelina’s work continues to explore the interplay between colour, shape, perspective and pattern. Her work is usually between the abstract and the figurative.

Ewelina's work has been exhibited in London, Ireland, Poland and Tokyo. In 2017, she was awarded with Print Prize by ST Bridge Foundation;. her prints are in the collection of VA Museum London; she was shortlisted for RA Summer Show 2017, and for the Ashurst Emerging Artist Prize 2018.


Statement

My interest lies in developing a contemporary dialogue between form and colour, art, illustration, and graphic arts. It means carrying on the tradition of the post-modern, while re-thinking my own approach and aesthetics to it. Recently, I am very much interested in the human perception, its particularities, and the subjective burden associated with it. For me the act of perceiving always implies creating. 

I use mostly screen-printing as a medium. I am fascinated about ways of pushing its boundaries, wondering how the process of mark making together with all limitations can influence the artwork and at the end tell the story. With strong design and illustration background, my art practice focused on a strong sense of colour play and form, exploring the line between the abstract and the figurative. I am inspired by everyday human experiences and the fluidity and movement of the human body.  

As I am currently based in Japan, I see how its culture influences my work, bringing new ideas, ways of seeing, as well as new skills, like ceramic practise. 

Order the Art Miami 2018 Edition!

Create! Magazine Issue 12 | Art Miami 2018 Edition 

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Please allow 2-3 weeks for domestic delivery and 3-5 weeks internationally. 

(Ships after on or December 9th)

Pre-sale price valid until November 30, 2018

 

180+ ad-free pages of interviews and features with established, mid-career and emerging contemporary artists for you to discover and be inspired by!

Issue 12 Contents


On The Cover 

 

Madison Parker

 

Interviews



Waves, Waterscapes and Wanderlust 

Interview with Artist Nina Brooke 

By Alicia Puig 

 

Postgraduate Plans 

Interview with Emerging Artist Rosabel Rosalind Kurth-Sofer 

By Alicia Puig 

 

James Bullough 

The Voices of Street Artists 

By Christina Nafziger 

 

Edra Soto 

Creating Community Through Artistic Practice 

By Christina Nafziger 

 

Reimagined and Remembered 

Interview with Charlotte Keats 

By Ekaterina Popova 

 

Standing up for Women Artists 

Interview with Liezel Strauss, Art Girl Rising 

By Ekaterina Popova 

 

A Glimpse into Another’s World 

Interview with Anna Shukeylo 

By Ekaterina Popova 

 

Spot on 

Neo-Pointillism by Pj Linden 

By Alicia Puig 

 

Adam D. Miller and Devon Oder Creating a Gallery Through an Artist’s Perspective 

By Christina Nafziger 

 

The Beauty and Complexity of the Natural World 

Interview with Alonsa Guevara 

By Ekaterina Popova



Art Miami Fairs Highlight Exhibitors

 

A unique perspective from galleries exhibiting at Art Miami Fairs 2018

 


Artists Selected by Guest Curator, Kaly Scheller-Barrett, Associate Director of Hashimoto Contemporary

 

Stacey Beach

Isabel Chun

Ben Dallas

Scout Dunbar

Lesley Gold

Raul Gonzalez

Erica Green

Elizabeth Jung

Thomas Kelley III

Lydia Kinney

Huanying Koh

Forrest Lawson

Megan Magill

Amy Meissner

Aly Morgan

Hedda Neelsen

Yuria Okamura

Madison Parker

Anastasia Parmson

Diane Pribojan

Sara Allen Prigodich

Meganne Rosen

Molly Scannell

Lindsey Schulz

Max Seckel

Val Shamma

Anne Cecile Surga

Andrea Taylor

Anna Teiche

Sophie Treppendahl

Charlotte Urreiztieta 

Jimmy Viera

Ellie Ji Yang

Madeline Zappala

Angie Zielinski

Spotlight Artist

 

Andrew Salgado

 

Highlight Artists

 

Andre Bogart Szabo

Valentina Sarfeh

Ambera Wellmann Exhibition Opening at Projet Pangée

Artist: Ambera Wellmann

Exhibition title: (Wo)man and Beast in the Round of Their Need 

Opening: Thursday, October 11, 2018, 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Exhibition: October 11 to November 17, 2018             

Ambera Wellmann is a Canadian artist working in painting, assemblage, photography and video. Wellmann graduated from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (2011) and earned her MFA from the University of Guelph, Ontario (2016). She is the recipient of the Joseph Plaskett award (2016) and the recipient of the RBC Canadian Painting Award (2017). Her works have been exhibited at the Power Plant, Toronto, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, and the National Gallery of Canada. She currently lives and works in Berlin. Wellmann gratefully acknowledges the support from the Canada Council of the Arts. In this recent series of paintings, Wellmann continues her investigation of porcelain as a bodily substitute and a vehicle for perversion, manipulating the sensuality of painted surfaces to blur the distinctions between material and flesh. Wellmann’s paintings hybridize a range of canonical motifs, transposing the grandiosity of historical figuration into intimately realized, darkly humorous works.

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Feminist Ceramics: Podcast Interview with Jen Dwyer

On this episode of Art and Cocktails, Kat interviews Jen and learns about her creative journey, the inspiration behind her latest ceramics and her upcoming exhibition in NYC. Kat and Jen chat about overcoming creative fear, taking risks and self care. 

Jen Dwyer is a ceramicist artist who makes socially engaged ceramic sculptures and functional art objects. 

Upcoming Exhibitions: 

Not For Your Bunny, Lucas Lucas Gallery, opening Oct 18 6-9pm (On view through Nov 18, 2018). Co-curated by Stacie Lucas and Nathalie Levey.

Femme, Juxtapoz at the new brick and mortar gallery and bookstore in Jersey City (March 1st, 2019)

www.jen-dwyer.com

 

On Curating: Podcast Interview with Margaret Winslow, the Curator of Contemporary Art at the Delaware Art Museum
Photo by  Lindy Powers

Photo by Lindy Powers

Join us for a fun and informative conversation with Margaret Winslow, the Curator of Contemporary Art at the Delaware Art Museum. Margaret shares her journey of becoming a curator, offers advice for those interested in pursuing museum or curatorial work and shares tips for interested in getting a museum exhibition.

Margaret Winslow currently lives and works in Wilmington, Delaware where she is the Curator of Contemporary Art at the Delaware Art Museum. Margarethas curated for the Neuberger Museum of Art and The Delaware Contemporary and assisted with exhibits for the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. Her recent exhibitions at the Delaware Art Museum include Dream Streets: Art in Wilmington 1970–1990Retro-Active: Performance Art from 1964–1987Anne Truitt: Luminosities, and Once Upon a Time in Delaware: In Quest of the Perfect Book, the most recent installment of Nina Katchadourian’s Sorted Booksproject. In 2010, she attended Independent Curators International’s Curatorial Intensive in New York and in 2015, she served as juror for Art of the State: Pennsylvaniaat the State Museum of Pennsylvania. Margaretholds a B.A. in Art History from the University of Mary Washington and an M.A. in Modern and Contemporary Art, Theory, and Criticism from SUNY Purchase College.

Resources:

https://www.delart.org
http://www.mdartplace.org
https://www.nationalservice.gov/programs/americorps

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Addressing Social Issues Through Art: Amy Scheidegger Ducos

By Sarah Mills

I earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting & Drawing from East Carolina University in 2005 and a Masters of Science in Arts Administration from Drexel University’s graduate program in 2010. 

Originally from North Carolina, I relocated to Philadelphia in order to join the Drexel graduate program to pursue a more multi-faceted role in the world of art and culture.

In 2011, I founded the Artistic Rebuttal Project – a grass roots art advocacy initiative that strives to, through story-collecting and story-telling, emphasize the power and necessity of the arts. On the project’s behalf, I periodically travel around the country speaking with university students in art programs, creative adults and kids, imploring them to become active in their communities in order to better serve the places in which they are rooted. It is only when the public knows the importance of art and art’s way of connecting our past to our future, can the arts act as a civic lesson to citizens everywhere. That same year, I was nominated a Creative Connector, a recognition pioneered by Leadership Philadelphia. Creative Connectors are “hubs of trust, seen as trustworthy and credible who use art and design to mobilize people around an issue.” 

In March of 2017, I moved to Quito, Ecuador to study how arts and culture are managed and appreciated in an older, foreign country. Living here, I am able to carve out a lot more time to create my own work.

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My work is largely social issues-centered, ranging from global warming, mental health, immigrant rights to body positivity.

My recent body of work was sparked by a myriad of issues that were once at the center of a progressive government and leadership - broadening women’s issues and mental health policies, immigrant rights, LGBTQ rights, and confronting police brutality and many more - that are now being rolled back by an administration run by greed and ignorance.

Now that I am living abroad in Ecuador, I am seeing these issues from what is considered a third world country. In this third world country, the class of person who would be considered the minority in the States is the majority that runs the country. In turn, women and the poor are treated on the whole and with a lot more respect in my particular third world country than the United States. 

My intent with the images enclosed is to explore the experiences I’m having watching and learning how Ecuador deals with these issues in contrast to my country of origin.

My work is created through a variety of mediums. I work initially with graphite and ink on paper as a first layer, then watercolor and acrylic on paper, as well as non-traditional materials like coffee (from the Galapagos). After scanning in these traditional/non-traditional mediums, I inject more color and detail digitally, creating a digital painting using a tablet.

www.amyartisticrebuttal.com

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How did you first start creating?

I first started drawing when I was 2 years old and I haven’t stopped! My mom saved everything (including the attached photo what "what mommy looks like when I'm bad"), put me in every after-school art class my parents could afford, art teachers from elementary to high school (I was lucky enough to have art classes every year) all encouraged and nurtured my inherent urge to make art and it blossomed into a skill that I’ve sharpened throughout the years.

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Travel obviously plays a big role in your work, can you talk about your experience and the impact it had?

I didn’t travel much until I was 17 - the first time I ever got on an airplane. But since that first flight, I’ve tried my best to see and experience as much as I could afford. As fate may have it, I met an extraordinarily kind man from Ecuador while we were both earning advanced degrees in Philadelphia, PA. Pedro, by the end of his student visa, had to return to Ecuador, so after about 2 years of dating and living together in Philly, we took the leap of faith that we were going to work out and I moved to Ecuador with him in 2017. The shift to a completely different culture where I was now the minority took a long time to adapt to. In the States, I felt like things were “made” for me. Everything was in English, almost everything on tv and online is marketed towards women because women do the shopping...like the world catered to me and I had access to everything I needed, even when money was tight. And I wasn’t rich by any means - I grew up lower middle class in a very rural town. Once I moved out of state I had my struggles not being able to find full-time work after I got my Masters in Arts Administration and yet I feel I excelled because the society I was in was some-what tailored to help me, a young white woman, succeed. Therefore, to be taken out of that environment and placed in a city where I couldn’t understand one conversation being had on the street, needing my fiance to tag along everywhere I went to translate, I ultimately, after 9 months needed to fly back to the States because I had overstayed my time Ecuador without getting the proper documentation. I was a legit illegal immigrant for 5 of those 9 months. (Americans can stay in Ecuador for 4 months until needing to register with the government and we had a crap lawyer who didn’t do her job). It gave me a completely new look at the America I grew up in and I have to tell you, it’s not a positive new look. I think my South American now-husband and I are lucky to not be living in the United States at this specific point in time. We would be in constant fear that his status would be in question and that we might be separated. I have learned that all Latin Americans - from Mexico to Chile to Spain - are all lumped together when Americans in power talk about them. When the current administration started calling Mexicans rapists and Venezuelans criminals as they stood in line for asylum at the border, I listened as my husband, an Ecuadorian, called all of them “his people” as he watched in agony as the United States continued to perpetuate harmful myths, vow to deport them all, and separated children from their parents. And for me, who has always had art as a form of therapy, expression, and retreat, my subject matter naturally becomes a portrayal what I’m feeling in response to my husband and his family’s current state of shock surrounding what the United States has become - for them. I can always return and I have thousands of good memories of growing up in North Carolina and finding my voice in Philadelphia. America will always be my home but when you’ve never lived outside if it, you don’t know the true impact and role it plays as far as what direction the rest of the world is headed. As Mark Twain once wrote - “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.”

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Much of your work involves observations on social, political, and cultural events, how did you get started creating this type of work?

My first major move, long before I moved to Ecuador, was moving from North Carolina to Philadelphia - which completely opened my eyes to how different races are treated across the country. I grew up in a somewhat mixed community, had friends of all colors, but we were in a rural town where law enforcement (from the point of view of a teenager who maybe wasn’t clued into politics quite yet) was community-led, everybody knew everybody. So there was a sense of justice and fairness spanning all ethnicities because if you were caught doing something you shouldn’t have been, no matter the color of your skin, the town sheriff knew your momma and knew she raised you better. Once I got to Philadelphia, things couldn’t have been more different. Avoiding eye contact with strangers was paramount because if you did say hello, more often than not it would turn into a creepy guy trying to follow you home from the subway or an arrogant man feeling entitled to let you know your tattoos are “unbecoming of a lady” and “your job should fire you” for letting one peek out underneath your shirt sleeve. And because none of those experiences are against the law, sometimes you have absolutely no one to turn to. From rural North Carolina where you go from home to car, to work, back to the car, back home, to Philadelphia where you feel you’re exposed on a regular basis - I became very hardened myself yet very aware of what women and men of color are subjected to on the daily. I could endure someone talking shit about my tattoos or my weight on the bus, at least I was never spat on because of the hijab being worn, or followed around a drug store simply because my skin was black and I was wearing a hoodie. Living in such proximity to racial profiling and racial biases has made me more empathetic and aware that racism is alive and well - and that I’m always working on my own biases that I wasn’t fully aware of having grown up in the South. That emotional work shows up in my artwork now - that idea from Mark Twain about travel, I’ll amend it to say that proximity is also fatal to prejudice. If you can SEE what happens to people of different races and backgrounds and be able to compare that to how you’re treated - your world will be flipped on its head if you think equality or equity has been reached in any way shape or form.

What is your favorite part of your creative practice?

My favorite part is I guess what you would call the middle part, where idea meets reality. Once you’ve conceived an idea and you begin sketching it - for me the first few sketches are never what I had envisioned in my head, but by the 3rd or 4th, it starts coming out the way it should. So when I’m able to step away from my work and say “YES! That’s what I was going for,” I get really excited to keep going and finish.

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How has making art impacted your life?

That’s a difficult question, considering I’ve never NOT had art as a critical part of my life and being. I would say, having this ability has been the greatest gift, no doubt, but it has also been the root of some sadness as well. I’m currently writing a children’s book about my childhood where I was used for my skills and then discarded when my skills/I myself wasn’t “needed” anymore. Or times in my life where I wished I could have spoken my mind instead of keeping quiet at the moment and instead of painting about it later. Both are valid ways of communicating but I think I always wanted to be more vocal but didn’t know how which is something that maybe comes with age and experience. My voice is a lot larger than it ever has been - my family can attest to that - and now that I’m almost 35 I’m finding a better balance between speaking vocally and speaking through my artwork.

What is a piece of advice that was given to you that you would like to share with our readers?

The main thing for me, when I was in art school, I had a teacher named Mr. Hartley, who has since passed, but he told me being an artist had nothing to do with talent: it was all about practice and sharpening your skills. I had a lot of people tell me when I was growing up that I’ll be an artist, no doubt, it’s a talent I was born with and I shouldn’t waste it. But the work you have to put into it is NOT something the average person realizes. The amount of artwork that doesn’t see the light of day because it’s not up the artists’ ridiculously high standards is not something the average person realizes. So yes, you can be born with talent, but don’t let that for a minute make you think that being an artist isn’t all about the work. “Love what you do and you’ll never work a day in your life” IS A LIE!

What is the most important thing you have learned from your creative journey thus far?

I have learned that the world and all its creatures are so complex, it’s beyond all of our practical comprehension. I grew up thinking being right was more important (to me) than anything else. In Philadelphia, I thought hustling and being busy from sun up til sun down meant I was doing all the right things. I learned that everyone’s got baggage so stop judging. In Ecuador, I am learning that the world was not made just for me, so I need to adjust-adjust-adjust myself on a regular basis and not be afraid of how other people see me. Through my journies of becoming an Ecuadorian resident, my own personal difficulties of learning how to speak Spanish, and now at the beginning of my marriage, I have learned that trying to be right all the time and trying to come off like I know something about everything is exhausting, arrogant, and won’t work for me or the important people in my life anymore. I’m settling into a place where most things are new to me and there’s no way I could have prepared for them or knew about them. Personal evolution is my current mindspace and I have to leave all the doors and windows open.

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Exploring the Worlds of Humanity and Culture: Interview with M.K Komins

By Sarah Mills

For the past decade, artist and illustrator M.K Komins has been passionately committed to the pursuit of creative excellence. Based out of Philadelphia, she draws inspiration from the politically vibrant, collective consciousness of its artistic community. Her work uses a combination of hyper-stylized, dreamy realism and boldly saturated colors to explore the worlds of humanity and culture.

Former creative director for avenue u design in baltimore, maryland, she now works as creative coordinator for elysium marketing group. With a vast and diverse range of skills, her professional experience spans from music poster commissions to large-scale creative collaborations with companies like lord & taylor and the special olympics.

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Were you always interested in art?

Without question. As a kid, I used to sit dangerously close to our TV and try to draw cartoon characters as perfectly as I could before they left the screen. In first grade, I got in trouble for "tracing" a picture of Jafar from Aladdin and handing it in as an original drawing. When my art teacher refused to believe my cries of innocence I had my first creative epiphany. I realized if I could make adults think I was so good at drawing I must be lying about it, I could probably have a career as an artist. I also learned you can't always trust the judgment of adults, and sometimes knowing your truth is all you have when the grown-up world is against you-- both lessons that have guided me into my development as an artist and a woman.

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In your bio, you talk about the influence your creative community has on your work. Can you tell us more about that, specifically how they influence you?

Besides going to Parsons, moving back home to Philadelphia a year ago was the best decision I've ever made for my career. This city has the warmest, collaborative and artistically supportive community of working creatives I've ever experienced. It sounds trite, but "the City Of Brotherly Love" is a perfectly befitting nickname for Philly, and it's nowhere more evident than in our art scene. There are countless artist-run galleries and collectives here, tons of spaces dedicated to showcasing local work, our Mural Arts program is globally unprecedented and to put it simply, I'm in love with this town. When I was working and living in New York, I felt very small and was consumed by the constant anxiety to be winning at something and everything all the time. There's no room to be still finding yourself, or a work in progress even though everyone is all of those things all the time. The pressure to act like you're doing way better professionally and financially than you really are was highly oppressive. Maintaining an impossibly high social currency can be poison to your self-worth, which equated to a sort of creative death for me. I will always love and appreciate my time and education in New York because I cut my teeth on some deeply important creative rights of passages there. If you want to learn how to take a self-esteem beating, face rejection, be broke as hell and still have the desire to drag your ass to the studio the next day and keep making work, move to New York and become an artist.

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Besides your art community, where do you draw inspiration from?

Inspiration can be such a tricky thing to quantify for me, because I feel like the source of it is always evolving and I'm taking it in on a constant, often subconscious basis. Truthfully, I'm inspired the most by pop culture and my daily interactions with other people. Whether it's passionate political conversations with my family or waxing poetic about the philosophical merit of competition-based reality TV with my friends, my work is simply telling stories of humanity. I think the reason why I gravitate to portraiture and figurative work is that I genuinely admire human beings. We're so complicated and messy and difficult. We destroy what we love all of the time but we still have an innate sense of humanity that propels us forward to try and connect with other people and create art. I majored in illustration in school and what I learned the most is that being an Illustrator means you have to make art that is "subtly obvious". That concept carries over into my fine art as well and once I stopped obsessing over what kind of artist I was meant to be, I gave myself room to just make what made me happy. I've learned that inspiration really finds you when you give yourself room to grow as an artist. This past year I've come to just embrace my conflicting desires to be both bottom-scrapingly lowbrow and sophisticated high art.

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You have an extremely bold color palette, what drew you to such bold and saturated colors?

I'd love to have a profound answer to this question, but the truth is I just like them. I think when we are children, everyone draws and we aren't afraid to use the brightest colors in the crayon box and make bold, vibrant messes. Most people stop making things as they become adults and the ones that do often refine their tastes and palettes. To a large degree, I think I just never did that. I've never fully let go of my sense of whimsy or creative adventure and I'm not being hyperbolic when I say that the driving desire to make art has saved my life through some very low bottoms. The work I make as an adult and the process with which I make it isn't precious. I'm interested in beauty, but I don't have a much of a desire to make light, subtle things, so I think the subject matter and style sort of inform the harshness and vibrancy of my color palette. There's so much delicate, detailed, feminine work in the art world right now and while I absolutely see it's value, I just don't want to be another artist painting soft, pretty women.

What does your studio practice look like?

It's pretty exploratory. Lately, I've been developing a style of working that combines digital painting and traditional art mediums where I paint in programs like ProCreate or Photoshop, print on large scale canvas or giclee and then manipulate the printed pigments with destructive chemicals like acetone or bleach. The ink reacts sort of like watercolors and can be wiped away or redistributed on the image. Then I go back into it with oils, acrylics, colored pencils, and other mediums to add in detail. Fusing digital and analog methods of image making is a quest I am deeply passionate about right now and, I think, a pursuit whose time has come in the fine art world.

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What has been your favorite moment in your artistic career so far?

Hm, that's a toughy. There are a few projects in the works that I can't publicly announce yet that have got me pretty freaking excited, but I'm about to travel to London for 10 days in October to show my Florida, USA series during The Anti Art Fair with Creative Debuts. I have work in 2 shows in LA later this fall and winter as well so I think just being able to travel and bring my work to a wider audience has been super rewarding. I'm tremendously grateful to be in this position.

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What are some goals you are working towards in your career?

Too many to count. My original career goal was to be a concept artist for someone like Pixar and to illustrate children's books. The latter is something I'm actively working towards and the former is something I would love to do eventually. Personally, I don't know if I'll ever stop wanting to explore, grow, and get better as an artist. I hope I never get complacent in my quest for creative evolution. I love spending countless hours on a piece and feeling like I've done a good job, only to immediately see new work by another artist and think "Oh sh*t, that's way better!" That feeling used to crush and derail my process. But once I accepted that being an artist means staying constantly open to new ideas and self-improvement, I learned that I needed to frankly, get over myself by thinking I would ever be the best. I had a class at Parsons taught by this great illustrator Mike Perry who was tired of hearing a bunch of 20-year-old, privileged kids in an overpriced New York City art school complain about how unfair the art world is telling me something I'll never forget. He said that your career is just an escalator; there would always be someone behind you and there would always be someone in front of you. Stop trying to be the person in front of you. Just stay on the damn thing and you'll get where you want to go.

New Podcast: Instagram For Artists Part I

This month I celebrated new milestones on my Instagram accounts and wanted to share some simple, easy tips that helped me get my personal account to 20k and the magazine's account to 60k.

I use instagram to network, share my work with the world and even connect with new collectors! I want to share what has been working for me to help you do the same.

On this episode, I cover the basics on what to post, how to promote and even sell artwork. Perfect for beginners. 

-Kat