Posts tagged Australia
Love in a Parallel Universe: Interview with Madelaine Buttini

Madelaine Buttini (Madbutt) is a visual artist from Brisbane, Australia currently exploring hand cut and digital collage using vintage and modern materials. In this episode, Maddie shares a beautiful, personal account of her life and creative journey. Enjoy our juicy chat about romance, changing careers, and following your instincts to find your artistic voice. We also discuss her current work and creative process behind her dreamy collages.

Bio

Madelaine Buttini (Madbutt) is a visual artist from Brisbane, Australia currently exploring hand cut and digital collage using vintage and modern materials. Madelaine aspires to bring a moment of happiness and hope from her artwork, especially for those who feel lost and alone in our busy and sometimes overwhelming society. Her work reflects on the challenges she has faced as a friend, girlfriend, and feminist.

Over the past year, Madelaine has been busy exhibiting in New York, London, and throughout the East Coast of Australia. In 2017, Madelaine's work was featured in VICE Magazine and vastly online after Lana Del Rey shared one of her first public works "Brigitte" to promote her single, "Love". Since then her collage artworks are within inspiration sections of fashion literature, book covers, and albums. She is a contributing artist for the Brooklyn based magazine, The Dispatch, run by Folk Rebellion. She has worked with clients such as Goop, The BBC, Calfia Farms, and Roland Mouret.  

As an artist Madelaine aspires to bring attention to important issues that affect a variety of communities. As someone who struggles with anxiety and depression, she aims to bring awareness about mental health issues by discussing her own struggles on social media [AS1] with her artwork. In June 2018, she discussed the issue of consent and female circumcision (FGM) at her first Sydney group exhibition. She has donated works to charity art auctions for Friends With Dignity, Beyond Blue, and The Heliotrope Foundation to help raise funds for those in need. 

Maddie's details: 

www.madbutt.com.au

www.instagram.com/madbutt

Anthony Lister's details:

www.instagram.com/anthonylister

Faust's details:

http://www.faustnewyork.com

 https://www.instagram.com/faustnewyork

Scottie Marsh's details:

http://scottmarsh.com.au/ https://www.instagram.com/scottie.marsh/

Sally West

Sally West is a leading expressionist and still life artist, whose professional artistic career has taken her all over the world, exhibiting, selling to private art collectors and winning prizes. Sally has been the winner of several notable prizes and regular finalist in a great number of prestigious competitions.

Sally draws her inspiration from the seascapes of Sydney and Bluey’s Beach where she is now based, and the rural Australian landscapes of central New South Wales where she grew up. Sally finds joy in creating a direct response to a moment in time and fully immerses herself in the environment by painting in plein air. She takes a fresh approach to the tradition, creating interesting textural surfaces with thick impasto brushstrokes.

 

 

Studio Sundays: Tahnee Kelland

I'm 34 and living in Dawesville, Mandurah Western Australia. I'm a self-taught artist and failed art in high school. Actually, I think I relieved an "E" on the report card. Is that worst than an F? Who knows. Could have had something to do with me painting/drawing what I wanted, not what I was told. Not much has changed. For the first 10 years After leaving high school, I hardly painted or drew a thing. My confidence was low and I never finished anything I started. At around 27 I picked up my pencils and committed to finishing anything I started. I promised myself to finish anything I started even if I hated it. I'm so glad I did that because it taught me about " the ugly stage". I feel like everyone has that ugly stage in their work where it's not quite looking it's best and all the fear and doubt creeps in over if it will even work. Then you push through and of course it does. I never knew that. I gave up before even trying. Now things are different and I've over come that hurdle.

Then there was the next challenge. Style. It's taken me about 6 or 7 years to find "my style". I was always looking for a short cut and hoping I'd find it over night. But all the advice I received was, unfortunately, correct it takes a lot of work and a lot of time. I also get bored easily so I'm not sure if that helped or hindered.

My most recent work feels like the closest to "my style" I've ever got. I love patterns on patterns, muted, dirty colors and fabric. So they feature heavily in each work. The women in the painting represent myself I guess. I've always been content in my own space with my thoughts, I can go weeks pottering around the house without seeing another human. A lot of people have questioned if this is healthy for my mental health and shone a negative light on having so much alone time. So I wanted to celebrate it. It doesn't have to be a bad thing to want to spend long periods with just yourself. I find that I grow as a person in the stillness.

www.tahneekelland.com

Anna Di Mezza 

Anna Di Mezza is a painter from New South Wales, Australia. She has a background in the study of graphic design and has also worked in the television animation industry as an inbetweener for Walt Disney. 

Her current body of work is Surrealistic in nature. They are collage-like arrangements of chance encounters, old Hollywood lovers and anachronistic retellings of history. Her work displaces characters from their homes in vintage photographs, jettisoning them into cold-washed, mountainous landscapes or setting them in front of fresh hewn crystals, displacing them into Alice in Wonderland irregular proportions. 

Her work is greatly influenced by the filmmaker David Lynch, whose films are like a journey to a parallel universe, which is a theme she aims for in her own work. The aim of the paintings is open to interpretation, as they seem pointedly unresolved. 

Tahnee Kelland 

I'm 34 and living in Dawesville, Mandurah Western Australia. I'm a self-taught artist and failed art in high school. Actually, I think I relieved an "E" on the report card. Is that worst than an F? Who knows. Could have had something to do with me painting/drawing what I wanted, not what I was told. Not much has changed. For the first 10 years After leaving high school, I hardly painted or drew a thing. My confidence was low and I never finished anything I started. At around 27 I picked up my pencils and committed to finishing anything I started. I promised myself to finish anything I started even if I hated it. I'm so glad I did that because it taught me about " the ugly stage". I feel like everyone has that ugly stage in their work where it's not quite looking it's best and all the fear and doubt creeps in over if it will even work. Then you push through and of course it does. I never knew that. I gave up before even trying. Now things are different and I've over come that hurdle.

Then there was the next challenge. Style. It's taken me about 6 or 7 years to find "my style". I was always looking for a short cut and hoping I'd find it over night. But all the advice I received was, unfortunately, correct it takes a lot of work and a lot of time. I also get bored easily so I'm not sure if that helped or hindered.

The work I've submitted, My most recent work feels like the closest to "my style" I've ever got. I love patterns on patterns, muted, dirty colors and fabric. So they feature heavily in each work. The women in the painting represent myself I guess. Ive always been content in my own space with my thoughts, I can go weeks pottering around the house without seeing another human. A lot of people have questioned if this is healthy for my mental health and shone a negative light on having so much alone time. So I wanted to celebrate it. It doesn't have to be a bad thing to want to spend long periods with just yourself. I find that I grow as a person in the stillness.

www.tahneekelland.com

Patricia Gonzalez 

Hello! I am a Venezuelan girl that has been living in Australia for the past four years. I grew up between paper sheets and crayons thanks to the colouring books that my parents used to give me all the time when I was a kid. Later on I studied illustration and it hasn't been a day where I don't paint or draw.

My inspiration comes from people and the variety of their colours, textures, beauty marks, etc. I also like to include plants or animals to complement my illustrations and paintings.

www.pattgonzalezart.com

Ben Crawford

Born in Cork, Ireland, Ben graduated from C.C.A.D in 2007 with a BA in Fine Art. He now lives in northern New South Wales, Australia, with his wife and daughter, painting from his studio situated on an organic banana plantation. 
 
'I've had an interest in the interaction between humans and the land since my college days. The idea that we can shape and transform the earth to our needs and aesthetic tastes has been around for thousands of years, but the landscape has an equally transformative effect on us as well; mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually. This ongoing dialogue is something that really fuels my work. 
 
I've been lucky enough to grow up in a very beautiful rural part of Ireland. Now I live in another lovely part of the world which happens to be in a relatively untouched wild country setting too. Living in these places has certainly influenced my perception of the world around me. My relationship with the land has become reflective in nature: I tend to project a lot of whatever I'm thinking about onto the landscape and it bounces those thoughts back to me in shapes, lines, textures, colours and composition. When I approach a painting, it's not so much to capture a representation of what I'm seeing, but more a way of filtering and recording that conversation between my brain and the landscape. This means sometimes surreal elements and semi-autobiographical narratives find there way into my work. Painting is a way for me to understand my place in the world. My part in the landscape.'

 You can view Ben's paintings in the flesh at Retrospect Galleries in Byron Bay, or online on Instagram. 

 www.bencrawfordart.com
 

Dogs, Cats and Cake: Interview with Artist Vanessa Stockard

Vanessa Stockard was born in 1975 in Sydney and spent her formative years in a small country town in the Mid North Coast of New South Wales.  At 12 she returned to Sydney and after graduating from the College of Fine Arts (COFA) Sydney in 1998 with a BFA, Stockard launched head first into the avant-garde art scene in the bohemian village of Glebe. 
 
Her ethereal works of art are a window into the soul of a talented and complex artist, one whose legacy is bound to resonate well past her generation.  The existential nature of her painting viscerally questions our concepts of social relationships and reality. 
 
Twenty years of introspection and experimentation, ranging over a number of media, have forged Vanessa’s style and vulcanised her craft, enabling her to reveal complex misdemeanours, while simultaneously demanding the viewer’s self-reflection.  She deals with isolation and sadness with intimate care and attention. 
 
anessa is unhindered by failure, always continuing the discovery of things previously unseen, revealing work that is fresh, unlaboured and penetrating.  The deceptive everyday nature of her subject matter belies hidden depths of relationship, feeling and emotion.  One could describe her process as absence of thought, a freedom of construct, not unlike the stream of consciousness associated with authors such as Hemmingway and Thomas Wolfe. 
 
If light and shade were students, she would be their master.  This skill, combined with a naturally deft hand and a determined use of perspective, imbue her subjects with gravitas.  The artist refers to set design elements that often alter and morph as her piece progresses.  She has said she feels grounded from her ability to draw from the benign surrounds of familiar life, infusing these images with a meaning that yields a meditative satisfaction. 
 
Stockard’s oeuvre features many pieces developed without any direct visual reference but rather from memory, often incorporating domestic pets such as cats and dogs.  Juxtaposing the anthropomorphic nature these animals are given by our society, she infuses the personification of virtue and vice into the everyday canine and feline status quo of our pets.  Cats with their fluffy comical exteriors glint with an instinctive urge to kill and cruelly torment their prey, dogs with their providence of happiness, loyalty and friendship are flung back onto Churchill’s menacing metaphor for depression. 
 
The Kafkaesque mindset behind such works is reminiscent of the existentialist authors like Sartre and Camus.  Absurdism appears with cake imagery and its relation to a childlike nostalgia for happiness which may never be real, but rather imaginary, unattainable and unachievable.  It’s been said “pain is inexhaustible, it’s only people who get exhausted…” 
 
One can never “have it all”, to be both the artist and patron.  To intrinsically understand those things around us that others overlook is what we want from our artists, our creatives.  They give voice to the profound mystery of the world around us, surrounded as we are with consumerism, pointless greed, deceit and dissatisfaction.  There’s no pretension here in these paintings, just spontaneous insight and beauty.  Some art is said to speak volumes, but these works are more like innocent and delicate poems, whispering untold truths with an economy of words.


We love the playful, whimsical way in which you depict cats and dogs. When did you first begin exploring this subject matter?

 Thank you! I have always enjoyed reading human traits in animals, cats can be so soft and toy-like, yet demonic too, dogs in their loyalty, just not where food is concerned. So that's 22 years worth so far and counting.

What do you look for when you start a painting. What inspires you?

Each day is different and I never know what's about to happen in the studio. My palette is chosen depending on my mood, an idea I might have been thinking about during the wakeful hours with my one year old often gets made into a painting the next day. What happens to that idea and how it morphs is a method of play and intuitive design. Usually, I find my work helpful in putting out real life issues and that translates pictorially by the end of the days work.

Describe your typical day. Do you make art full time or do you have other responsibilities outside of the studio?

I work 5 days a week in the studio painting, I would paint 7 days but I force at least one day off each week. I feel most content in myself when I am lost in a painting. 

How do you find balance and replenish your creativity?

That's very funny! I'm definitely not balanced but I clean the house and cook and do the damned laundry etc., and I read a paragraph a night of a random book before I pass out. 

What advice would you give artists trying to break out of their shell and try something fun in their work?

This is an interesting question and unless you are very lucky or a genius, finding your own voice takes time. It is hard to avoid either your teachers and or your peers influence at the same time as you are learning. I thoroughly encourage the act of play as an important part of learning, the happy accident can be a real turning juncture in finding your signature. Look at art in the flesh and paint what is around you, paint your life. 

What are you currently working on and what events should we be on the lookout for?

Currently I am learning to have more patience with a painting, to make sure it is really finished. Right now I am showing in New York with Vanrensburg galleries