Posts tagged Artist
Solo Exhibition by Artist Danielle Krysa at Mayberry Fine Art
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By Ekaterina Popova

Artist Danielle Krysa has been busy in the studio this year, and it shows. I have always been a fan of her collage work, but most recently she took her studio practice on a whole other level and released a solo exhibition filled with large scale paintings and mixed media pieces that will inspire you, take your breath away and even make you laugh.

Danielle's work is on view at Mayberry Fine Art from June 1 - June 28, 2019. To purchase or inquire about available work visit www.mayberryfineart.com or email toronto@mayberryfineart.com

Danielle's Statement:

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There are, and always have been, a ridiculous number of stories in my head - stories I tell myself, stories I share out loud, and stories that become my mixed media collages. My most recent work takes those narratives a little further, inviting the viewer into my mind. There are messes and moments of pure joy that exist in an ‘artist’s chaotic and abstract world. There are also quiet white spaces – completely void of ideas – but then somehow, someway the creative machine starts churning again. A juicy stroke of paint in the perfect hue, or just the right found image and, voila, joy is restored! These artworks are a glimpse into the never-ending treasure hunt that goes on in my head – a combination of humor, personal thoughts, rich textures, found images and vibrant color.
— Danielle Krysa

Danielle is the writer behind the contemporary art site, The Jealous Curator, and the author of "Creative Block", "Collage", "Your Inner Critic Is A Big Jerk" and "A Big Important Art Book". Her work is in private collections in Canada, The United States and Europe. She has a BFA in Visual Arts, and a post-grad in graphic design and lives with her family in British Columbia.

How I Got Over My Imposter Syndrome
Photo by Emily Grace Photography

Photo by Emily Grace Photography

By Ekaterina Popova

When I first started putting myself out there with both my own artwork and in the early stages of Create! Magazine, I had to overcome a ton of fears and limiting beliefs about my place in the art world. Eventually, I realized that it simply takes time to get used to selling my paintings and launching a creative business. It’s uncomfortable at first, often feels unnatural, and you may even feel like a fraud in the process. But after your first few sales or other successes, you will start getting into the swing of things.

Though imposter syndrome may never entirely go away, we learn to build confidence by doing our work and sharing it with the world. The truth is, if you live with the mentality that humans are created as equals, then you will believe that we each have the absolute right to pursue our passion, put ourselves out there, and make a life and career we love. A lot of what holds us back is not a lack of time, money, or materials, but our feelings of unworthiness. Some of my biggest obstacles in the early stages of my career were being scared of silly, made-up problems, such as “what if this is the last good painting I make or sell?”, “what if all this money goes away?” (spoiler alert: with that mentality, it definitely will) and “what if something bad happens as a result of my success?” I even worried about not ‘looking like’ an artist (what does that even mean?).

Of course, I still have my share of anxieties and insecurities when taking risks and putting myself out there, but by continuing to pursue my dreams despite my fears, I’m learning that it’s usually much less scary than I initially imagine. There is more than enough room for all of us creatives to find success and our place in this industry. The only way to fight fear of doubt or disapproval is by staring it straight in the eye and doing it anyway. Share your artwork, submit that application, or write a grant proposal that terrifies you (or at least makes you a little uncomfortable). In so many instances, we’re the only ones who think that an opportunity, show, job, or gallery is ‘out of our league’ when it’s actually not. Show up exactly as you are right now, not when a fancy critic approves of you, when you get signed by a gallery, or when someone buys your work. Show up exactly as you are at this moment in time and be proud of what you do and who you are.

When I first started selling my art, it was priced ridiculously low. It was almost embarrassing how cheap I made my paintings, but I kept going and pushing myself. After each sale, I would slowly increase my prices, feel more like a professional, and upgrade my artist profile. Nobody can do this for you. Take your time and grow at a pace that feels natural, but I urge you to never wait for anyone’s permission or approval. You are the only person responsible for elevating yourself and lifting yourself higher in your life and career. I had to learn this the hard way.

Several years ago on a trip to Miami during Art Basel Week, I had one of my favorite experiences that illustrates the lies of imposter syndrome. I was completely broke. At this point in time, I had already left my day job but was in the process of rebranding the magazine after a business partnership breakup. With about $80 to my name, and a hefty credit card bill to top things off, I packed my bags and headed to the airport.

I was fortunate enough to be nominated by my mentor Bridgette Mayer for an exhibition at Art Miami Fairs. I was honored to be included, but literally had to scrape together every last penny I had in order to travel. The exhibition was sponsored by Diamonds Unleashed and I was invited to come to their cocktail party before the fair. Insecurities about my outfit, a few extra pounds induced by stress, and my lack of money, felt like rocks in the pit of my stomach. But I mustered up the courage to go and used my last few dollars to Uber to the event. Even though I did not feel ready or good enough, I knew that for me to climb out of the current pit that I was in, I had to start showing up for myself and become the person that I wanted to be.

When I arrived at the party, it was even more extravagant than I imagined. I surveyed the scene of this large, oceanview apartment complete with white leather couches, an impressive collection of contemporary art, and trays of champagne floating around the room. I was sure I didn’t belong. Much to my relief, however, the attendees were some of the friendliest people I had ever met. I began chatting with designers, art dealers, artists, and art collectors who were all brought together through this organization for their love of art. Nobody cared that I didn’t wear a designer dress or that I was an emerging artist trying to make things work. They just wanted to see my paintings and hear my story. I will never regret stepping out of my comfort zone to attend this event.

Of course, not every situation in life will go this smoothly, but it’s important to remember that even intimidating individuals, who appear to have everything you don’t, had to start somewhere too and would never have arrived at where they are now if they didn’t face their demons head-on. It’s often our own insecurities that prevent us from putting ourselves into situations that can help us the most. I got so much confidence from the simple fact that I could have a conversation with a famous art dealer that evening.

If you are worried about all the things you are not, or all the skills you don’t yet have, I urge you to take a moment and see yourself for everything you are. Ask yourself, what have you accomplished so far? What are you most proud of? Where do you want to go next? Don’t leave any room for doubts and negativity, especially when it comes to your art. Imagine the person who needs to experience what you create in yourself and don’t deprive them of that joy. Say yes to showing up and sharing your gift and watch the magic unfold in your life.

P.S. If you enjoyed this article, you may like our podcast, Art & Cocktails. You can listen to it for free on iTunes, Spotify and more.

Clémentine Bal
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I was born in Paris in 1979. I studied at the Fine Arts Annecy and Dijon.

In my studio, I purify, mix, and transform animal shapes to recompose characters I like to surround myself with. They are for me like little benevolent divinities, sweet and sensitive. Eyes closed, they are in an interiority, as in meditation. What emerges from their attitude reflects the long process of creation. I superimpose on each other layers of inert materials that will be long and gently sanded. I pamper each small part of these bodies, and the sanding becomes caress. The matte and velvety paint comes to rest on the rounded and purified forms. I try to transmit to them all the sweetness possible.

www.clementinebal.com

Studio Sunday: María Guzmán of Austère & Crudo Atelier
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I recently had the chance to speak with Costa Rican fashion & textile designer María Guzmán in her studio, which is housed in a beautifully quaint Victorian-style residence in San Jose that she inherited from her grandmother. She is the brains behind Austère, a women-run and eco-conscious brand of swimwear and elevated basics. Built from her background working in the fashion industry in both Argentina and Europe, María’s company will be celebrating its fifth year in business come October. Having lived abroad for a number of years, she returned to Costa Rica around nine years ago. Not exactly sure of what she would do next, but certain that she was tired of working for companies that didn’t meet her standards for sustainability, she first lived at the beach and dove into painting. María’s creativity eventually led her to design dresses. Then, after a friend helped her connect the idea of incorporating her paintings into her work, she started making colorfully printed swimsuits as well.

It is clear early on in our conversation that art is an integral part of her business. The prints used in María’s bikinis and one-piece bathing suits come from her own sketches and gouache paintings that she then finalizes on the computer. Looking closely at the fabrics, you notice the deliberate choices of her various color palettes. Bright and fun without being too flashy, she explains the inspiration behind each pattern, calling one ‘feminist camouflage’ and saying that others were inspired by contemporary art or the environment. Like mini abstract paintings, each piece that María makes is unique as much as it is comfortable, functional, and sustainable.


Apart from her fashion design work, however, María also runs a second business called Crudo Atelier. From her same spacious studio, she holds weekend workshops in Costa Rica where small groups take classes such as hand lettering, embroidery, or how to make natural dyes. Now three years old, Crudo Atelier was initially a way for María to share her creative skills with others. It has grown since then, with her moving away from teaching and instead inviting new specialists to diversify the offering of classes. One of the aspects of these workshops that she loves most is the idea of creating community. Like-minded creatives meet each other through her platform and have gone on to continue working together afterwards. She also mentions that students have started projects based on the work they first produced at Crudo Atelier.

As focused as she is on her own businesses, she has an equal interest in paving the way for the next generation. Besides Crudo Atelier, María also serves on a council with the local chamber of commerce and the contemporary art and design museum along with ten other representatives. With this group, she seeks to build out more resources for designers of all types in Costa Rica and additional opportunities to show and sell their work. With stores in the area taking high commissions on locally produced items, especially those created by women, she hopes that this task force can put together more fairs or similar events and spaces that allow makers to have direct access to new customers.

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With so many things going on already, it’s hard to imagine María having time to do much else! However, she’s also currently working on an an ecommerce website to make her collections available beyond the few local and international stores where her items are currently sold. In addition, she’s begun the process of designing low-impact handbags made from wood and wool fibers alongside her other pieces. If all goes well, her portfolios will be shown at Satisfactory, a local design popup in San Jose. While she loves her studio space, she’s also in the middle of renovating it to make it more practical for her businesses. Once that is complete, one of her other goals is to eventually utilize it as a gallery for women artists. The space will then be even more of a hub for all of the things that she believes in: building community, creating quality and sustainable designs, and empowering other female artists.

Learn more about Austère by following the brand on Instagram at @austere_atelier or check out Crudo Atelier’s profile at @crudoatelier!

Studio Sunday: Kristen Elizabeth
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We’re bringing back Studio Sundays and this weekend we’re so excited to be introducing you to one of our PxP Contemporary artists, Kristen Elizabeth! Learn more in our interview below and then don’t forget to check our her available works in our premiere exhibition ‘Pilot’, which is currently on view online!

Artist Biography:

Connecticut based artist, Kristen Elizabeth (b.1986) formally educated in Industrial Design, has been developing her unique artistic voice over the past several years. Having grown up on the coast, she is heavily influenced by the sea and the dynamic tension between power and balance that can be observed around us. Her work seeks to draw viewers in through bold movement and a counterbalance of intricate mark making. Her use of a wide variety of materials such as acrylic, graphite, pastel, and more creates a visual statement that can be experienced on multiple levels. In addition to her art, she has been involved in many creative projects including painting a 50ft tall likeness of Lebron James in Harlem's famed Rucker Park, as well as - developed a new logo and fashion illustrations for New York's influential FABB charity event.  Her work has been featured in multiple publications including Create! Magazine, Art Reveal Magazine, and The Wall Street Journal.  

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How did you first become interested in art and can you explain a bit of how it led you to the work you create today?

As long as I can remember, I’ve always had a passion for art. I grew up in a creative family and had practicing artists on both my mother & father’s side. I’ve always had a desire to be creative, but felt I had to be practical. Because of this, I majored in product design and was approaching graduation right at the beginning of the recession in 2008. The career and life I had been envisioning for the past four years all but evaporated, but this allowed me freedom from a traditional path and ultimately set me on the course to where I am today. It’s been quite a ride - with both highs and lows. I hope to express this dynamism that is life through my current and future works.

Describe your current studio or working area. What is most important about it or one thing that you definitely need in your creative space?

I currently divide my time between my small home studio and a larger studio space where I run my business, a children's art studio called SplatterBox. My space at home is peaceful, harmonious and filled with the books, art, and music I love. That space allows me to focus on smaller more contained works using mostly watercolors and inks. SplatterBox allows me the room to stretch out and work on larger pieces without worrying about making a mess - hence the name SplatterBox. That said, it can be a challenge! It can often be hectic & stressful but it is also highly rewarding. I was able to not only lead a fulfilling path teaching kids but also re-discover my passion for art amongst all the glitter, unicorns, & beautiful mess.

Tell us about the inspiration behind your work.

I really try to absorb my environment. I find the people and places around me to be incredible resources. I’ve found that some series tend to draw from specific experiences, while other inspiration could be found in more ethereal experiences. My ‘Mineral Girl’ series was completely inspired by a trip to the amazing mineral room at the Peabody Museum in New Haven, CT. To contrast that, my ‘Geo Swoosh’ & ‘'The Change’ series took from something much more intuitive and deep within myself. I spent much of my childhood by the sea and observed everything from grey misty mornings to deep dark raging storms. Drawing from these visual memories as well as exploring life experiences I had, helped guide my hand.  You can see this in everything from the large sweeping motions to the tapestry of delicate details and patterns.

What one piece of creative or business advice would you give to your younger self?

The one piece of advice I would give my younger self is DON’T WAIT. On pessimistic days I might see it as time wasted, but I have had a range of other experiences and challenges that inform my art today. That said, I held back from truly jumping into my art career for many years and wish I had started that path sooner. It can be intimidating to put yourself out there, but if you keep delaying and putting it off - you’ll never know what opportunities might come your way.

What are you working on now and for the rest of the year?

Right now I’m coming off of an exciting job working for FABB (The Fashion Accessories Benefit Ball) & can’t seem to stray from creating high contrast fashion illustrations. I’ve found these very cathartic and they allow me to create without the pressure of a series or having any constraints imposed (self or otherwise). I’m happy to say they have enabled me to gain a clear headspace and I now have two new series I’m in the process of designing. Both will be an expansion & evolution of my previous work. As a side note, I have to give a nod to the Podcast - Art & Cocktails - for the invaluable information learned while listening to the episode ‘How To Design A New Series’.

View her collection of available works with PxP Contemporary here!

Good Vibes Only: Negativity in the Art World and How to Fight it
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The more we put ourselves out there, the more people will share their opinions of us and our work - both good and bad. It’s amazing to have people express interest in your art on social media and especially in person. We hope that you appreciate the encouragement, internalize that you are deserving of the positive support, and enjoy returning the compliments as much as Kat and I do! But as they say, it’s not always sunshine and roses. It’s likely that you’ve encountered negativity in the art world and it can be difficult to be at your best when the attitude of others doesn’t match your own. I’ve broken down a few common situations below to identify and overcome these unnecessary sources of drama!

Ignoring the ‘Starving Artist’ stereotype

“So what are you going to do with that?” was a question that I would often get from people when I told them that I was studying towards a BFA (and when I was in grad school for my MA in Art History too!). My response was almost always met with a look best described as halfway between puzzled and concerned. After working in the arts for the past ten years, however, I feel more empowered in this field now more than ever. For example, while there is still tons of progress to be made, we are seeing more women and people of color taking charge and making their way into the roles and institutions that had previously been out of reach. Choosing to pursue a creative career shouldn’t feel like it limits your options. From exhibiting nationally and abroad, working for galleries and art fairs to museums and non-profits, starting a business, writing a book, and more, it isn’t what can an artist do...it’s what can’t we do?

It took me quite some time to arrive at the realization that my possibilities were not limited by what others think artists are capable of. While it can be disheartening that not everyone will be 100% supportive of your goals, you don’t need anyone else’s permission to follow your passion. When you put yourself in the mindset that anything can happen, things can surprise you in the best way!

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Minding your Ps and Qs

When Kat and I went to Miami in December 2018, what really stood out to us was the incredible variety of art that we saw (at over ten fairs!). This is one of the things that we appreciate most about this industry: the art world IS big enough that everyone can find their place in it. Not everyone will be represented by blue chip galleries or exhibit in museums, but you do not need to do either of those things to find supportive collectors and share your work with people from around the world. With this in mind, push yourself to be a savvy networker: keep business cards with you, have a memorable elevator pitch ready to go, and don’t be afraid to speak up about your accomplishments.

Here’s an example:

Kat and I stopped at a booth to admire a piece we liked. A man walking by paused next to us to introduce himself as the creator of the work, explain a bit about it, and as he was on his way to do something else just quickly ended the conversation by saying: “Thanks so much for looking at my work. Here’s my card. Please keep in touch!” Keep your business interactions professional and polite, which will ensure that you leave a great impression.

The art world is great for making new connections and finding your niche, but be very careful about burning bridges. It is so unfortunate that for as much good as social media has done for artists, it has also given some people the false notion that they should use it to criticize others. Whether it’s posting disrespectful comments or even trying to preface a remark with “I don’t mean to be negative but…”, engaging in that kind of behavior online will guarantee that the other person will not want to work with you. What if down the road they are the link to a big opportunity that you would have loved to be a part of?

I’m sure you’ve also seen the comments that start off with “sorry to be the one to say this but…”, as if this excuses poor behavior. They’re never from someone who writes criticism as their profession. Rather, it is a cheap way of putting aside guilt when they know that the second half of what they’re going to say is unnecessary and negative. It is highly unlikely that any person with a valid reason for being critical of something would apologize for it.

The same holds true with overreacting to not being selected for a gallery or exhibition. We know that it is disappointing and frustrating, especially if you’ve applied more than once. We’ve been there! You send your best work and hope that it will be picked, but sometimes it just doesn’t happen. I actually discuss rejection in much more depth both in our first book ‘The Smartist Guide: Essential Art Career Tips for Emerging Artists’ as well as on the Art & Cocktails podcast, but my best advice is to stay positive, try to be gracious, and move on. Something better is coming!

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Developing a thick skin

I strongly believe that artists should support artists rather than get sucked into competing with or comparing yourself to others and it is especially disappointing that even today, you still see women who think it’s okay to put down other women (why?!). Remember that everyone is on their own path and even if another artist is finding success that doesn’t mean that you never will. Jealousy will only distract you so keep working hard and be patient that your time will come when it’s meant to. It’s also important to bear in mind that people rarely post about the hard times and struggles that they go through. If all you see are sales and exhibitions, it may seem like an artist achieved ‘overnight success’ when in reality they had to put in blood, sweat, tears and years of effort!

Negative feedback or unsolicited advice (not actual constructive criticism) can feel annoying at best and devastating at worst. As your initial reaction might be defensive, first ask yourself if it is even worth it to continue a discussion with this person. If you still feel the need to respond do so concisely and politely, but don’t expect anything in return. It will be up to you to tune them out, delete their comments or even block them. Kat shared a quote with me a while back that really resonated with me that was something along the lines of “nobody doing more than you will criticize you, only someone doing less.” The people who go out of their way to bring you down are simply dealing with their own feelings of insecurity. While it’s unfortunate that they have to take it out on you, focus instead on the awesome people who are genuinely there to encourage you and what you do!

Kat and I are so happy that the community of readers of both Create! Magazine and The Smartist Guide is a positive place for artists to share, connect, grow, learn, support, and inspire or be inspired by one another. We know this isn’t always how it is and that it can be difficult not to let the fear of facing negativity interfere with or stop you from putting yourself out there. But if it is your dream to be an artist, we encourage you to do it anyway!


Cheers!
Alicia

alicia@createmagazine.com
@puigypics


May 1st is Collectors Day at Moniker Art Fair
Moniker London 2016. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Moniker London 2016. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

We’re just a few days away from Moniker Art Fair and in addition to all of the exciting things planned throughout its run, this year, the fair will be kicking off with a special opening event called Collectors Day. Read on to learn more!

Moniker Art Fair is pleased to introduce Collectors Day, a unique concept designed to encourage art buying from fairs, galleries and artists alike. Taking place on opening day, May 1st, 2019 at the fair’s new NoHo location, 718 Broadway, this exploratory initiative challenges and defies the traditional VIP vernissage for art fairs. Providing more than a VIP preview, the day fosters education and accessibility to art collecting through a series of talks and Q&A’s led by collectors, gallery directors, curators, and artists. Moniker’s second New York edition will take place on May 1-5, 2019.

Collectors Day will feature tours across the expansive, multi-level fair lead by Moniker Director Tina Ziegler. Special programming for the day will include panel discussions with art world professionals on a wide range of topics that matter both to veteran and emerging collectors including: how and why to collect contemporary art, the best way to approach building a collection, and investment opportunities and elitism within the art world.

Fair Director Tina Ziegler says, “Collectors Day means real, mature discussion on subjects that matter to our collectors. What are the pros and cons of buying direct from artists? How long can it take for art to mature significantly in value? How do I even begin collecting? These are all things we can and should answer, and we can’t wait to see the effect Collectors Day has on our guests.” Collectors Day will also host talks led by accomplished collectors, gallery directors, curators and artists. Moniker’s approach to the new programming for this New York edition is the latest in a series of initiatives that Moniker has undertaken over the last 10 years to make art collecting accessible to the public.

Photo courtesy of Evoca 1 and Moniker Art Fair.

Photo courtesy of Evoca 1 and Moniker Art Fair.

As part of the Collectors Day program collectors will have a chance to hear short presentations from galleries and Spotlight Artists. The 2019 New York edition continues to exemplify the fair’s commitment to exhibiting the depth and breadth of urban contemporary art from across the globe. 2019 New York edition participating galleries include Vinyl on Vinyl Gallery, Philippines; Mazel Galerie, Brussels; Damien Roman Fine Art, The Hamptons; Fousion Gallery, Barcelona with Spotlight artists WK Interact, Christian Boehmer, Evoca 1, ICY & SOT who are recognized leaders in the urban and new contemporary art movement.

Partners for the Collectors Day include: Art Money, Art Law, Barnebys Auction House, Greenpoint Innovators, It’s a Small World, Juxtapoz Magazine, Norwood Club, Soho House, and Tagsmart among others.

Opening of Moniker Art Fair 2019 | 3pm

Drinks Reception and welcome to the fair | 3pm - 4pm

Fair Tour with Fair Director Tina Ziegler | 4:30pm - 5:30pm

Each person will receive headsets for the tour so they can hear the tour throughout the fair. Each exhibitor will get 5 minutes to introduce their collection to the tour. This gives collectors a guided one-on-one with each gallery and artist.

Collecting Art 101: Starting a Collection | 5:30pm

This program explores questions every new collector should ask themselves: how do you define your personal taste as a collector? What type of collector are you? How to purchase art for passion and purpose?

Collecting Art 101: Investing in Art | 6:15pm

A round table discussion on how collectors control the market, why it’s important to collect in today’s climate, and the good and bad aspects of buying art on Instagram. Guest Speakers include: Derek Gores, Professional Artist, part of the Open Studios Program; Jonathan Levine, Director of Jonathan Levine Gallery (New York); Evan Pricco Editor-in-Chief of Juxtapoz Magazine; Damien A Roman, Director of Damien Roman Fine Art Gallery, The Hamptons; Yasha Young Director and Curator of Urban Nation Museum, Berlin; Tina Ziegler, Director and Curator of Moniker Art Fair.

Additional speakers and programming to be announced.

Mural program, Moniker London 2015. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Mural program, Moniker London 2015. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Dates:

Wednesday, 1st May
VIP Collectors Day: 3pm - 10pm
Ticket price: $75 (Including a $50 credit towards any purchased artwork)

Thursday, 2nd May
Public Opening: 12pm - 9pm

Friday, 3rd May
Fair Open: 12pm - 9pm

Saturday, 4th May
Fair Open: 11am - 8pm

Sunday, 6th May
Fair Open: 11am - 6pm

FREE Entrance Times:
Access to the fair is free to all members of the public for 90 minutes each day.
Thursday 12pm - 1:30pm
Friday 12pm - 1:30pm
Sunday 11am -12:30pm

Location
718 Broadway, NoHo, Manhattan, New York, 10003

Website
www.monikerartfair.com

Hashtag
#monikerNY19 #monikerartfair

Twitter
@monikerartfair

Instagram
@monikerartfair

Facebook
www.facebook.com/monikerartfair

Christian Böhmer Interview | Moniker Art Fair
Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

For our next preview feature from the upcoming Moniker Art Fair in New York, we’re sharing an interview with Christian Böhmer! Christian is a self-taught contemporary artist who creates large-scale murals along with drawings and paintings. He has exhibited work around the world including in Australia, Germany, The Netherlands, and Switzerland among others. Most recently, he completed a mural painting for the "one wall project" curated by the Urban Nation Museum of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. After learning more about his work and process, we’ll certainly be looking forward to seeing what he exhibits at the fair!

Tell us about your background. You describe having roots in the graffiti movement of the 90's so was this the type of art that first inspired you and that you first created? 

Yes, graffiti was the kind of art that influenced me most when I was a kid in the mid-nineties. I was lucky enough to live only a few kilometers from Europe’s largest legal graffiti hall of fame at that time, which was the famous "Schlachthof Wiesbaden". Once a year, there came the world’s most famous writers together to have a graffiti jam for one weekend. I was so fascinated to see what was possible to do just with a spray can, that I decided to try this on my own. As it was a legal spot to paint graffiti, there was no need to hurry or to get nervous. I think this is why I had time enough to experiment in every direction, which included painting characters, too. I found out that I had much more talent in character painting then in writing letters....

How has your work developed since then? When and why did you turn to portraits? 

The first few years I developed in painting characters and as I got better and better, I moved towards a photorealistic style. I believe the most difficult subject one can paint in photorealism is a portrait, where there are no mistakes allowed. And when you dive into this world of painting portraits, you find out that there’s a lot of stories you can tell with that kind of art.

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Images courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Images courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Can you explain your reasoning behind covering various body parts of your subjects - namely their heads and faces, but also in recent work, their hands as well?

As I said, it is very interesting to tell stories within portraits. I did that for a long time, but one day you ask yourself, what will be the next challenge? What else can I add to these stories? When you think about that, the next logical step will be to transform the portrait, to paint it in an abstract way. But the abstract in my portrait painting is not the transformation of color or shape, but the paper bag. I found out that for me this is a perfect medium to use in order to transform shape, to give it a message, or to simply hide the face itself. Sometimes less is more :)

You recently completed a new mural in Berlin, congratulations! How did that project come about? How often do you create larger, public works and do you enjoy it as much as your smaller pieces? 

It was Yasha, the director of the Urban Nation Museum of urban contemporary art in Berlin, who asked me to paint this specific wall. I just began working on a new series of drawings, which plays with red colored hands, that tell all those stories that hidden faces can’t tell. This series deals with people on the edge of society, the ones nobody listens to. And the wall I painted in Berlin is located in an area where these people live. So it was the perfect match.

Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

What will you be showing at Moniker in New York? 

I will be showing this new series of people with red hands hidden behind their paper bag mask. But you need to see it in person!

Do you have any additional exciting projects going on in 2019 and beyond that you'd like to share?

Yes, I will have a huge solo show in Mainz, Germany in September. I’m very glad to be there because that is the place where I grew up and where I had my first graffiti writing experience. I have not been back there for more than 15 years!

I will also have a group show in October at 19Karen Gallery near Brisbane in Australia, which I’m also looking forward to. I love the idea that people from all over the world can have the opportunity to see my art in person.

Moniker will be held May 1 - 5 in New York City at:
718 Broadway
NoHo, Manhattan
New York City, NYC
10003

Learn more about Moniker Art Fair by visiting their website.

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Evoca1 Artist Feature | Moniker Art Fair
Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

We’re just a few short weeks away from Moniker Art Fair which will be held May 1-5, 2019 in New York City. The international fair’s 2019 exhibitors include some of the world’s most renowned urban & contemporary artists and galleries in booth exhibitions as well as solo presentations and installations. 28 exhibitors and four special projects, hailing from 13 countries around the globe, will present work in alignment with this year’s theme, Cause & Effect, which examines our shared roles and commitment to addressing the current state of political, social and ecological issues. Create! will be providing coverage of the fair, but we’re also excited to be bringing you a sneak peek at some of the artists who will be highlighted at this year’s NYC edition of Moniker. Last week we introduced you to WK Interact and this week we’re sharing the incredible work of Evoca1!

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Evoca1 was born in the Dominican Republic, where he spent most of his childhood drawing on walls and playing baseball, until eventually moving to Hollywood, Florida at age 11. 

As an autodidact, he has received his art education from the compulsive study of the old masters’ works and techniques. His pieces are a personal reflection of his life experiences, as well as observations of human behaviors and social struggles.

He currently lives and works out of South Florida, where he continues to develop his craft and research of figurative painting. In recent years, this mainly happened in public spaces where he has painted large-scale murals. His interaction with the local environments has been essential in generating the concept of his work.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

For more information about Moniker please visit their website and follow along with Evoca1 on Instagram.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

WK Interact Interview | Moniker Art Fair
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Create! Magazine is a proud partner of Moniker International Art Fair which will be held in May in New York City. Moniker shines a spotlight not only on young and emerging artists, but also on leaders in the urban and new contemporary art movement. For the forthcoming iteration of the fair, they will be highlighting one of NYC’s most recognized wheat pasting artist, WK Interact. Originally from France, WK Interact has been working in New York for over 20 years. Read our interview below to learn more about his work!

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Tell us about your background. Were you interested in art as a child or did you come to it later in life?

Well, I started to draw when I was 8 years old as my father was a painter. I think I became passionate about art from seeing him in his studio.

What brought you to New York?

I was first in New York when I was 13 years old, but did not have a chance to visit as I had only landed there for a connecting flight to Miami. I came back at age 16 in 1982 and it ended up having an incredible impact on me. My flight arrived late at night and I only knew the address of my hotel on 82nd street near Central Park. Of course, it was the cheapest place to stay and the worst hotel at $15 per night. I spent the next three months traveling all over the state using Greyhound buses and after this, I decided to focus on creating art ‘in motion’. At the age of 18, I came up with a process of making distorted images using a Xerox copy machine which helped me find my signature style. After placing many canvases in my hometown in the south of France illegally, it was obvious to me that the best city to create that sort of interaction with my work would be New York. I ended up living in the city for many years and became a french New Yorker. I’m still living there today!

How has living there affected your work?

Living in New York for me was important to just be there and connect with the city. For my work, I feel that it becomes part of an event or a corner of the street. Even I start to blend in with my work by wearing all black clothes.

Can you explain your interest in figures and your unique techniques to create your work?

My work is based on the following concept: First illustration, then the location, then the motion interacting with the scale of the building. My real motivation is film. I decide to use the street to recreate a story and take photos with people passing by. The interaction part of my concept and process is where I came up with the name WK INTERACT.

What are some of your inspirations?

Sculptors and photographers like Calder and William Klein as well as the film industry including French Connection, Blade Runner...and so many others.

What will you be exhibiting at Moniker?

I  will have one large work and 8 posters plus a large print directly installed on a wall.

Besides showing with Moniker, do you have any other projects this year you'd like to share?

Plenty of projects, but I can’t mention anything yet :)

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Moniker Art Fair has earned a reputation as one of the most exciting contemporary art fairs with it’s roots embedded in urban culture. Learn more by visiting their website or follow them on Instagram.

Moniker Art Fair | New York May 1-5, 2019
Tina Ziegler, Fair Director. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Tina Ziegler, Fair Director. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Create! Magazine is excited to be partnering with Moniker Art Fair for its 11th edition in New York this spring. Read on to learn more about what exciting things you can look forward to at this incredible contemporary art fair!

This May 1 - 5, Moniker Art Fair returns to New York, welcoming international and local collectors to a five-day celebration of New Contemporary Art in Manhattan.

Moniker Art Fair is an acclaimed contemporary art fair with urban influences, which has for 10 years delighted collectors and art lovers in both New York and London with hyper-curated, fully-immersive and broad-scope events.

The next edition, held 1 - 5 May 2019, will dominate the heart of the New York art scene in its 15,000 square-foot venue in NoHo, continuing the never-conventional, always-pioneering fair format that has launched the careers of numerous artists in the past decades in partnership with international galleries.

Moniker has become the go-to for art collectors to learn more about the contemporary art world and to buy art assured by the curation, instinct and advice of professionals.

Moniker London 2018. Photo credit: Sam Roberts.

Moniker London 2018. Photo credit: Sam Roberts.

NEW YORK EXHIBITORS LIST

INTERNATIONAL GALLERIES

GAREY THE THIRD | LA & Hong Kong

FIERCELY CURIOUS | Brooklyn

MAZEL GALERIE | Brussels & Singapore

FOUSION GALLERY | Barcelona

VINYL ON VINYL | The Philippines

ROMAN FINE ART | The Hamptons

CAKE AGENCY | Chicago, Illonois 

11.12 GALLERY | Moscow, Russia

LIVING ART GLOBAL | UK

ANALOG CONTEMPORARY | Philadelphia

PERSEUS GALLERY | New York

 

OPEN STUDIOS

SIRIS HILL | UK

FATHERLESS | Illinois

DEREK GORES | Florida

BURAK KARAVIT | Istanbul

NICK FEDAEFF | Russia

ARTHUR BECKER | New York

TXEMY & AMAIA ARRAZOLA | New York

 

SPOTLIGHT ARTISTS

EVOCA 1 | Dominican Republic

CHRISTIAN BOEHMER | Cologne

WK INTERACT | New York

ICY & SOT | Iran

YOK & SHERYO | The Philippines

ARINZE STANLEY | Nigeria

NUNO VIEGAS | Portugal

Photo credit: Icy & Sot. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Photo credit: Icy & Sot. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

FAIR SCHEDULE 2019

Wednesday 1 May 2019
Collectors Day: 3pm-7pm 
VIP Celebration: 7pm - 10pm
$75 (Includes $50 towards your first original artwork purchase)

A program of educational talks, panel discussions and networking sessions
around collecting contemporary and urban art.

Thursday 2 May 2019 
Public Opening | 1pm - 5pm 
Opening Celebration | 5pm - 9:30pm 
$25

General Fair Days
Friday 3 May | 1 - 10pm 
Saturday 4 May | 12 - 8pm 
Sunday 5 May | 11am- 6pm 
$15

STUDENTS AND SENIORS

Students can visit Moniker free of charge. A valid student ID will be required before entry.

Seniors (65+) ticket price is $10 (+booking fee) with code: REDUCED.

FAIR ACCESS

Children under the age of 16 do not need a ticket to visit the fair.

Well behaved leashed pets are welcome on site.



For more information, please visit their website: https://www.monikerartfair.com/ or follow them on Instagram.

Photo credit: WK Interact. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Photo credit: WK Interact. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Solo Show of Harlem artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London | April 1-13, 2019
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FACTION Art Projects is delighted to present a solo show of Harlem-based artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London. Following an exhibition of Squirewell’s work at FACTION’s Harlem space, the FACTION team is bringing him to London for a display of multilayered collages, which through elements of mythology, sacred geometry and science, tackle themes of race and memory. This marks Squirewell’s first solo show outside the US. A Private View of the exhibition will be held on April 2, 2019 from 6-9pm.

Squirewell’s newest works, which have evolved over two or three years of archival study and exploration, are heavily influenced by a recent revelation of his paternal ancestry.

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Squirewell says:

‘For most of my life I believed my family were African Americans who had arrived to the US on slave ships, and it wasn’t until my twenties that I discovered my true heritage, that they were indigenous Americans. As a teacher working closely with the national curriculum I constantly see how history, even now, is curated. My art attempts to rewrite these assumed histories. The beauty of the works capture the viewer, but it’s the ugly that intrigues and leads them to look deeper.’

Rediscovering his ancestry has prompted Squirewell to question his identity, particularly in the western hemisphere. It also speaks to his battle with the omnipresent slavery narrative, when he himself comes from a black family that is not believed to have a history of slavery. Through portraiture he challenges histories and presents a more empowering narrative for black identity, seeking to change the terminology around the very word ‘black’.

The portraits have a16th, 17th and 18th century aesthetic with a contemporary awareness. The depicted figures are both real historical figures and fictitious characters that are in some way related to the artist. Through demonstrating the misrepresentations of history, they critique what we colloquially describe as fact. Each artwork is complete only after he ceremoniously burns both the collage and its hand carved frames which include motifs and markings from ancient indigenous American and African cultures.

The titles of Stan Squirewell’s works reference particular moments in our shared history. One work entitled ‘Willendorf’, is inspired by the prehistoric female figure of ‘Venus of Willendorf’, while another, ‘Amerindian’ refers to the ‘$5 Indians’ - those who, 125 years ago, paid for falsified documents that proved them to be Native American.

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About Stan Squirewell:

Stan Squirewell was born and raised in Washington, DC and currently lives and works in Harlem, New York. His artistic training began at the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. Since graduating he has continued his tutelage under many of DC’s legends including artists Michael Platt and Lou Stovall. Squirewell, is a painter, photographer, installation and performance artist. His work is multilayered and his subject matter tackles themes such as: race and memory through mythology, sacred geometry and science. He draws his inspiration from theory books, science fiction movies and novels, avant-garde jazz and indigenous storytelling. He is a (2007 MFA) graduate of the Hoffberger School of Painting where he studied with the late, Grace Hartigan. Squirewell is the first winner of the Rush Philanthropic and Bombay Sapphire Artisan series. He has performed with Nick Cave (SoundSuits) at the National Portrait Gallery and Jefferson Pinder with G-Fine Arts. He is privately and publicly collected, his works are in the Reginald Lewis Museum, the Robert Steele Collection and recently acquired by the Smithsonian for the African American Museum (2015.) Squirewell is currently exhibited as part of ‘Fashioning the body’ at projects+gallery in St. Louis alongside Bisa Butler, Soly Cissé, Renee Cox, David Antonio Cruz, Kenturah Davis, Hassan Hajjaj, Basil Kincaid, Mario Moore, Chris Ofili, Fahamu Pecou, Katherine Simóne Reynolds, Jacolby Satterwhite, Mickalene Thomas, and Kehinde Wiley.

About FACTION Art Projects:

FACTION is a flexible collective, from the team behind the hugely successful Gallery 8 and Coates & Scarry in London, who have created a unique model for artists and gallerists to work together. FACTION addresses the changing market place and the erosion of the traditional art market, where galleries were gatekeepers for artists. FACTION provides artists with promotion and opportunity to access collectors and a wider audience, with all the support of a gallery but without the constraints of the traditional model. They aim to deliver a program of artists that is diverse and inclusive. FACTION launched in February 2018 at Gallery 8 in Harlem, New York and since then has become strongly imbedded in the Striver’s Row community and a highlight of Harlem’s cultural scene.

For more information please contact Anna Beketov, anna.beketov@damsonpr.com, +44 (0)20 7812 0645

Are you making the one mistake that is keeping your art from being featured?
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We’ve seen it happen time and again and artists have asked us about this when considering what to submit to our magazine or new gallery, PxP Contemporary. Think that including images from multiple series of works will double or triple your chances of being selected for that juried show, publication or gallery you’ve dreamed of showing with? Well, unfortunately, that’s not likely the case. I know that it’s tempting to want to show off the range of your style and creative ability, but here’s why this isn’t the time to do so.

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  • Demonstrate to the juror that you’ve taken time to really develop an idea, push yourself and stick to it! When you focus on one subject for a while, you get a much better idea of what works and what doesn’t and this helps you build your creative voice. Always keep in mind that submitting your work is like a leaving a first impression. If you have pieces from two bodies of work it can give off the vibe that you don’t quite know who you are yet as an artist or that you’re not confident enough in either series to commit to it fully. I’ll borrow from Kat here and say that you should always be sharing work that excites you! Which paintings, drawings, sculptures, or (insert whatever incredible work you create here) are you most excited about right now? Those are what you should be submitting!

  • Sometimes, it’s purely practical. For publications especially, it is difficult to consider an artist if we wouldn’t be able to put together a consistent spread with their work. Each book, journal, or magazine will have a distinct aesthetic so make it easy for them to know that you are the right fit and to feature your work. The same applies to a gallery, which has to make sure that your work could fill their space and look professional. They are also looking out for their collectors, who come to them specifically for their curatorial expertise. Rather than show them everything in the hopes that they end up buying something (with the risk of overwhelming them), a good dealer will work with the client to help them find something they love from a narrower selection based on their interest and budget. Collectors do often want to see a variety of works, but still within the same theme or style.

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  • If you are equally satisfied with several bodies of work at the moment, I’d still recommend only applying with one or at least one at a time. The biggest issue with this is that you’re leaving the curator to fill in the blanks and assuming that they can or will. How is someone who is not familiar with your work supposed to imagine what the rest of a series looks like when they’ve only seen a few pieces from it? You know that a whole group of works exists that are as great as the ones you’ve submitted, but the curator does not. If they have to go through hundreds or even thousands of artist submissions, they won’t always have the time to go looking through your website or Instagram account to see if you’ve made others like the one or two that they did like.

  • If you’ve recently started a new body of work that you’re wondering if you should start putting out there, make sure it’s ready. Do you have enough works from this series completed and photographed? If not, what’s the rush? There will be more opportunities to apply to. You can keep submitting from an earlier series for now if you want and if there is no restriction from the organization on how recent the work must be or simply allow yourself the time to fully dive into this great new idea.

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Of course, none of this is to say that you have to stick to the same thing forever. No, on the contrary, because it would be hard to have repeat collectors if your work never develops. Your gallery, if you have one, and your collectors simply want to see you continue to grow and will support you along the way!

If you’re making abstract sculptures, but have always wanted to try painting cats, go ahead! One of the greatest things about being an artist is having the freedom to experiment with your creativity. Ultimately, you have to DO YOU. But when it comes time to apply to that next exhibition opportunity, I hope you’ll consider the above and give yourself the best chance of being selected!

As always, both Kat and I are happy to answer any art career questions you have so please feel free to reach out to us: info@createmagazine.com or alicia@createmagazine.com and if you liked this article, check out the Art & Cocktails podcast or our new book The Smartist Guide for more tips.

Cheers and I wish you luck in applying to our current call for Issue 15 curated by Paradigm Gallery! Submit here.

-Alicia


Tiny Room For Elephants Festival in Philadelphia | April 19th-21st
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After speaking with the organizers, Create! Magazine is thrilled to be supporting TRFE and their upcoming event in April! Learn more about this exciting festival in Philadelphia that combines art, music and more below.

Tiny Room for Elephants Festival (#TRFE19) is a month long, collaborative, multi genre art and music experience, held throughout the month of April at Cherry Street Pier.  It is a living art ‘gallery’ that incorporates styles and mediums of 25+ Philadelphia artists painting/installing live from April 8th-April 17th. The finished works are celebrated on April 19th, April 20th and April 21st with live music, djs/producers, panels and interactive elements. 

The organizers, Dame & YaYa

The organizers, Dame & YaYa

The schedule of events is as follows:

Opening Exhibition 

Date: Friday, April 19, 2019

Time: 6:00pm-10pm

Fun Stuff:  Standing Room Only, A Wearable Art Show

Sounds: Camp Candle, Club Crusades, Eric Boss, Johnny Popcorn, Joshua Lang

Music Series

Date: Saturday, April 20, 2019

Time: 9:00am-9:00pm

Fun stuff:   Day Breaker (Tickets sold separately) "1000 Ways to Make It", panel moderated by Cosmo Baker; Live screen printing w/ Do It Now; Sticker Make & Take (Sticker Stampede); DIY Donut Station w/ Federal Donuts

Sounds: Aime, Cierra, Drew Mills, Emynd, Eric Boss, Expo, Femi, Jabair, John Morrison, Kayin x Sylo, Killiam Shakespeare, Kingsley Ibeneche, Mellowbastard, Pierson, Rover Rover, Shane tha Great, Suzanne Sheer, Tha Riva, The Bul Bey

Family Fun Day

Date: Sunday, April 21, 2019

Time: 12:00pm-6:00pm

Fun Stuff:  Easter Egg Hunt, World's Largest Kid's Sip n' Paint (tickets sold seperately), Sticker Make & Take (Sticker Stampede)

Sounds: Lee Jones & Friends

Sponsored in part by: YARDSPhiladelphia Weekly, HabithequeDo It Now T ShirtsFederal Donuts, Joe Werner ProductionsBlickTru WaveThe ParlorBeauMonde OriginalsChampionDWRC

Lucie Duban
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Based in Marseille, France, contemporary painter Lucie Duban deals with the unseen, astral plane of existence and the common bond by shared by every living being on the planet earth. Pulling influence from her studies of quantum physics and cosmology theory, she transports views into a dreamy, meditative realm of vibrant hues and translucent shapes interspersed across an unresolved oblivion. Each scene depicts the intimate connections shared between individuals that give way to all energy and light, as opposed to the materialistic, tech-obsessed world of tangible conveniences we immerse ourselves in today. In all, her work gives form to what she views as “a mandatory revolution of the collective consciousness” and “a quest for shamanism”. Throwing cynicism to the wind, she presents a beautiful re-interpretation of human existence on planet earth, guided by dream, escapism, and idealism, divorced from the tangled web of excessive commodification our modern societies choreograph themselves around.

Text by Nathalie Levey

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