Posts tagged Career
It's Not Luck (& Other Reasons Why Creatives Need to be More Vocal About Their Accomplishments)
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You’ve been accepted to a juried show, received a prestigious award, had an incredible review written about your work, or made a major sale. Congrats! It’s one of the best feelings in the world to know that others are supporting what you do. So why are we often hesitant to share the joy that we’re experiencing? Perhaps you’re shy and don’t want a lot of extra attention or think that going on about your accomplishments is boastful. While there is certainly a line between updating your community with exciting things that are happening and oversharing, there are a few key reasons why creatives, and especially women artists, need to be more vocal about their achievements.

I’m sure many of us have fallen into the trap of brushing away compliments. Rather than thanking someone for congratulating us on selling a painting or landing a gallery to represent our work, we’ll come up with an excuse to make the accomplishment sound like less than it is. “Oh, I got lucky” or “It’s not really a big deal” you might say, but that’s not true! Too many of us operate under the strange, outdated notion that it is more polite to negate a compliment than accept it. Even if the circumstances surrounding a particular moment of success seem serendipitous, you likely played an active role in making it happen for yourself. You made great work that was recognized by the juror (or curator, gallery, collector, etc) and you put yourself out there by applying to the opportunity or perhaps through networking and being active online. So stop giving anyone or anything else the credit. It’s not luck, it’s you.

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Always remember that it is important for your peers to know about your achievements. Why? Because you never know who can introduce you to your next, big opportunity and it may only take one new connection to catapult your career to the next level. Success in the arts often occurs like a domino effect, where one person will find your work and from that perhaps another will share it, and then another, and it keeps going from there. It’s almost as if the tastemakers in the industry have ‘FOMO’ and if one magazine or curator is featuring a certain artist, then others feel they should be too. Yes, they want to try and find the ‘next big name’ first, but once one influencer has identified a great new talent, others often follow soon after. You can help this process along for yourself by making sure that your community knows when you’ve been featured in a magazine or exhibition so that they can help share it too and potentially build buzz and momentum.

Making others aware of recent accomplishments also helps with name recognition. I’ll share a story here to help illustrate about a friend who recently went to an awards ceremony in the advertising industry. When his team was honored with their first trophy of the evening, he opted not to join the group onstage and when his colleagues asked why, he cited the same feelings of not needing the attention or wanting to look too proud. But then he realized, it’s not just an opportunity to celebrate with his team, it’s a chance for everyone else in the room to see that they produce high quality work for their clients. If you see the same person going up to accept multiple awards, then you’ll start to remember them and likely associate that person with being great at what they do (and maybe want to work with them in the future!). Therefore, try not to be shy about sharing that you’ve won awards or been given other important recognition. You should want your personal and especially your professional contacts to remember you for all of the great things you’ve done!

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Most importantly, however, you need to be vocalizing your successes because if you don’t then nobody will know about them. It sounds obvious that you need to be your biggest cheerleader, but we often don’t fully realize the consequences of not sharing good news. I once had a boss who started giving me fewer shifts than my two other peers. Confused, I confronted her about what I might be doing wrong or what I could be doing better. She didn’t have anything negative to say. Instead, she simply told me that the other two girls spoke up more often about the projects they were completing on a daily basis or the sales they had made and I didn’t. I was so surprised to hear that I wasn’t actually doing anything wrong. Even though I was selling just as much (or more!), keeping up with all of my work, and often staying late to do a little extra cleaning or to take on additional tasks, this one thing was holding me back.

I also read an article around that time which stated that believing you’ll get recognized just from keeping your head down and working hard unfortunately isn’t true and it’s women who tend to suffer the most from this misconception. With that in mind, it made more sense. As my employer usually worked from home rather than in the office, how was she supposed to differentiate my sales and projects from what the other girls were doing if I didn’t tell her specifically? So now, even if I still sometimes feel a bit reserved about ‘tooting my own horn’, I try to think of it as an integral part of promoting myself and push myself to do it in order to keep my career moving forward instead of stuck in the same place.

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Finally, even though it might feel a bit awkward at first, it’s very likely that your artist community really wants to celebrate your successes with you. There will always be negative people and those who struggle with jealousy, but your core support group will stand by your side. Just like they will be there for you when you’ve been rejected or are having a slow period, they also want to be a part of your high moments, especially if you’re going to pop that champagne ;) Cheers!

Of course, none of this is to say that there aren’t instances where a bit of good fortune plays a part in our lives. Some people have parents or other role models who supported their careers while some don’t and certain cities or countries provide more opportunities for working artists than others. Instead of focusing on things that can’t be changed, however, remember that there are so many examples of people who have overcome difficult circumstances and achieved success anyway, despite their obstacles or limited resources. This is about cherishing exactly those people and those moments. I’ll bet you can think of several examples of when you had to ‘make it work’ too. Be proud of those efforts, show how grateful you are for what you have, and perhaps even try to pay it forward to other artists you know who may need help or guidance.

We all go through highs and lows and it’s a powerful thing that more artists and people in general are being authentic about when they’re not having their best day. We don’t always need to see perfect lattes and curated travel photos. But part of being real is sharing when good things happen too, even when they are little victories. If you’re starting out, having a small show at a local cafe or selling your first work are totally worthy and incredible accomplishments. Share them! Not because it’s bragging or trying to make others think that you’re this great, successful artist (you already are one and don’t need anyone else’s opinion to prove it). Rather, it’s the chance for you to share something that you’re genuinely proud of and that excites you, which your followers and those who support your work will truly appreciate and celebrate too!

-Alicia
alicia@createmagazine.com
@puigypics

How I Got Over My Imposter Syndrome
Photo by Emily Grace Photography

Photo by Emily Grace Photography

By Ekaterina Popova

When I first started putting myself out there with both my own artwork and in the early stages of Create! Magazine, I had to overcome a ton of fears and limiting beliefs about my place in the art world. Eventually, I realized that it simply takes time to get used to selling my paintings and launching a creative business. It’s uncomfortable at first, often feels unnatural, and you may even feel like a fraud in the process. But after your first few sales or other successes, you will start getting into the swing of things.

Though imposter syndrome may never entirely go away, we learn to build confidence by doing our work and sharing it with the world. The truth is, if you live with the mentality that humans are created as equals, then you will believe that we each have the absolute right to pursue our passion, put ourselves out there, and make a life and career we love. A lot of what holds us back is not a lack of time, money, or materials, but our feelings of unworthiness. Some of my biggest obstacles in the early stages of my career were being scared of silly, made-up problems, such as “what if this is the last good painting I make or sell?”, “what if all this money goes away?” (spoiler alert: with that mentality, it definitely will) and “what if something bad happens as a result of my success?” I even worried about not ‘looking like’ an artist (what does that even mean?).

Of course, I still have my share of anxieties and insecurities when taking risks and putting myself out there, but by continuing to pursue my dreams despite my fears, I’m learning that it’s usually much less scary than I initially imagine. There is more than enough room for all of us creatives to find success and our place in this industry. The only way to fight fear of doubt or disapproval is by staring it straight in the eye and doing it anyway. Share your artwork, submit that application, or write a grant proposal that terrifies you (or at least makes you a little uncomfortable). In so many instances, we’re the only ones who think that an opportunity, show, job, or gallery is ‘out of our league’ when it’s actually not. Show up exactly as you are right now, not when a fancy critic approves of you, when you get signed by a gallery, or when someone buys your work. Show up exactly as you are at this moment in time and be proud of what you do and who you are.

When I first started selling my art, it was priced ridiculously low. It was almost embarrassing how cheap I made my paintings, but I kept going and pushing myself. After each sale, I would slowly increase my prices, feel more like a professional, and upgrade my artist profile. Nobody can do this for you. Take your time and grow at a pace that feels natural, but I urge you to never wait for anyone’s permission or approval. You are the only person responsible for elevating yourself and lifting yourself higher in your life and career. I had to learn this the hard way.

Several years ago on a trip to Miami during Art Basel Week, I had one of my favorite experiences that illustrates the lies of imposter syndrome. I was completely broke. At this point in time, I had already left my day job but was in the process of rebranding the magazine after a business partnership breakup. With about $80 to my name, and a hefty credit card bill to top things off, I packed my bags and headed to the airport.

I was fortunate enough to be nominated by my mentor Bridgette Mayer for an exhibition at Art Miami Fairs. I was honored to be included, but literally had to scrape together every last penny I had in order to travel. The exhibition was sponsored by Diamonds Unleashed and I was invited to come to their cocktail party before the fair. Insecurities about my outfit, a few extra pounds induced by stress, and my lack of money, felt like rocks in the pit of my stomach. But I mustered up the courage to go and used my last few dollars to Uber to the event. Even though I did not feel ready or good enough, I knew that for me to climb out of the current pit that I was in, I had to start showing up for myself and become the person that I wanted to be.

When I arrived at the party, it was even more extravagant than I imagined. I surveyed the scene of this large, oceanview apartment complete with white leather couches, an impressive collection of contemporary art, and trays of champagne floating around the room. I was sure I didn’t belong. Much to my relief, however, the attendees were some of the friendliest people I had ever met. I began chatting with designers, art dealers, artists, and art collectors who were all brought together through this organization for their love of art. Nobody cared that I didn’t wear a designer dress or that I was an emerging artist trying to make things work. They just wanted to see my paintings and hear my story. I will never regret stepping out of my comfort zone to attend this event.

Of course, not every situation in life will go this smoothly, but it’s important to remember that even intimidating individuals, who appear to have everything you don’t, had to start somewhere too and would never have arrived at where they are now if they didn’t face their demons head-on. It’s often our own insecurities that prevent us from putting ourselves into situations that can help us the most. I got so much confidence from the simple fact that I could have a conversation with a famous art dealer that evening.

If you are worried about all the things you are not, or all the skills you don’t yet have, I urge you to take a moment and see yourself for everything you are. Ask yourself, what have you accomplished so far? What are you most proud of? Where do you want to go next? Don’t leave any room for doubts and negativity, especially when it comes to your art. Imagine the person who needs to experience what you create in yourself and don’t deprive them of that joy. Say yes to showing up and sharing your gift and watch the magic unfold in your life.

P.S. If you enjoyed this article, you may like our podcast, Art & Cocktails. You can listen to it for free on iTunes, Spotify and more.

How to Price Your Art: 3 Quick Tips to Start Selling Today!
Photo by LeszekCzerwonka/iStock / Getty Images

Photo by LeszekCzerwonka/iStock / Getty Images

By Ekaterina Popova

One of the questions that I get most frequently from emerging artists is “how do I price my work?”. The confusion surrounding this topic is entirely understandable because there is no exact science or formula for doing so. However, over the past decade, I have collected a few tips that will help you figure out what to charge your collectors and get started with selling your beautiful art.

1. Research your market.

Because there is no exact formula, you will have to do some research. Most importantly, visit a few galleries in person that show work by emerging artists that have a similar amount of experience or are at the same point in their career as you. Take notes on various sizes, mediums and subject matter to see the average prices in the market. If you don’t have access to galleries that you can visit in person at the moment, take some time online and look at websites like Saatchi, Artspace and other similar platforms to see prices for work that relates to your own. The great thing about the internet is that you can type in any topic you need help with and get millions of results. Of course, some art that you come across will be too cheap or too expensive, so average out the prices until you are comfortable with the one you can use for your work.

2. Include the cost of your materials.

It would be almost impossible to calculate exactly how much paint, clay or charcoal you use to produce one piece of work, but keep in mind roughly how much you are spending on supplies to make sure that your prices take these expenses into account. The cost of materials is especially important to consider when you are just starting out and your rates may be relatively low already. Also, don't forget to include the costs of shipping supplies such as bubble wrap and tape, which can add up quickly.

3. Keep track of time.

While I think it’s important to know how much time you are spending in the studio, I wouldn’t necessarily use it as the only pricing point for your work. Some artists spend long, tedious hours on each piece, while others make a ton of work but only select a few final pieces out of the batch. Neither process is wrong or right, just different, and this is why pricing can often feel so complicated. I suggest finding a number that you feel confident presenting to potential clients after researching galleries, calculating materials and keeping your working hours in mind.

If the price of your work is too high, you might resist promoting your work and shy away from selling. If it’s too low, you may feel depleted or even resentful towards your buyer. Test out your happy medium and then commit to it for a year to get yourself established. Remember that in order to be professional and respectful in both your buyer and gallery relationships, stay very consistent with your pricing so that no one feels cheated.

Next, come up with prices for all the types of work that you do. Vary the rates for each size (i.e., larger = more $) and consider selling different mediums at different price points. For example, my 9 x 12 inch watercolors are $300, while my large oil paintings start at $1,300. I highly suggest having a consistent price point for every size and type of work you create. Put all of this information into a document that you can easily reference when discussing with customers or a gallery.

I truly hope that you enjoyed this article and found it useful. For additional pricing tips, I also recommend this article from Saatchi.

For more general art career advice, you can also check out our book ‘The Smartist Guide: Essential Art Career Tips for Emerging Artists’. If you are looking for a place to sell your work, we are currently in the process of launching a new gallery and curated platform called PxP Contemporary. Learn more and find out all of the details about how to submit here.

Happy Selling!

Kat

Are you making the one mistake that is keeping your art from being featured?
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We’ve seen it happen time and again and artists have asked us about this when considering what to submit to our magazine or new gallery, PxP Contemporary. Think that including images from multiple series of works will double or triple your chances of being selected for that juried show, publication or gallery you’ve dreamed of showing with? Well, unfortunately, that’s not likely the case. I know that it’s tempting to want to show off the range of your style and creative ability, but here’s why this isn’t the time to do so.

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  • Demonstrate to the juror that you’ve taken time to really develop an idea, push yourself and stick to it! When you focus on one subject for a while, you get a much better idea of what works and what doesn’t and this helps you build your creative voice. Always keep in mind that submitting your work is like a leaving a first impression. If you have pieces from two bodies of work it can give off the vibe that you don’t quite know who you are yet as an artist or that you’re not confident enough in either series to commit to it fully. I’ll borrow from Kat here and say that you should always be sharing work that excites you! Which paintings, drawings, sculptures, or (insert whatever incredible work you create here) are you most excited about right now? Those are what you should be submitting!

  • Sometimes, it’s purely practical. For publications especially, it is difficult to consider an artist if we wouldn’t be able to put together a consistent spread with their work. Each book, journal, or magazine will have a distinct aesthetic so make it easy for them to know that you are the right fit and to feature your work. The same applies to a gallery, which has to make sure that your work could fill their space and look professional. They are also looking out for their collectors, who come to them specifically for their curatorial expertise. Rather than show them everything in the hopes that they end up buying something (with the risk of overwhelming them), a good dealer will work with the client to help them find something they love from a narrower selection based on their interest and budget. Collectors do often want to see a variety of works, but still within the same theme or style.

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  • If you are equally satisfied with several bodies of work at the moment, I’d still recommend only applying with one or at least one at a time. The biggest issue with this is that you’re leaving the curator to fill in the blanks and assuming that they can or will. How is someone who is not familiar with your work supposed to imagine what the rest of a series looks like when they’ve only seen a few pieces from it? You know that a whole group of works exists that are as great as the ones you’ve submitted, but the curator does not. If they have to go through hundreds or even thousands of artist submissions, they won’t always have the time to go looking through your website or Instagram account to see if you’ve made others like the one or two that they did like.

  • If you’ve recently started a new body of work that you’re wondering if you should start putting out there, make sure it’s ready. Do you have enough works from this series completed and photographed? If not, what’s the rush? There will be more opportunities to apply to. You can keep submitting from an earlier series for now if you want and if there is no restriction from the organization on how recent the work must be or simply allow yourself the time to fully dive into this great new idea.

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Of course, none of this is to say that you have to stick to the same thing forever. No, on the contrary, because it would be hard to have repeat collectors if your work never develops. Your gallery, if you have one, and your collectors simply want to see you continue to grow and will support you along the way!

If you’re making abstract sculptures, but have always wanted to try painting cats, go ahead! One of the greatest things about being an artist is having the freedom to experiment with your creativity. Ultimately, you have to DO YOU. But when it comes time to apply to that next exhibition opportunity, I hope you’ll consider the above and give yourself the best chance of being selected!

As always, both Kat and I are happy to answer any art career questions you have so please feel free to reach out to us: info@createmagazine.com or alicia@createmagazine.com and if you liked this article, check out the Art & Cocktails podcast or our new book The Smartist Guide for more tips.

Cheers and I wish you luck in applying to our current call for Issue 15 curated by Paradigm Gallery! Submit here.

-Alicia


Sell and Market Your Work in 5 Simple Steps

By Ekaterina Popova

When I first committed to my art career, there was a lot of mystery and confusion about how to make sales as an artist. I waited for a gallery to do it for me and truly thought I didn’t have the permission to do it on my own. In fact, I didn’t even think it was possible to sell paintings directly. I was miserable, waiting for some magical opportunity or an art dealer to come knocking on my door.

As you can imagine, no one ever came and I had to figure it out on my own. Through a series of life lessons, investing in additional education and personal development, I discovered that I do not have to wait for anyone to make me qualified to promote my own art. Regardless of whether I have a gallery or not, people may be interested in collecting my work.

As scary as it was putting myself out there, I learned a few simple things about what it takes to make direct sales to collectors online and through exhibitions. Even though I work with a gallery now, I still use these tools to support myself and advance my art career.

When I was just starting out, I truly believed that having an art gallery would eliminate my struggles and somehow would outsource all the sales and marketing for me. I imagined that having a gallery would allow me to paint in a far away cabin in the woods and never have to worry about any other part of my art career. This is far from the truth, but that’s definitely not a bad thing. Over the years of doing it solo, I took back a lot of power and independence when it comes to selling my art, and this has relieved a lot of the pressure of finding a gallery to represent my work. Even if things don’t work out with a gallery, I know I have what it takes to do it on my own.

Working with a gallery has been wonderful so far, but I think part of why this is the case is having the understanding and respect for what they do and how they can potentially elevate my image. I also love to approach galleries as a partnership instead of expecting them to “do something for me” and continue to market and push my work to help sales. This creates a healthy relationship and multiplies the efforts, so both parties win! So don’t be like the past me and think of it as “giving up” if it is your ultimate dream to be represented by a great gallery. You can still work toward that goal and market your work until that happens. Chances are, you are much more likely to get noticed if you are putting yourself out there and sending a message to the world that you are ready to be seen and your art is for sale.

Here are five tips that transformed my mindset around selling and promoting my art. Stop waiting for permission and come up with a plan to inspire new collectors and make some sales:

1. People want to buy art. Help them!

A simple trick that changed everything for me is actually announcing that work is for sale. This is silly, and I write and talk about this all the time, but often when it comes to online marketing you need to nudge your potential collector in the right direction.

Create an album on Facebook that says “available work” and send a newsletter announcing any new collections, limited edition prints or work you recently got back from a show! Be excited and give your audience a way to contact you. Be sure to only post work for sale that you are TRULY proud of. If something in your gut tells you that are not quite there yet, and need to polish up your skills, don’t rush in. Take the time you need to develop a strong body of work and then start selling with confidence.

A caption such as “work available for sale, dm or email for details” or something along those lines makes a huge difference! This is obvious, but if you are represented by a gallery and only sell work through them, direct your buyer towards the gallery and you both win! Remember that people want to buy art and you are not being annoying by giving them that joy. People shop for expensive shoes, purses, and cars. Art brings a lot more meaningful pleasure to a collector than a lot of any other items might. Don’t deprive a potential collector!

2. You are the CEO of your art career. Invest in your business!

Creating a small budget to pay for affordable advertisements on Facebook and Instagram ($10-$50) per post is a fabulous way to push out your work to new collectors that are not in your immediate network. Invest a few dollars each month to grow your audience through ads, reputable Instagram shoutouts, and other creative ways of advertising to get great results. Do a little research on ads and how to find your target audience by doing a quick Google search. Instagram has an “automatic” audience feature to explore as well.

Other ways to invest into your are career include taking additional workshops (both art and business or anything else you want to gain skills in), applying to juried exhibitions and publications, reading educational literature, and of course, using any free resources online. You have to be willing to trust in your dream and invest in your future. This also sends a message to the world that you are serious about your art career. It doesn’t have to cost a lot, but don’t skimp on developing your future!

3. Have a commerce platform ready before you announce your sale.

Whether it’s selling on Etsy, getting paid via PayPal directly, having an e-commerce platform such as Shopify or a page on Squarespace, make sure you set up your shop and test it out for seamless customer experience. If you are shipping originals, your shop structure will be very simple. Just make sure you calculate your shipping cost both domestic and international. Invest into a simple scale (you can get one for under $30 on Amazon), order shipping supplies in bulk to save money and pass on the shipping cost to your buyer, especially if it’s a larger work. I offer free shipping on small works and works on paper. If you are stuck on how to pack artwork, check out this article on Saatchi that I frequently use as a guide for my own shipments. Pricing your art can be challenging, but you just have to get started and stay consistent. Look around at local galleries that show artists at your career level and get an idea for what your type of work is sold for. Just pick a number for each size of work based on the material you create and stick to that price consistently for at least a year.

4. Be great to work with.

Whether you are represented by a gallery or not, be a great person to work with. Offer payment plans to potential clients who may not be able to pay full price right away, be courteous, and respond to messages or questions. I think being a great partner to your gallery can multiply your success, but even if you are on your own, your collector will remember you and will be more likely to add more pieces to their collection in the future. I consider this a win-win, because if they loved buying from you - they will recommend you to a friend and do the marketing for you.

I remember even during my first few art sales, I got a compliment from an older gentleman collector who happened to be a lawyer. He told me how impressed he was with my professionalism, quick replies, and having a seamless sales process. Mind you, this was in 2012 where I was using a simple e-mail invoice and he was sending me a paper check. Do the best you can with what you have and it will pay off!

5. Fix your mindset around marketing and selling.

A lot of us learned to associate selling with sleazy and pushy businessmen portrayed as villains in Hollywood films. This can obviously be the case, but when it comes to your approach to selling and promoting yourself, you can truly make it your own. People will only respond to you if you are true to your work and yourself and develop a way of sharing what you create that works for you and FEELS GOOD. Don’t try to use marketing techniques that feel weird or inauthentic. Share your story and be excited about a work of art that makes you proud. Buying and collecting art is an intimate and personal process. Be confident, follow up, but don’t be offended or take things personally if they don’t go the way you hoped. Like any relationship, you are looking for a good fit, and you want both you and the buyer to be happy with the outcome.

As you continue to grow and develop your craft, your audience and circle of collectors will grow. Sometimes it takes years to get there, and that is ok. I don’t know about you, but I would rather have someone truly LOVE the piece they get from me than be pressured into purchase something they aren’t 100% excited about.

Marketing and sales are amazing as long as you learn ways to make them fun and deeply fulfilling experiences for yourself.

Remember that your priority will always be in the studio. Making art comes first, but it’s a really amazing time to use marketing to take your power back and enjoy the freedom of being an artist without having to ask anyone’s permission or approval.

Cheers!

P.S. if you are just starting out and need some basic art career tips like applying to galleries and marketing on Instagram Alicia Puig and I recently wrote a book called The Smartist Guide which can help!

Giving up Is Not an Option with Ashley Longshore
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Join Ashley Longshore and Kat on this special episode. We talk about the hard stuff: working through financial difficulty, not giving up, trusting and believing in yourself during times of uncertainty, staying in a positive frequency no matter what and working with high end clients. 

Sarah Ashley Longshore is a Louisiana-based painter, gallery owner, and entrepreneur. She is the owner of the Longshore Studio Gallery, located on Magazine Street in New Orleans. Longshore's art focuses on pop culture, Hollywood glamour, and American consumerism and has been compared to the artwork of Andy Warhol.

www.ashleylongshore.com

www.instagram.com/ashleylongshoreart

Podcast Q&A: Newbie marketing, pricing, creating a body of work and more

On this Q&A episode of Art & Cocktails, Kat answers your questions about how to market yourself when you are still developing your style and voice, creating a cohesive body of work, pricing your art, what to focus on in your art career when you are strapped for time, navigating relationships, whether you need a degree to be an artist (spoiler, the answer is no) and more!

Overcoming Creative Burnout 

By Ekaterina Popova

Header image by Lauren Zaknoun

Creative burnout is real. Have you been struggling to start that new painting, or even show up to the studio? Does the thought of making new work drain you and fill you with dread? I recently went through a very intense burnout, which manifested itself as physical illness, emotional breakdown and just a general inability to work. I was out of commission for nearly two weeks.

You see, I have been running on empty for over two years without fully realizing it. From leaving my day job at a call center in 2016 to juggling my painting career and the magazine, I unknowingly replaced breaks, fun and time off with generating new ideas, networking and more to do's. I forgot what it means to be truly inspired, actually have fun and enjoy simple and free pleasures in life whether or not they contribute to my art practice or career. 

It's easy for creatives to feel guilty about taking breaks because we either feel extremely lucky to be able to do it as our job or are dying to make art after working a demanding day job 40+ hours a week. Art can be an escape, but in some cases, it becomes a burden and we need to give ourselves time to heal and replenish our energy and creativity. 

When art, the love of your life, becomes an impossible task, it's time for a little intervention with yourself. Of course, we want to design our lives in a way that would prevent these breakdowns by following a healthy schedule and practicing saying no, but when a burnout happens, here are some steps to help you get back on your feet and back to the flow of life and creativity. 

Slow down to speed up

When I first started experiencing my setback, I shared the situation with my mentor, Bridgette Mayer, who suggested scheduling time off, even for fun activities. Make your time off just as important as your assignments and projects. Try to incorporate a day a week where you indulge in guilt-free activities such as reading, spending time with loved ones or making art just for you (if you are up for it of course). 

Check your engine

Sometimes we forget that we are living, breathing humans and not machines pumping out ideas, art and inspiration. Even if you exercise and eat well, stress and fatigue may have devastating effects on your overall health. When I was going through my burnout, I felt like I had the flu and could not stop sleeping, even though my medical report was flawless. Make sure you are conscious of your breathing, are sleeping enough and taking the time to laugh and enjoy your day. 

On a recent episode of our podcast Art & Cocktails, I interviewed one of my favorite painters Andrew Salgado, an incredible and prolific figurative artist. Andrew shared that he takes a complete break after each exhibition and travels. Coming from such a successful figure, this made me realize how my nonstop schedule is probably hindering my growth in some ways. 

We simply cannot expect to make good art if we continue to abuse our body and mind. I am guilty of this and am learning to listen when enough is enough, no matter what is expected of me that day. 

Release the pressure

The good news is, if we take care of ourselves and temporarily stop making art, no-one is going to be severely affected. I remember, back when I worked at Macy's, my manager used to tell me on a particularly bad sales day "we are not saving lives, it's just lipstick.", and that little saying stuck with me. No matter what's going on, your health and mental well being are way more important than artwork. Plus your gallery and collector need you just as much as you need them and would totally understand if you needed an extra day, week or month (only you know how much time you need). If you are generally a responsible, reliable and pleasant person to work with, people will understand and will give you grace. Release the fear and take the time that you need to be the best artist and person you can be.

Prioritize

Of course, sometimes we have projects and deadlines that determine the course of our career or if we will be able to pay for our bills that month. Highlight the immediate tasks at hand and complete them as well as you can and practice saying no to anything that comes after. If you have things due in the future but are not pressing at the moment, use this time to recover fully. Don't look at, think about or talk about upcoming deadlines that aren't an emergency and focus on your health as much as possible. If you need help saying no, here is a great resource by Marie Forleo to help you get started, another great book I read on this subject is Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown.


Say it out loud

Sometimes, we get stuck in our own head and need to someone to give us permission to take the break we desperately need. Calling a friend or someone you trust and expressing your condition can help you view yourself from a third party perspective and give you compassion. If you don't have someone to call, here is your permission slip. You are worthy of feeling your best, no matter how much time you need. 

When you are ready to start creating again, start slow and shorten your workday from what you are used to, in order to not fall back into the trap of overwhelming. Work on multiple projects at a time in bite-size pieces. Set a timer and take a five-minute break for every 30 you work. Make sure to step outside once in a while and breathe. 

Our art is about expressing our true selves, and if we are completely worn out it is difficult to share our passion with others. After my recent experience, I want to still be painting and feeling great when I am in my 80's, therefore I will treat my life and career as a marathon and not a sprint.

Give yourself permission to rest. I promise you and your work will be better for it. I can't wait to see what you create when you come out on the other side!

Share your thoughts below or send us an email at info@createmagazine.com

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Going The Extra Mile: Career Decisions, Networking and Standing Out From The Crowd With Alicia Puig
Alicia reading  Create! Magazine  in Amsterdam

Alicia reading Create! Magazine in Amsterdam

Alicia Puig is an art historian who has worked for several notable galleries, museums, and nonprofit organizations throughout her career and who is very experienced in marketing for the arts and exhibition development. She was a practicing artist for many years, but after starting her first gallery job managing a small exhibition space for student art, she soon realized that she loved helping young artists put together what was often their first professional quality solo show more than creating her own work. Since then, she has continued to seek out new opportunities for creative professionals like herself and has connected many artists to their next exhibitions, published features, or sales.

On this episode, Alicia Puig shares how she figured out her unique career path in the art world and what helped her make the difficult decision about which one of her passions to pursue.

Alicia has been able to carve out a place for herself in the arts by practicing resilience and handling rejection with grace. She shares tips on how to stick out from the crowd and outsmart your competition when looking for opportunities. This episode also offers effective networking strategies and offers tips for artists on working with galleries.

If you are at a crossroads in your career or are excited about making it as a gallerist, curator or work with major art institutions, this one is for you!

Painting on a photograph by Alicia Puig (discussed in this episode)

Painting on a photograph by Alicia Puig (discussed in this episode)

Paintings Alicia Puig completed during her undergrad at Kutztown University

New Podcast: Instagram For Artists Part I

This month I celebrated new milestones on my Instagram accounts and wanted to share some simple, easy tips that helped me get my personal account to 20k and the magazine's account to 60k.

I use instagram to network, share my work with the world and even connect with new collectors! I want to share what has been working for me to help you do the same.

On this episode, I cover the basics on what to post, how to promote and even sell artwork. Perfect for beginners. 

-Kat



How to Host a Studio Sale Online 

A few years ago, I started selling my work online. It was a very slow and natural progression from getting a friend of a friend to buy a piece to eventually meeting new collectors from across the globe. I learned a ton of lessons from my experiences and wanted to share them with you. 

Hosting a sale a few times per year is a great way to make room in your studio and fund your next project or exhibition. Over the years, this strategy became an integral part of my artist business plan and introduced me to many incredible art lovers. So, whether you have an overflow of inventory, are looking to make some money, or want to find new collectors, these tips on hosting an online studio sale will help you with all the above. I will be using these techniques and strategies right along with you. Let’s plan for a successful season of selling our art!

Photo courtesy of  Marta Spendowska

Photo courtesy of Marta Spendowska

Here are three important elements you need to help make your sale a success. 

1. Organize your inventory. 

This is the tedious and mundane part, but it will help you make the rest of the process very simple. 

1. Select every piece of art that you want to sell and is available to pack and ship right away. Make sure all the artwork that you feature is something you are proud of and would want someone to have in their home. Don’t try to dump your entire inventory, because the client will know if it’s not your best work. Use a special series, pieces that recently became available, or a collection you made specifically for the sale. You can curate this experience in any way you choose, but make it meaningful and unique.

Photo courtesy of  Danielle Krysa

Photo courtesy of Danielle Krysa

2. Photograph each piece, if you haven’t already, and organize the files with labels that you will know how to find. Take beautiful, crystal clear images that show your work in its best light. More quick tips on photographing your work here.

3. Keep the files in a place you can remember and have a document with titles, sizes, media, and prices in the same folder for easy reference. Label your work in a consistent way within that folder. For example: (yourname_paintingtitle_dimensions_price.jpeg ). 

I keep images and information of my art on Dropbox because even if I don’t have my computer with me, I can still have access to the best quality files in case I need them. 

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2. Plan your shop. 

There are a ton of free and affordable web tools that make it super easy for artists to sell online. When I first started doing this, I would create an album on Facebook and mark items off as they sold. At one point, I used a simple PDF with available works that I e-mailed interested patrons. These days, I use the shop feature on my Squarespace hosted site and send a “secret” link to those who are interested. A lot of web hosting services offer free or affordable options for customers to checkout using PayPal or Stripe. You can also create a simple link with a piece if you are selling your work on a one to one basis. paypal.me

Another option is to use an online gallery like Saatchi to sell work for you. They take a small commission fee, so you would have to calculate your prices accordingly.

Once you decide on your option, upload your work and details, and set up how you want to get paid. It’s up to you if you want to keep the shop and prices private, or share with everyone. Here is great article by Saatchi that may help you price your work. https://canvas.saatchiart.com/art/how-to-price-your-artwork

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3. Spread the word. 

Chances are you probably already have a community you created online on Facebook, Instagram or your e-mail list. It doesn’t matter how big your following is, as long as you have a genuine connection with at least a few people. Make a simple announcement that lets your audience know that you are excited and your work is on sale. Invite others to share the news with their community. Sometimes people need to be reminded that they can own the beautiful paintings they have been looking at for months on your profile!

Photo courtesy of  Sticks and Ink

Photo courtesy of Sticks and Ink

I remember feeling so nervous when I launched my first sale online. It only featured a few pieces, but I had the worst imposter syndrome and doubt just flooded my mind. Thoughts like “What if no-one buys anything?”, “Am I charging too high or too low?”, and so on would paralyze me. I finally committed to putting myself out there and e-mailed a few people I had on my Mailchimp list.

For a whole day or so I did not hear from anyone, which then inspired me to make an announcement on my Facebook page and Instagram. I paid $10 to run a little “boosted post” on Facebook to broaden my reach. A few days later I started getting messages and made my first big sale. Whenever I feel doubt again, I think back to the amazing feeling I had when I sold a big painting to a stranger across the country. I was on cloud nine for weeks!

Photo Courtesy of  Zoë Pawlak

Photo Courtesy of Zoë Pawlak

If it’s your first time putting your art out there, don’t be scared! The worst that can happen is nothing at all or everyone will want to buy your work and you will have an empty studio and a full wallet. 

Remember to be confident about your art and accomplishments. Think back to any exhibitions, publications or any other accolades you received so far. If you are a newbie, think about a time that someone complimented your work and how proud it made you feel.

P.S. Once you make the sale, make sure you pack it like a pro. Learn how here: https://www.saatchiart.com/packaging

Check back and let me know if any of these tips worked for you at info@create-magazine.com

The Do’s and Don’ts of Applying to Galleries

One of the quintessential markers of an artist’s success is securing a gallery to represent their work. The application process can be daunting, whether you have already sent out hundreds of emails or are mustering up the courage to reach out to your first gallery. While it does take time and a little bit of research, it doesn’t have to be so overwhelming. Based on insider knowledge from working for galleries, art fairs, museums and auction houses and my own previous experiences approaching this as an artist, I’ve put together my thoughts on what to have prepared before you submit, how to find the right fit for your work and the best do’s and don’ts for applying to galleries.

First, if you haven’t read Kat’s post “5 Things Keeping Your Art from Being Featured”, please pause right here and check it out first! A lot of the rules she mentions relate to this topic as well.

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1. Adding to her tips about your artist website – DO choose a simple, memorable domain name and email address. You’d be surprised at how many people send applications with websites or personal emails that are not related to their art! You want your first impression to make you look like a professional, practicing studio artist.

A few good options are [yourname].com, [yourname]art.com or [yourname]artist.com. If you have a more common name you can play around with adding your middle name, initial, or using a shortened version of your first name like Kat did! https://www.katerinapopova.com/

2. DON’T jump the gun and submit before you’re ready. Have a consistent body of work that includes at least 15-20 pieces viewable on your site. They don’t all have to be one medium, but should demonstrate that you’ve put effort into developing an idea. This allows a prospective gallery to imagine what a full solo show of yours would look like. If you only send five images or don’t have many posted on your website, a dealer might think that you don’t have enough work to fill a gallery.

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3. DO compare galleries. In the best-case scenario, you would visit galleries and talk to the owner, director or manager in person beforehand to get a feel for whom you would be working with. Just like if you’re job searching, you want the relationship with your gallery to be mutually beneficial. If you don’t like the space or didn’t connect with the staff, you’ll be glad you didn’t spend the effort applying.

4. DO your research if you can’t go to the galleries to find the best match. Find out who they already represent. Visualize a group show with all of these artists and honestly answer the question: Does my work fit the aesthetic? Read their résumés to see where they studied and have exhibited (and how they are formatted!). Do you have similar accomplishments?

If you're a younger artist, try looking for galleries with a smaller project space where they are often more willing to show emerging or experimental work. This could be an easier way to get your foot in the door.

Finally, if you are applying to galleries outside of your local area, always consider how much you are able to spend to ship your work to them. That is usually a cost that you will have to incur and it can get expensive very quickly, even if some dealers are willing to split the shipping fees 50/50.

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5. DO look closely at a gallery’s website and social media channels. A quality gallery will maintain their online presence using the same standards that they expect of yours: modern, clean and up-to-date. You might also want to note if a gallery regularly produces a catalog for their artists’ exhibitions, if they are private versus open to the public and which art fairs they attend, if any. If these things are important to you, don’t lose time drafting applications to galleries that don’t meet your requirements.

6. Along a similar vein, DON’T submit an unsolicited application if a gallery’s website explicitly says that they are not currently looking for artists. I worked at a gallery where we noted that we were not actively seeking applications and we were still contacted by multiple artists each week! Please read their website thoroughly to avoid making this mistake.

Think about it from another perspective – if you were an artist already represented by this gallery and they continued to take on more people, you would likely have less opportunity to show and they would focus less effort on selling your work specifically. Though I would personally avoid applying to galleries that aren’t looking altogether, if it otherwise seems like the perfect fit for your work, my best advice is to see if you can get a face-to-face meeting with the director.

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7. Please DON’T just show up to a gallery with your portfolio. Again, I’ve worked at galleries where this happened weekly and it is not the right way to start the conversation. If you arrive unannounced, you are catching the staff off guard and there is no guarantee that someone will be available to meet with you. Similarly, exhibition openings and the first few days of an art fair are tough times for long conversations with a dealer because they will be focused on their clients and closing sales. However, if you notice a lull when you are there, certainly take the chance to meet them or ask them for an appointment at a more convenient time. This way, when you follow up via email you can say that you’ve already met – mention when and where so they remember.

8. DO find other opportunities to introduce yourself. Besides showing up to gallery openings, attend art events in your community and you are likely to meet the people you are looking to work with organically. Practice speaking to people about your work confidently, like an elevator pitch, and ideally be able to do one that is short (one minute) and one that is a little longer (five minutes) in case you have the time for a more in-depth conversation. Pinpoint what are the most exciting or unique things about your work and you as an artist and use those to convince a gallerist to want to represent you.

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9. DO read their application instructions carefully, triple check your materials, and have a friend look for typos! If they do not list specific instructions, send a brief email stating your interest in the gallery and attach your resume, images as a zip file and your artist statement (check out our article with tips on writing one). For large files, you can also use programs like Dropbox and WeTransfer, but be wary of having to send more than one email. Ideally, you want to send a complete application in one message. Look on the gallery information page of their website to find the name and email of the owner or director so you can address it directly to him or her.

Your message could read something like this:

Dear [Gallery Owner],

I am writing in reference to the call for artists listed on your website [OR to submit my work to be considered for representation]. My current body of work [describe in one or two sentences]. I have exhibited most recently at [name notable exhibitions, preferably solo or two-person] and am part of the permanent collection of [list any]. [Also mention relevant awards, recent press, residencies or other gallery affiliations].  

Please find attached my artist statement and résumé, as well as a selection of my work. Additional pieces can be viewed on my website: [list website here]. If you have any further questions, feel free to contact me at [list email, phone or both]. Thank you for your time and I look forward to hearing from you shortly.

This example is more formal, but it gives you an idea of what you can say to keep it simple and direct. 

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10. DON’T get frustrated if your application goes unanswered. Hopefully, a gallery will at least do you the courtesy of acknowledging your application, but they often do not. My general rule is that once I apply to something I “forget” about it rather than worry or obsessively check my email. If I hear back, hooray! – if not, oh well. There will always be more to apply to. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t follow up. It is appropriate to send a message about a week or two after the initial one to ask if your application was received or if it is being reviewed. If they still don’t respond, however, then it’s time to move on.

11. DO consider alternative models like co-op galleries. Depending on where you are in your career, it might be worth it for you to exchange a few sitting hours per month for the opportunity to show. Always read their agreements carefully to decide if the exhibition potential outweighs the membership fees and/or working requirements.

Speaking of alternatives to the traditional gallery – connecting with independent curators, art advisors and interior designers can help broaden your client base as well. While most galleries sell to private individuals or people purchasing on behalf of an institution, a curator or designer might be looking for art to place in a corporate office, hotel lobby, restaurant or department store, and some are tasked with finding artists for large-scale mural projects. But most importantly, never underestimate the power of building your own personal brand! With a strong website and social media presence, you can start to make sales on your own.

12. Lastly, DON’T let the fear of rejection hold you back. When I was still in art school, I remember finding a gallery focused on emerging artists. I compared myself to who they were already showing and thought that I fit the bill, but I was too scared and talked myself out of submitting an application for a whole YEAR! Luckily, once I finally bit the bullet and applied, I heard back shortly after and was asked to bring in a few pieces for a final review. At my meeting, the gallery director decided to take all of them and I signed a contract on the spot. Sadly, the gallery eventually closed, but at the time despite being overjoyed at the positive outcome, I was a little disappointed in myself for having given into my self-doubt for so long. Don’t let that be you.

Everyone at Create! is cheering for you! So, go, apply to amazing galleries and get represented. Tell us about it when you do ;) 

Stress Free Tips For Writing Your Artist Statement

Does the thought of writing your artist statement make you wake up in cold sweat at 4 am? You’re not alone. I am currently writing an updated statement for a solo exhibition, and I feel your pain. After receiving tons of messages asking me to give me insight into crafting this important part of your portfolio, I decided to give you a few easy hacks to make this a simple process. 

You don’t have to be a great writer to have a clean, easy-to-understand description of what your work is about. We often overthink what an artist statement actually is. It should be a genuine, honest snapshot of what you care about and how you do what you do. It doesn’t have to be long; a paragraph or two is usually enough. 

Look, we DO need to have professional, easy to read statements, but at the end of the day, if you’re an artist, you probably don’t spend the majority of your life working on becoming a best-selling author. In general, people will know this and will not expect an award-winning essay. They just want to learn more about what you do!

Ask yourself this: what do you want your viewer to know about you, your process and work that is not immediately evident just by looking at it? We all want our work to speak for itself, but each person’s perception is completely different based on their life experience, culture and interests. They may fall in love with your art even more once they get the right information.

Take a deep breath, grab a cup of tea or a glass of wine, and try these easy tips that will take the pain out of the process. 

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Remember this:

“An artist statement is a concise arrangement of words that acts as a bridge to connect your audience to your art.”
— Vicki Krohn Amorose
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Here are five stress-free steps to help you get started:

1. Brain dump.

Make a list of things that you are thinking about when painting, sculpting, photographing, etc. Are you looking for a specific mood when creating? Do you like telling stories? Ask yourself these questions and write down your unfiltered answers on a piece of paper. If you are looking for more questions, Vicki Krohn Amorous, author of Art Write, offers a few great ones in her book.

Question Examples

Why did I make this?

What do I believe in?

How did I make this? (Materials, Location, Etc.)

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2. Read. Read. Read.

It’s a great exercise to check out what everyone else is doing. Start by visiting the websites of artists you admire and see how they approach this part of their studio practice.

Get a sense of how diverse, vast and unlimited your possibilities are! You don’t have to sound like a robot, and at the same time you don’t need to reinvent to wheel. Be clear and straightforward and your audience will respond. 

Invest in art publications to develop your vocabulary. Take a few moments each week to read the art section of The New York Times, Art News, Frieze or any other material that inspires you.

(This goes without saying, but please, never copy or try to replicate anyone’s work in art or writing. Take cues, but never steal!)

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3. Jot down thoughts throughout your day. 

If you are walking to grab a cup of coffee in your favorite neighborhood and suddenly you get a random idea, write it down! Sometimes hearing inspiring song lyrics or listening to a podcast will give you the words and phrases you need to describe your work. Inspiration is everywhere!

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4. Put it all together.

When you are ready, sit down and write your first draft. It may feel pretty rough at first. Put it away for a bit and come back to it with fresh eyes. Reading your writing out loud is a big help. You can catch mistakes and odd sentence structure more easily when you hear it spoken out loud. Repeat this two or three times and then have someone else read it for typos and grammar mistakes. 

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5. When you are done, ask yourself the following:

Does this make sense to me?

Would someone with no knowledge of art understand this?

Is it true?

Does it reflect what I want the viewer to know about my work and process?

P.S. If you still feel uncomfortable with your writing, there are tons of affordable options to have a professional edit it. A friend is usually happy to help!

You can also connect with our editor, Amanda, here: ashrawder@gmail.com.

If you want someone to help you write, artist and writer Michele Kishita offers this service at www.michelekishitawriting.com

If any of these tips worked for you, let us know and share them with a friend! If you have another topic you want covered, email your ideas to info@create-magazine.com

5 Things Keeping Your Art from Being Featured

If you are anything like me, you probably apply to hundreds of opportunities each month, crossing your fingers, hoping to get selected for that dream exhibition in New York or to appear on the glossy pages of your favorite art magazine. But what if there was one thing preventing your artwork from being chosen for that dream exhibition or publication?

Over the past six years I have worked with curators, galleries, and artists and learned a few very simple things that will increase your success rate.

As an editor, I see hundreds of art submissions each week that I would publish in a heartbeat, but there is always something that stops me… I decided to compile a list of ways to avoid the most common mistakes that deter curators, publishers, and bloggers from featuring your work.

So, if you are having trouble getting your work noticed, fear not! Use these tips and watch those acceptance letters multiply. 

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1. Use great photography. No, it doesn’t have to be expensive.

This is the easiest one to fix! We spend so much time, energy and resources making our work that it’s a disservice to have less than perfect images of it. Nothing is more frustrating to a publisher or curator than seeing an incredible work of art captured with poor photography. They may love your piece, but can’t publish or exhibit it because of this issue. 

Good news! Here are a few easy solutions:

Get a professional’s help. Hire or ask if you can trade a product you make or a service you offer with a photographer friend to get the best images of your work. Reach out to any alumni groups if you went to college to see if your colleagues are offering a good price first. 

Invest in a camera and take the photos yourself. If you are unfamiliar with photography, there may be a learning curve. If you are eager to DIY, there are plenty of videos and resources to get you started for free online. 

Use your smartphone. Several artists that Create! Magazine previously published use their phones to take amazing photos of their work. If you decide to do this, make sure you set your setting on HDR and use daylight or a daylight lamp to get the best result. Always crop your photo when finished, so that the background and any distractions are removed. If your work requires installation views and detail shots, make sure they are clean and organized. Adjust the lighting to reflect the image as close to reality as possible. 

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2. Include basic information.

I can’t tell you how many times an artist simply sent an image with no description, contact information or link to her site! There were more times than I can count that I desperately wanted to feature the piece but had no way of reaching the person. Don’t let this be you! Always use a polite greeting, brief introduction and a place where the person you are writing can reach you if they need more details. Make it simple for the person to increase your chances of success. 

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3. Follow the Rules. 

Follow basic instructions. When filling out hundreds of applications the temptation to be lazy and recycle the same submission package is sometimes too great to resist. Don’t give in! If the organization asks for the images to be labeled a certain way, do it! Make it super easy for the gallery to feature your work. We are all busy, and can appreciate when someone respects our time. A lot of systems being used by companies today require a specific labeling method or file format. So, if they ask for a jpeg, use a jpeg. 

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4. Be part of the community. 

Especially when it comes to local organizations and events, being a familiar face is always a good idea. I even found that simple things like commenting on Instagram, reaching out to someone you admire for coffee (when it’s appropriate) or showing up to art openings increases opportunities for YOU to be involved in the future. The best practice is to do this with people and organizations you genuinely enjoy, instead of trying to get something out of it. By nourishing these relationships online or in person, you are inevitably planting the seeds to be considered for future opportunities. 

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5. Celebrate your achievements (not in a way that you think).

This is going to sound obvious, but be proud of what you have done up to this point. This means having a place online where curators and patrons can see what you’re all about. Have a clean website. There are tons of affordable and beautiful options including Squarespace, Wix, Weebly, and more are available on the market today. If you can’t afford a website at this moment, simply have a Tumblr page or its equivalent that includes the following vital content:

  • Your portfolio

  • Your written bio

  • Your artist statement

  • Your exhibitions, awards and press features

  • Contact info

That’s it! 

I hope these simple tips will help you get more yeses and propel your art career forward! If you found this article helpful or know someone who may benefit from it, please feel free to share, tweet and comment below.

If you have a topic or question your would like us to cover, feel free to send suggestions to info@create-magazine.com. 

Interview: Megan Elizabeth

I grew up in Maryland, just outside of DC, enjoying childhood summers swimming in lakes and at the beach and always exploring outdoors. My elegant, feminine and often abstract artwork is inspired by travels all over the world.  I have lived abroad in Spain and traveled much of Europe and the Caribbean, collecting impressions and memories from each place.  Currently, I reside in Brooklyn NYC with my family and am the leader of the Tuesdays Together NYC chapter, and serve as the Regional Director of the Northeast for Honeybook.  

www.artbymegan.com

When did you first know you wanted to be an artist?

I grew up doodling, coloring, imagining, dreaming, daydreaming and always wanting to make art.  The making of the art was never a decision I made, it is something that has naturally just happened throughout my life.  I can't stop! 

When I am happy, I make art.  When I am sad, I make art to clear my mind.  When I am inspired, I think of making art.  It's always just waiting in the back of my mind for a chance to come to fruition. 

Tell us about your process and inspiration. How does each painting come to life?

I often tell people that my mind is like a camera. I see beautiful things (sunrises, sunsets, florals, and fleeting moments) and those images become stored in my brain for a later time. Then, usually I have a dream about a painting and then the next day (ideally) I paint it!  It's a very crazy process, but traveling and seeing new things definitely, accelerates the creative process for me.  

We are really inspired by your business sense in the arts. Tell us a little bit about how you got started selling paintings and collaborating with others. 

I began selling my art at pop-up shops, small local shops, and online with an Etsy shop.  I soon realized that in order to make my business effective, I was going to have to take it to the next level by taking it really seriously and dedicating much more time to it.  

I was super lucky, thanks to a shift in our lives and a new job for my husband, to get to start my business full-time 2 years ago.  When I started, I went 100 mph in the direction of my dream, because I had waited so long for the timing to be right. I was so excited (and still am) to wake up every day and follow my passion. 

One of my fundamental business practices is to meet people in real life.  I believe that as a business owner, you can leverage the power of online communication to a point, but that the REAL interactions still have to be happening over coffee, drinks, or, ideally, bagels.  Instagram has really helped my business grow, but I love even more when those "IG friends" become REAL friends! 

My role as the leader of a group of creatives called TuesdaysTogether (as part of The Rising Tide Society) and as a Creative Strategist for the Community Team at a start-up in San Francisco called Honeybook has been so pivotal in learning my business savvy. I love giving back to my creative community by sharing ideas, leading meetings each month, and making sure that all creatives feel welcome and able to ask others for help. I also love the challenge of brainstorming and having a unique perspective as I help contribute to helping a start-up company grow and serve new audiences. I firmly that believe if we all help one another when we can, that the creative economy can succeed more.  

I am the kind of person that learns best by doing.  I need the "trial-by-fire" in order to succeed. I am ok with mistakes the older I get and I appreciate the life lessons in each chapter of life.  

What are some of the biggest fears and challenges that you overcame as a creative?

Fear of failure, at first. I wanted my business to work so badly and I was very fearful of it failing and being embarrassed or having to reinvent myself AGAIN.  

Fear of success, next. I was worried that once it started working, I wouldn't be able to sustain my business as it grows or that I would burn out or fall out of love with it. (Note: I won't ever fall out of love, but I DID get an AMAZING intern thanks to a feature on Create Magazine!) 

Currently, not feeling so fearful. I'm learning to re-channel that energy into gratitude. It's a much more productive thing for me to "worry about". I secretly love worrying. :) 

How do you like to unwind? Tell us about your favorite things to do when you are not painting. 

TRAVEL.  If I could just be a travel blogger on the side, my business would really thrive.  (not kidding)

Also, I love spending time with my family, taking walks in the park, pretending to be a tourist in NYC, getting lost and discovering new places on accident, eating delicious new foods, doing yoga, reading books. 

I LOVE reading.  I am currently reading like 4 books at the same time.  

What advice would you give other creatives looking to take their career to the next level? 

Step 1. Tell yourself that you are going to do it, even when it isn't glamorous, even when it's really hard. Resign to not giving up. 

Step 2. Ask for help. Make creative friends and trust them.  

Step 3. Give back. Give to others. Help others grow. In turn, you will grow. 

How do you feel about your creative community? Do you like to attend art openings or workshops?

As a total extrovert, I thrive on human interaction and new experiences. I LOVE meeting new people. I love discussing new ideas with others and challenging my brain to think from new perspectives.  I attend meetings, meet-ups, art shows, and any other event that I can, but not with the motive of getting people to buy my art. I think you genuinely have to love what you do in the research capacity, I love learning. And when I learn, my business thrives indirectly. I almost always attend events and forget to give out my business cards, and then I return home and my husband teases me for being such a people person that I forget to be a business person.