Posts tagged Art Gallery
Kle Mens at REJEKT Gallery
Kle Mens, St. Rita, 30x30x18 cm, polymer composite, edition of 15 casts, 2017.jpeg

REJEKT Gallery presents Hybrid Prophecy, a solo show of one of Poland's exceptional young artists, Kle Mens. Her work will be exhibited at 82a Commercial Street, a former public toilet in London’s East End and is curated by Elaine Tam. The show runs 14-23 June 2019, with an opening reception on Thursday 13th June 2019, at 6pm.

Kle Mens is a Warsaw-based visual artist working across painting, sculpture, performance and film. Following the death of her father, Kle Mens grew up in an extreme Catholic sect in Poland, under the care of her mother, a schizophrenic, devotee nun. As such, a major tenet of her work is the exploration and exploitation of religious iconography, which calls forth a brave new world of the feminine in post-secular art practice.

The paintings at the heart of her practice involve a traditional technique, one which requires the painstaking application of a hundred translucent layers. Through this steady dedication we witness the transfiguration of Kle Mens as a Saint, martyr and hybrid creature, which emphasizes the transmutable nature of timeless mythical bodies.

Having exhibited in her native country multiple times, the controversial nature of Kle Men’s work means that the artist has received notable backlash from a more conservative Polish audience, including the staging of protests outside her exhibitions.

In her first UK solo show, Kle Mens makes a brave incantation, summoning both religious martyrs and mythological hybrids to evoke the formidable force of female transformation, which underlies all her work. This exhibition sees Kle Mens revisiting the idolatry of female purity of her youth through the martyr’s series, with focus on those whose punishment was sex-related or sexuality-specific.

In a relational gesture of self-sacrifice, paint becomes embodied flesh in St. Agata, the venerated saint a prime example of the extraordinary sufferance endured by female devotees. A tense and disarming dedication, Kle Mens’ severing of her own breast is a profound moment of ekstasis propelling her into the temporality of long-standing religious order, a remark upon the continued urgency of feminist concerns. With similar spirit, she investigates the unusual, always-timeliness of the apocalypse — the recurring crisis of individual, collective and planetary future that haunts existence.

In Hybrid Prophecy, Kle Mens presents us with this provocation: a stunningly detailed film work, which animates and subverts Hans Memling's The Last Judgement. The centerpiece around which the themes of the exhibition revolve, The Last Judgement sees her assuming new bodies and fictions, while persisting with the religious iconography that she is passionately indebted to. As such, two mythological hybrids that feature in the Apocalypse of St. John become proto-Renaissance self-portraits.

Kle Mens adopts the mystical poise of the famously ambiguous, riddling Sphinx. Her traditional painting technique begets a certain magic — one of majestic strength, and silent yet photorealistic liveness — which also courses through Harpy. While the eagle is emblematic of the Polish state, in the Apocalypse it behaves as a premonition, heralding a collapse between sky and earth. With this, Kle Mens continues her elegant foray into mythic territories, their power and their promise.

Kle Mens (Klementyna Stepniewska, b. 1985) graduated from the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts in 2014 under the direction of Jarosław Modzelewski and Igor Przybylski. In 2016, she was winner of the The Geppert Competition XII, the most prestigious prize for young painters in Poland. To date, she has had three solo exhibitions, the most recent of which is Hail Mary (2019). Her works St. Rita and Kummernis are held by a key public collection, National Museum of Gdansk.

REJEKT Gallery are representatives of future pioneers of contemporary art from Eastern Europe. They curate unprecedented, unconventional events for new East artists in London. REJEKT seeks to represent and garner respect of Eastern European artists. Founder and Director, Sarah Sosnierz started promoting electronic music through hosting parties, aiming to collaborate various artists between London and Warsaw in the hope that this exchange would open new channels of cultural communication between East and Western Europe.

REJEKT do not conform to a traditional gallery setup. Their selection of unadulterated art is exhibited in unusual spaces, from industrial units to disused public toilets. Based in London, REJEKT has transitioned from illustrious clubs in Praga, flirting with underground dance club culture, to an arts platform occupying unique Heterotopian spaces; providing unconventional conduits; simultaneously mental and physical, geographical and digital representation.

For more information please contact: Anna Beketov, Damson Communications at anna.beketov@damsonpr.com or +44 (0)20 7812 0645.

The Stranger, Solo Exhibition by Alex Merritt at Booth Gallery
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Booth Gallery is proud to present The Stranger, a debut solo exhibition by Alex Merritt, on view May 17 - June 12, 2019, at 325 W. 38th St in New York. Popularly known for his large-scale oils and brutal approach to painting, Alex Merritt will be exhibiting 20 new paintings and drawings in large and small formats.

Merritt’s works include a recurring motif visualized through expansive landscapes juxtaposed by isolated figures which directly confront the viewer. In works like “Hermetic Bliss” (detail above), the subject is visceral and haunting yet vulnerably human. A distinct narrative is intentionally concealed and left for the viewer’s interpretation, much like the artist’s process: it is hidden amongst the layers.

Through a constant working and reworking, the paint is scraped down and built up to range from a thick paste to liquid. The sheer physicality of the canvases showing layers of paint 3-4 inches in depth reveals they are as much of an object sculpturally as they are a 2-dimensional image. Subject and object become one, and the finished works represent a direct result of these layers, weaving in and out of one another, often obfuscating the literal.

Merritt’s influences include the likes of Chaim Soutine, Joan Eardley, Antonio Mancini, and Frank Auerbach; Inspired by their bravado to compose large-scale works and to experimentation with surface quality.

Alex Merritt was born in 1981 in Washington, DC. In 2015, he received his B.F.A. in painting from the Mary- land Institute College of Art and in 2018 completed his MFA from The New York Academy of Art. The artist joined Booth Gallery in June 2018; this will be his first Solo show to date. Works from are in numerous private collections worldwide and currently has had a collection of works acquired by liana Gore Museum in Tel Aviv, Israel.

On Friday, May 17, 2019, an opening reception will be held from 6-9pm and is open to the public.

Art New York Highlight Exhibitor: Cavalier Gallery
Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)   Black Panther , 2017  Bullet Shells 36 x 72 x 12 in. (91.4 x 182.9 x 30.5 cm)

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)
Black Panther, 2017
Bullet Shells
36 x 72 x 12 in. (91.4 x 182.9 x 30.5 cm)

Art New York 2019 at Pier 94

Thu, May 2 - Sun, May 5 

www.artnyfair.com

The highly-anticipated fifth edition of Art New York returns to Pier 94 from May 2-5 during the height of New York’s art and cultural season. 

The Fair showcases noteworthy works by important artists from the contemporary, modern, post-war and pop eras presented by more than 70 international galleries. Art New York provides a fresh alternative for acquiring important, never-before-exhibited works from both primary and secondary markets, including CONTEXT, a platform for a selection of new and established contemporary galleries showcasing emerging, mid-career and cutting-edge talent. The fair annually welcomes both experienced and new art collectors who are looking to experience a carefully-curated, rich-in-content presentation of the best in the global contemporary art market. 

Art New York, at Pier 94, will begin with an elegant, invitation-only VIP Preview event on Thursday, May 2 from 2:00 to 5:00PM. The special preview offers collectors, art advisors, curators, and media the opportunity to examine and acquire the finest works available in the market before the fair opens to the public that evening and continues through Sunday, May 5. 

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)   I Love You , 2019  Bullet Shells 72 x 36 x 48 in. (182.9 x 91.4 x 121.9 cm)  ACPB0539


Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)

I Love You, 2019
Bullet Shells
72 x 36 x 48 in. (182.9 x 91.4 x 121.9 cm)
ACPB0539

Interview with Olivia Pek Gallery Associate, Cavalier Gallery

www.cavaliergalleries.com

Tell us about your gallery and the type of art you exhibit.

Adelson Galleries (New York and Boston) and Cavalier Galleries (New York, Nantucket, Greenwich) have partnered together in opening Adelson Cavalier Galleries on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Florida. With a combined 85 years of experience in the art business, each gallery brings their expertise in the fields of Impressionism, Realism, Modernism, and Contemporary Art. Adelson Cavalier Galleries exhibits emerging and established Contemporary artists, as well as historically significant artworks by 19th and 20th Century masters. Adelson Cavalier Galleries is open year-round with rotating exhibits.  

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)   Baby Panda (Patient) , 2019  Bullet Shells 15 x 11 x 9 in. (38.1 x 27.9 x 22.9 cm)  ACPB0361

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)
Baby Panda (Patient), 2019
Bullet Shells
15 x 11 x 9 in. (38.1 x 27.9 x 22.9 cm)
ACPB0361

Name a few artists that you are bringing to this year's Art New York Fair. 

Here are a few of the artists whose work we are exhibiting:

-Jim Rennert 

-William Nelson

-Guy Stanley Philoche

-Wolf Kahn

-Hans Hofmann

-Federico Uribe

-Magdalena Murua

What are you most excited about in terms of your booth selection this year?

We are excited to bring a fantastic selection of artists to Art New York this year. The centerpiece of our booth is the astonishing mixed media piece,  I Love You, by Colombian artist Federico Uribe. Just a few blocks away, at our gallery on 57th Street, our 3,800 square foot ground floor space is currently dedicated to the outstanding work of Federico Uribe, with his solo exhibition “Mesmerized,” on view through June 1st.  

Please share a few tips for fair visitors or new collectors.

Bring your checkbook!

Solo Show of Harlem artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London | April 1-13, 2019
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FACTION Art Projects is delighted to present a solo show of Harlem-based artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London. Following an exhibition of Squirewell’s work at FACTION’s Harlem space, the FACTION team is bringing him to London for a display of multilayered collages, which through elements of mythology, sacred geometry and science, tackle themes of race and memory. This marks Squirewell’s first solo show outside the US. A Private View of the exhibition will be held on April 2, 2019 from 6-9pm.

Squirewell’s newest works, which have evolved over two or three years of archival study and exploration, are heavily influenced by a recent revelation of his paternal ancestry.

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Squirewell says:

‘For most of my life I believed my family were African Americans who had arrived to the US on slave ships, and it wasn’t until my twenties that I discovered my true heritage, that they were indigenous Americans. As a teacher working closely with the national curriculum I constantly see how history, even now, is curated. My art attempts to rewrite these assumed histories. The beauty of the works capture the viewer, but it’s the ugly that intrigues and leads them to look deeper.’

Rediscovering his ancestry has prompted Squirewell to question his identity, particularly in the western hemisphere. It also speaks to his battle with the omnipresent slavery narrative, when he himself comes from a black family that is not believed to have a history of slavery. Through portraiture he challenges histories and presents a more empowering narrative for black identity, seeking to change the terminology around the very word ‘black’.

The portraits have a16th, 17th and 18th century aesthetic with a contemporary awareness. The depicted figures are both real historical figures and fictitious characters that are in some way related to the artist. Through demonstrating the misrepresentations of history, they critique what we colloquially describe as fact. Each artwork is complete only after he ceremoniously burns both the collage and its hand carved frames which include motifs and markings from ancient indigenous American and African cultures.

The titles of Stan Squirewell’s works reference particular moments in our shared history. One work entitled ‘Willendorf’, is inspired by the prehistoric female figure of ‘Venus of Willendorf’, while another, ‘Amerindian’ refers to the ‘$5 Indians’ - those who, 125 years ago, paid for falsified documents that proved them to be Native American.

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About Stan Squirewell:

Stan Squirewell was born and raised in Washington, DC and currently lives and works in Harlem, New York. His artistic training began at the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. Since graduating he has continued his tutelage under many of DC’s legends including artists Michael Platt and Lou Stovall. Squirewell, is a painter, photographer, installation and performance artist. His work is multilayered and his subject matter tackles themes such as: race and memory through mythology, sacred geometry and science. He draws his inspiration from theory books, science fiction movies and novels, avant-garde jazz and indigenous storytelling. He is a (2007 MFA) graduate of the Hoffberger School of Painting where he studied with the late, Grace Hartigan. Squirewell is the first winner of the Rush Philanthropic and Bombay Sapphire Artisan series. He has performed with Nick Cave (SoundSuits) at the National Portrait Gallery and Jefferson Pinder with G-Fine Arts. He is privately and publicly collected, his works are in the Reginald Lewis Museum, the Robert Steele Collection and recently acquired by the Smithsonian for the African American Museum (2015.) Squirewell is currently exhibited as part of ‘Fashioning the body’ at projects+gallery in St. Louis alongside Bisa Butler, Soly Cissé, Renee Cox, David Antonio Cruz, Kenturah Davis, Hassan Hajjaj, Basil Kincaid, Mario Moore, Chris Ofili, Fahamu Pecou, Katherine Simóne Reynolds, Jacolby Satterwhite, Mickalene Thomas, and Kehinde Wiley.

About FACTION Art Projects:

FACTION is a flexible collective, from the team behind the hugely successful Gallery 8 and Coates & Scarry in London, who have created a unique model for artists and gallerists to work together. FACTION addresses the changing market place and the erosion of the traditional art market, where galleries were gatekeepers for artists. FACTION provides artists with promotion and opportunity to access collectors and a wider audience, with all the support of a gallery but without the constraints of the traditional model. They aim to deliver a program of artists that is diverse and inclusive. FACTION launched in February 2018 at Gallery 8 in Harlem, New York and since then has become strongly imbedded in the Striver’s Row community and a highlight of Harlem’s cultural scene.

For more information please contact Anna Beketov, anna.beketov@damsonpr.com, +44 (0)20 7812 0645

PxP Contemporary: Sell Your Work Through a New Gallery and Online Platform

Listen to the new podcast Q&A with Kat and Alicia answering common questions about the new project. We talk about why we started the gallery, what we are looking for, how to submit work, best practices and more!

Sell Your Work Through a New Gallery and Online Platform

PxP Contemporary is pleased to announce an open call for emerging artists looking to sell work via a new online gallery and curatorial platform, launching in 2019. 

Working with Create! Magazine over the years has introduced co-founders Alicia Puig and Ekaterina Popova to incredible artists and collectors alike, and we are thrilled to be connecting the two through PxP Contemporary. Our gallery will feature rotating exhibitions along with themed collections and we are planning additional curated projects as well as art fairs for the future. Initially, we will be seeking to represent a small group of approximately ten artists. These artists’ works will be promoted during the launch of our first group show and then regularly via our website, email newsletters, solo or group exhibitions, and social media channels.

Information and eligibility 

  • Artists 18+ working in any medium are welcome to submit work that is currently available for sale and is priced between $100-$2000 retail value. 

  • A fine art degree is not required to participate in our open call. 

  • Please only enter artworks that are not reserved by any other gallery or booked for exhibitions within a six month period. If work is selected by our curatorial team, artists will be contacted for additional information, images and also be asked to sign a contract. 

  • Gallery artists should prepare quality photographs of each work that will be featured on our website, including images of the sides and details, in order for potential buyers to have a complete visual representation of your piece. 

  • On any works sold via our platform, the gallery will charge a 30% commission and the artist will receive 70%. 

  • The buyer of the artwork will cover shipping costs based on a calculated formula of weight and the intended destination. 

  • Artists will then be responsible for properly packing the sold work according to our specific instructions and industry standards as well as taking it to a postal location. 

  • Artwork will be sold as is with no refunds (hence the emphasis on accurate, high-resolution images of your work) and artists will be paid promptly upon the buyer receiving the piece. 

  • All art will be insured when shipping to protect both parties. 

  • Works will be offered unframed unless it is a part of the piece or is requested by the buyer. In this case, we will coordinate the extra costs with the client. 

PLEASE PREPARE THE FOLLOWING FOR YOUR APPLICATION:

  • Artist Statement and Artist Biography 

  • Artist Resume

  • Up to ten (10) images of completed past artworks

  • Please submit only jpg files

  • Images should be no more than 5MB in file size

  • File Name: Images should be titled in the following manner: Last Name, First Name, a number corresponding to the image description sheet (For example: DoeJane01; DoeJane02; etc.)

  • Annotated Image List: Title of work, Dimensions, Medium, Year of Completion, Price

  • A non-refundable submission fee of $10 for up to ten images is required

 

We will continue to review applications on a rolling basis, but the deadline for the initial round of represented artists and the first group exhibition will be May 1, 2019.

 Thank you and we look forward to reviewing your work. Email questions to: alicia@createmagazine.com

Website coming soon: www.pxpcontemporary.com

California Artists: Brea Art Gallery Call for Entries

This annual juried exhibit showcases artwork from all over the state of California. MICA strives to highlight artists in all stages of their careers and offers them a chance to compete for a number of awards, including the coveted solo show opportunity. This regional show features artwork from an extensive variety of mediums and explores creative movements happening in California. 

Entry Deadline: February 28, 2019

Max Cole 'Crosswinds" at Larry Becker Contemporary Art
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If you find yourself in Philadelphia before the end of the year, we highly suggest stopping by Larry Becker Contemporary Art to see their current exhibition. To be honest, it wasn’t yet on my radar when I decided to go gallery hopping on a Saturday in November. I happened to begin chatting with an artist sitting a co-op space nearby and he urged me to go over and take a look. ‘Crosswinds’ presents paintings and works on paper by American artist Max Cole. I won’t give away too much here since the owners are more than happy to tell you about this incredible artist and her work - so go see some great art and say hi to their adorable gallery cat!

Max Cole
’Crosswinds’
On view Nov 10 - Dec 29, 2018

You can follow the gallery on Facebook & Instagram.

Max Cole’s paintings suggest an approach to infinity through the use of vertical repetitive lines, a record of intense focus that is said to contain energy as embedded content. The artist describes this process, which she has worked in for over 50 years, as meditative. Though sometimes compared to the work of Agnes Martin, the similarities between the practices are superficial. “There is no other way to produce the work except for a depth of engagement requiring the abandonment of self," Cole has explained, "and this process opens the door to infinity enabling reach outside the physical. For me art must transcend the material.” Born in 1937 in Hodgeman County, KS, she received her BFA from Fort Hays State University in Kansas and her MFA from the University of Arizona in Tucson. Influenced by the Suprematist works of Kazimir Malevich during the late 1950s, she began producing paintings which reflected on time with simple forms. The artist lives and works in California. Today, Cole’s works are held the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, among others.

Artist biography adapted from Artnet.

"Body Rock" Exhibition at Central Tattoo Studio

Central Tattoo Studio and Create! Magazine are pleased to present the opening of a group exhibition titled "Body Rock".

The show includes the work of five artists inspired by tattoo culture. This exhibition includes work by artists that interpret the theme by using their unique style, subject and creative approach. 

Opening: September 22, 6pm

Where: 

Central Tattoo Studio

171 W Girard Avenue

Philadelphia, PA 19123

Exhibition dates: September 1 - October 28, 2018 

About Central Tattoo Studio

Central Tattoo Studio is a fine art forward, custom tattoo studio in Philadelphia, PA. Our first floor gallery space features rotating exhibitions from local and emerging artists whose work bridges the gap between fine art and tattoo work. Our second floor tattoo studio hosts tattoo artists with a strong understanding of the foundations of fine art; color, form, line, space and composition. Our tattoo artists specialize in watercolor tattoos, abstract/graphic tattoos, geometric tattoos and black and grey realism tattoos.

Participating Artists

Tracy Kerdman

I was born in Huntington, West Virginia. A city now known as the heart of the opioid epidemic. At the age of five I moved to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. I studied painting at the College of Charleston where I earned a BA in Studio Art. In 2010, I moved to New York to continue my study of painting at the National Academy Museum and School and MoMA, where I would take extensive lecture classes. My paintings have been exhibited in Germany, Canada, New York and throughout the United States, from the Korean Cultural Center in Los Angeles, to the Museum of Fine Arts in Tallahassee, Florida. I live and paint in Hell’s Kitchen in NYC with my husband.

My work largely draws from the cultural inconsistencies of my background of growingup on the Grand Strand of South Carolina, a place recognizable for its hospitality, and paradoxically, its bigotry. Figurative painting is what drives my interest and helps me to explore contradiction and anxiety buried in normalcy. The work aims to be familiar and within the realm of conventional, figurative oil paintings only at first glance. Working within the context of traditional representational work and portraiture, the goal is to create something unsettling and more disconcerting than an academic, technical representation.

www.tkerdman.com

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Brandi Merolla

Born: NYC

BFA: Photography & Drawing, Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University.

Art Director Tower Records 4th St./Broadway, NYC 1983-1986.

Merolla Displays; Custom 3D foam-core displays for record companies, FAO Schwarz, Howard Stern Show. 1986-2018.

The ritual art of tattooing has been practiced since ancient times. Then in 1876 Thomas Edison invented the "Electric Pen" in the age where electricity began to make it's way into our culture. Famed tattoo artist Samuel O'Reilly then used this new modern invention to tattoo in NYC. 

At that time, mostly sailors got tattooed. They had their bodies marked with patriotic, nautical and religious symbols. For the next few decades tattoo designs expanded to include memorial, sports and romantic symbology to a broader audience.

In my new body of artwork, I take tattoo flash from the years 1900-1940 and I blow them up from 2" high drawings to 3'-4' high 3D foam-core sculptures. I stay true to these primitive line drawings and make them larger than life just as they are remembered historically. My reverence for these original designs explains the scale shift. 

https://www.scenesfromtheattic.com/tat-art

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Brandon Straus

My paintings are a visual dialogue about the contemporary and historical relationships between art and commodity fetishism. With respect to traditional subject matter such as still life, interiors, and portraiture, my paintings explore the material world and question their current cultural implications and narrative potential. Modernism, fauvism, and orientalism mingle in my compositions in flattened rendering, brush stroke and color, and still life objects. 

My source images come from online shopping, design magazines, social media, and personal objects. In their combination they create a visual archeology of personal identity. My compositions use vocabulary that addresses themes of queerness, Judaism, and historical modern painting with humorously self-aware nonchalance.

https://www.instagram.com/brandon_straus/

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Mishal Weston

Mishal Weston (1988) is a Zimbabwean born designer and artist based in Cape Town, South Africa.

As I walk through the streets or meander down the beach, my eyes wander from side to side looking for little treasures to collect. Things that are beautiful in my eyes, but that some may find strange. Through a shifting lens, I capture objects from a different perspective, looking closer than most seeing more than the naked eye would care to take in.

But then I look up and see the marked collections of stories adorned on flesh. Stories that within their marks tell a story, each line, dot and shadow overlaying a crease, a blood vessel, a mole or even a story past and now covered. Now collecting the collectors.

https://www.instagram.com/mishalweston/

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Julianne Merino

Julianne Merino (1991, Hickory, North Carolina, United States) is a New Orleans based visual artist. Combining sewing, collage and painting, Julianne juxtaposes the process of painting, that has a predominantly masculine history in western art, with sewing –considered women’s labor. She graduated from Pioneer Valley Performing Arts with a concentration in costume design in 2010 and with a BFA from Massachusetts College of Art + Design in 2014. Julianne has worked as a printmaking instructor and as a journalist of art in New Orleans. 

I take dolls very seriously. I started making paper dolls from magazine cut-outs and scraps of fabric as a child. Using these materials as an adult, my work reimagines the definition of what a doll is. As marionettes, paintings, or collages, these female figures sit waiting for something to happen to them.The passive female figure is an enduring theme from old master paintings to fashion magazines to vintage pin-ups. 

I work on translucent vellum, painting, collaging & sewing from front and back to create layers with a distorted sense of depth, reminiscent of skewed perspective from the medieval period. A visual hierarchy emerges that subverts traditional power structures. Rather than a scene the viewer might step into, these landscapes feel more like a reverie, replete with all the non-linearity of a sleepy-eyed subconscious. 

Through collage, I juxtapose classical symbols and quotidian commercial imagery, challenging culturally inherited assumptions about femininity. The disharmony between these two extremes allows me to critically explore and decode their meanings & create a cipher of personal iconography. 

Sewing & embroidery, which I first learned from my mother, has historically been women's work passed down through generations. I have expanded my craft amid costuming culture in New Orleans, specifically learning from the work of a Mardi Gras Indian chief, and now employ these materials as a visually stark departure from my collage and painting, an art form dominated by men throughout western art. I engage these mediums to complicate gender dynamics of not only theme, but process. 

I will further develop my process, including threading into paper, printing onto fabrics, and deepening the relationship between textile and mixed media works. I want to focus on making interactive pieces, like marionettes, and sculptural work. I’d like to incorporate family heirlooms, sewing and putting them into new works, creating a sense of femininity through generations. I want to juxtapose this familiarity and intimacy with the dark, satirical, & extraordinary imagery of Mardi Gras culture. 

I’d like to create tapestries and/or wearable art that combines embroidery and 2d imagery, reminiscent of secret fraternal banners, but through the classic iconography of women throughout different history/ religions. What if women had their own secret orders? What would their traditions and symbols be? I’m drawn to this double standard because secret fraternal orders were considered to be wise and ritualistic, whereas women were considered to be heretics and witches. These were the archetypes that capitalism had to destroy. 

Using embroidery looms, silk-screening and beading, I’d like to create 3d fabric pieces, reminiscent of medieval hell mouths and the faces on old Mardi Gras floats. Creating pieces that viewers can interact with is important to me, whether through puppetry, wearing, or unveiling something hidden under a piece of cloth.

This residency is an opportunity for growth — not just spatially or methodically, but also a growth in the sense of community. I feel excited thinking about this residency as a chance to be surrounded by like-minded and supportive people. 

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Heaven of Many a Tangled Hue at Spoke Art

Heaven of Many a Tangled Hue

a solo show by Chuck Sperry

April 7 - 28, 2018

Spoke SF is pleased to present Heaven of Many a Tangled Hue, a solo exhibition by the prolific San Francisco-based artist and master screen printer Chuck Sperry. For his third solo exhibition with Spoke Art, Sperry has created a verdant garden of new work tended by his signature shimmering muses.

Informed by art historical figures such as Gustave Moreau and William Morris, combined with the poetry of P.B. Shelley, Greek Mythology and his home in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco, Chuck Sperry has cultivated a distinct style brimming with exuberance and energy. Combined with his masterful printing expertise, Sperry creates ethereal and psychedelically saturated screen prints that draw crowds and dedicated fans around the world.

Creating work for musicians such as The Who, Patti Smith and The Black Keys in addition to his fine art screen prints on panel, Chuck Sperry has also used his artwork for social activism and change. The artist describes his political participation - “Freedom of Speech is our most powerful weapon, and it’s a driving force in my art.”

Please join us for Heaven of Many a Tangled Hue, opening Saturday, April 7th, with an opening night reception from 4pm - 9pm where the artist will be present. All sales will be conducted on a first-come, first-served basis with limits per customer. The exhibition will be on view through Saturday, April 28th. For more information or additional images, please email us at SF@spoke-art.com.

Recent Gallery Exhibitions in Amsterdam

This past weekend, several galleries in Amsterdam opened their doors on Saturday evening to celebrate the opening or closing of new and recent exhibitions. My first stop was to visit Ornis A. Gallery’s presentation of paintings by Bart Kok. His solo exhibition The Ideology of Pipe Smoking features works in intense, saturated tones that are often figural, but with a touch of humor and surrealism.

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Walking along the same street, the photographs in the window of Galerie Wouter van Leeuwen immediately caught my attention so I went in to inquire about the artist. Inside, not only did I find a beautiful show of Steve Fitch’s images capturing nostalgic and quintessentially ‘American’ landscapes, but also an impeccably curated collection of photographs from artists the gallery represents - including pieces from Michael Wolf’s Tokyo Compression series.

Steve Fitch:

Michael Wolf:

Also nearby is Stigter van Doesburg, which is currently featuring a solo show by Amie Dicke. According to the gallery press release: “The Liver Must Go To The Images brings together new works, which deploy printed matter as a sculptural material. Pictures pulled from various sources – including newspaper clippings, fashion magazines and art monographs – are broken down and built up into new image-objects wherein the partial obliteration of pictorial content becomes another mode of inscription.” Of particular interest were two smaller works tucked away in the back corner entitled My split self and My split self II, 2016.

Prelude: Forever Someone Else at GRIMM gallery’s Keizersgracht location (they also have a second outpost in Amsterdam and another space in New York) features a selection of works by Desiree Dolron. Their press release explains:

“The exhibition is a prelude to a larger body of work that will be the subject of a new monograph, scheduled for publication in 2020.

The title ‘Forever Someone Else’ refers to a book of selected poems by Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935), a writer, philosopher, mystic and astrologer. Pessoa employed as many as 75 alter egos, referred to as heteronyms, which he deployed at will to disseminate various philosophical and theoretical views.

This exhibition reveals a body of work from Dolron never previously exhibited. Included are various self-portraits in such distinct environments that each becomes an alter ego of the artist, functioning much like Pessoa’s heteronyms. The viewer witnesses the artist adapting, changing and evolving with each situation.”

Highlights in the exhibition included a striking self-portrait of the artist as well as a triptych of photographs.

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“Starting with works from 1991, the exhibition presents photographs taken in Pakistan and India, depicting Romani, the world’s oldest roaming nomad tribe. The earliest self-portrait in the exhibition features Dolron when she returned to the site in 1997, standing with an AK-47 amidst Taliban child soldiers.”

“Three individual images are shown on another wall; a speeding car, symbolizing the American dream, taken in Cuba (2002), a portrait of a beautiful girl from the Dominican Republic gazing melancholically into the camera (2001) [image], and a desert landscape shot at night in California (1990); the blacks intense, the light subdued. Together, these three images promote ideas of power and status.”

All images courtesy of the artists and their respective galleries. 

The Do’s and Don’ts of Applying to Galleries

One of the quintessential markers of an artist’s success is securing a gallery to represent their work. The application process can be daunting, whether you have already sent out hundreds of emails or are mustering up the courage to reach out to your first gallery. While it does take time and a little bit of research, it doesn’t have to be so overwhelming. Based on insider knowledge from working for galleries, art fairs, museums and auction houses and my own previous experiences approaching this as an artist, I’ve put together my thoughts on what to have prepared before you submit, how to find the right fit for your work and the best do’s and don’ts for applying to galleries.

First, if you haven’t read Kat’s post “5 Things Keeping Your Art from Being Featured”, please pause right here and check it out first! A lot of the rules she mentions relate to this topic as well.

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1. Adding to her tips about your artist website – DO choose a simple, memorable domain name and email address. You’d be surprised at how many people send applications with websites or personal emails that are not related to their art! You want your first impression to make you look like a professional, practicing studio artist.

A few good options are [yourname].com, [yourname]art.com or [yourname]artist.com. If you have a more common name you can play around with adding your middle name, initial, or using a shortened version of your first name like Kat did! https://www.katerinapopova.com/

2. DON’T jump the gun and submit before you’re ready. Have a consistent body of work that includes at least 15-20 pieces viewable on your site. They don’t all have to be one medium, but should demonstrate that you’ve put effort into developing an idea. This allows a prospective gallery to imagine what a full solo show of yours would look like. If you only send five images or don’t have many posted on your website, a dealer might think that you don’t have enough work to fill a gallery.

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3. DO compare galleries. In the best-case scenario, you would visit galleries and talk to the owner, director or manager in person beforehand to get a feel for whom you would be working with. Just like if you’re job searching, you want the relationship with your gallery to be mutually beneficial. If you don’t like the space or didn’t connect with the staff, you’ll be glad you didn’t spend the effort applying.

4. DO your research if you can’t go to the galleries to find the best match. Find out who they already represent. Visualize a group show with all of these artists and honestly answer the question: Does my work fit the aesthetic? Read their résumés to see where they studied and have exhibited (and how they are formatted!). Do you have similar accomplishments?

If you're a younger artist, try looking for galleries with a smaller project space where they are often more willing to show emerging or experimental work. This could be an easier way to get your foot in the door.

Finally, if you are applying to galleries outside of your local area, always consider how much you are able to spend to ship your work to them. That is usually a cost that you will have to incur and it can get expensive very quickly, even if some dealers are willing to split the shipping fees 50/50.

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5. DO look closely at a gallery’s website and social media channels. A quality gallery will maintain their online presence using the same standards that they expect of yours: modern, clean and up-to-date. You might also want to note if a gallery regularly produces a catalog for their artists’ exhibitions, if they are private versus open to the public and which art fairs they attend, if any. If these things are important to you, don’t lose time drafting applications to galleries that don’t meet your requirements.

6. Along a similar vein, DON’T submit an unsolicited application if a gallery’s website explicitly says that they are not currently looking for artists. I worked at a gallery where we noted that we were not actively seeking applications and we were still contacted by multiple artists each week! Please read their website thoroughly to avoid making this mistake.

Think about it from another perspective – if you were an artist already represented by this gallery and they continued to take on more people, you would likely have less opportunity to show and they would focus less effort on selling your work specifically. Though I would personally avoid applying to galleries that aren’t looking altogether, if it otherwise seems like the perfect fit for your work, my best advice is to see if you can get a face-to-face meeting with the director.

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7. Please DON’T just show up to a gallery with your portfolio. Again, I’ve worked at galleries where this happened weekly and it is not the right way to start the conversation. If you arrive unannounced, you are catching the staff off guard and there is no guarantee that someone will be available to meet with you. Similarly, exhibition openings and the first few days of an art fair are tough times for long conversations with a dealer because they will be focused on their clients and closing sales. However, if you notice a lull when you are there, certainly take the chance to meet them or ask them for an appointment at a more convenient time. This way, when you follow up via email you can say that you’ve already met – mention when and where so they remember.

8. DO find other opportunities to introduce yourself. Besides showing up to gallery openings, attend art events in your community and you are likely to meet the people you are looking to work with organically. Practice speaking to people about your work confidently, like an elevator pitch, and ideally be able to do one that is short (one minute) and one that is a little longer (five minutes) in case you have the time for a more in-depth conversation. Pinpoint what are the most exciting or unique things about your work and you as an artist and use those to convince a gallerist to want to represent you.

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9. DO read their application instructions carefully, triple check your materials, and have a friend look for typos! If they do not list specific instructions, send a brief email stating your interest in the gallery and attach your resume, images as a zip file and your artist statement (check out our article with tips on writing one). For large files, you can also use programs like Dropbox and WeTransfer, but be wary of having to send more than one email. Ideally, you want to send a complete application in one message. Look on the gallery information page of their website to find the name and email of the owner or director so you can address it directly to him or her.

Your message could read something like this:

Dear [Gallery Owner],

I am writing in reference to the call for artists listed on your website [OR to submit my work to be considered for representation]. My current body of work [describe in one or two sentences]. I have exhibited most recently at [name notable exhibitions, preferably solo or two-person] and am part of the permanent collection of [list any]. [Also mention relevant awards, recent press, residencies or other gallery affiliations].  

Please find attached my artist statement and résumé, as well as a selection of my work. Additional pieces can be viewed on my website: [list website here]. If you have any further questions, feel free to contact me at [list email, phone or both]. Thank you for your time and I look forward to hearing from you shortly.

This example is more formal, but it gives you an idea of what you can say to keep it simple and direct. 

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10. DON’T get frustrated if your application goes unanswered. Hopefully, a gallery will at least do you the courtesy of acknowledging your application, but they often do not. My general rule is that once I apply to something I “forget” about it rather than worry or obsessively check my email. If I hear back, hooray! – if not, oh well. There will always be more to apply to. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t follow up. It is appropriate to send a message about a week or two after the initial one to ask if your application was received or if it is being reviewed. If they still don’t respond, however, then it’s time to move on.

11. DO consider alternative models like co-op galleries. Depending on where you are in your career, it might be worth it for you to exchange a few sitting hours per month for the opportunity to show. Always read their agreements carefully to decide if the exhibition potential outweighs the membership fees and/or working requirements.

Speaking of alternatives to the traditional gallery – connecting with independent curators, art advisors and interior designers can help broaden your client base as well. While most galleries sell to private individuals or people purchasing on behalf of an institution, a curator or designer might be looking for art to place in a corporate office, hotel lobby, restaurant or department store, and some are tasked with finding artists for large-scale mural projects. But most importantly, never underestimate the power of building your own personal brand! With a strong website and social media presence, you can start to make sales on your own.

12. Lastly, DON’T let the fear of rejection hold you back. When I was still in art school, I remember finding a gallery focused on emerging artists. I compared myself to who they were already showing and thought that I fit the bill, but I was too scared and talked myself out of submitting an application for a whole YEAR! Luckily, once I finally bit the bullet and applied, I heard back shortly after and was asked to bring in a few pieces for a final review. At my meeting, the gallery director decided to take all of them and I signed a contract on the spot. Sadly, the gallery eventually closed, but at the time despite being overjoyed at the positive outcome, I was a little disappointed in myself for having given into my self-doubt for so long. Don’t let that be you.

Everyone at Create! is cheering for you! So, go, apply to amazing galleries and get represented. Tell us about it when you do ;) 

Laurence Jones: "Night Works" at Rebecca Hossack Gallery

"Night Works will be a body of approximately 15 paintings around the idea of constructed narratives, exploring the subtle links that connect the painted scenes. I wish to maintain a fine balance between specific references to a place, and more open-ended ideas that might come about during the painting process. The works in the show will explore the influence of technology and the invisible forces and structures that shape us as humans. I would like to make a body of clean, smooth, immersive paintings that illuminate different vantage points and means of experiencing reality, whilst retaining a tactility that only paint can offer. I intend for the worlds created to feel real; familiar and immersive, but balanced with the idea that the normal rules don’t apply – the way shadows fall, the solid appearance of surfaces being called into question, the feeling that at any given moment a wall could fade into nothingness or a horizon could collapse in on itself; subtle clues which question the notion of the real. Equally, I hope the works present open-ended narratives, which are completed by the viewer. The settings will be similar to my previous works: pools, tennis courts, and architectural interiors. I feel the inherent ambiguity of these types of spaces will serve the themes I hope to explore. The title ‘Night Works’ refers to the idea of an ambiguous setting, which runs throughout the work as a recurring motif. It also connotes physical process and ideas pertaining to the construction of spaces."

About Laurence Jones

Touted as an artist to watch by Saatchi, Jones has spent the last two years exhibiting at prestigious international fairs like Seattle Art Fair, Art Toronto and Miami Project, before focusing on this new body of the work. He is fascinated by processes of figuration, and how painterly devices can be used to construct a narrative. 

His paintings focus on hyper-modern dwelling spaces, which he likes to think of as settings taut with a sense of imminent drama. The screen-like finish of each work, achieved through dextrously worked layers of oil and glazes, creates a strongly immersive experience for the viewer. And yet, just as we are drawn in, the sense of staged imagery - a strange feeling of déja vu fed by our over-exposure to modern media - places his paintings in an ambiguous state between fiction and reality. The works investigate the nature of the gaze as well as fabricated spaces.

The show will run from 4 - 28th May

REBECCA HOSSACK ART GALLERY

2A Conway Street

Fitzroy Square

London W1T 6BA

United Kingdom

www.rebeccahossack.com