Posts tagged Collage
Hollie Chastain
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Hollie Chastain is an artist living and working in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Following studies in both fine art and business she spent several years in marketing and graphic design before returning to the studio to launch a career as an artist and illustrator. Hollie uses mainly paper, mixing found images with modern colors and compositions to create work full of originality and narrative. Influenced by her love for found ephemera, she has become best known for her works created on the covers from vintage, tossed-aside books letting the scribbles, stamps and history found there contribute to the composition. She works as both a gallery artist and illustrator.

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Soojin Choi
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Collage is very similar to poetry. Images are used like words of a poem that transcend their original usage and form creative, imaginative, but not universal mediums of interpretation. Poets sculpt words and structure them into a poem. I choose images and arrange them into artwork. Where and how images get placed is the way to create the relationship that entails unique expressions.

Space can be used as a setting and also as an object by utilizing the interaction of images within the composition on both two and three-dimensions of my sculptures. Space consists of two-dimensional surface, three-dimensional structure, and negative spaces. In my artwork, there is perspective on surfaces, there are flat images on voluptuous structures, and silhouettes exist between the surfaces and structures. Spatial recognitions are made when they multiply and coexist within relationships of each other. By repeatedly layering flat and structural components I bring images and enumerate them into existence. I assemble space and parade them into a poem in the name of art.

Soojin Choi

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Jackie Leishman
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Leishman grew up in Georgia, moving to the Los Angeles area after completing her Masters of Fine Arts degree from the Academy of Art in San Francisco. Originally trained as a photographer, she now works in collage.  Her work investigates the interrelationship between painting, drawing, and collage. 

 She has shown her work nationally, won awards, and taught photography and fine art at universities in Utah and California. She has participated in art residencies at The Anderson Center in Red Wing, MN and PressWorks in Claremont, CA. She was most recently commissioned by Emily Henderson Designs, and was exhibited in the Downtown LA Arts District, had a solo show in Utah, “If We Ever Wake At All”, and continues to participate in the ever-evolving art collaboration, “The Fourth Artist.” 

Statement

The world is collage to me. What happens at the edges and among the layers, where two different materials or ideas meet — that’s where I’m drawn. I have bins and bins of paper and scraps in my studio. It is important to my process that I not use virgin working materials but rather fragments of older work and found materials. Something from something. Beauty from ashes. It’s also important for me to show the sometimes-raw joints, the roughness of their coming together, to be candid about the process of layering and to leave the hand of the artist apparent. 

The push and pull between two ideas intrigues me most: the animating tensions between destruction and creation, expansion and contraction, and explosion and implosion. These ideas are embodied in the wilderness. The only constant in the wild is that it will change, that an element can and will be both violent and passive, opposites held in a balance. In a world that is increasingly contentious, the need to feel peace within the chaos becomes more desperate. By drawing, painting and collaging, I seek to find an equivalent to the peace found in wild places. 

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Aly Morgan
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Led purely by a natural sense of curiosity, Aly Morgan follows each spark of inspiration until it leads to a new discovery - either about herself, the world or her place within it. Although she prefers to work with acrylic paint and newsprint, inspiration has led her to try many unconventional materials in the journey of finding her creative voice. Her early works were heavily influenced by her days as a jewelry designer and were created using items such as wire, fine silver and found objects. Now specializing in hand painted and found paper collage, she works intuitively to create compelling combinations of shapes and color to convey stories of self-discovery. As a self-taught artist, she has explored expressing her ideas for many years using different mediums but has focused the last 6 months on unraveling her own personal definition of art. In doing so, she has created a large body of work that reflects not only her current inspirations but also explores themes such as womanhood, connection, and language. Her most recent series, Native Tongue, explores the relationship between an artist and what inspires them as well as celebrates the translation of that inspiration into one’s work. By using her literal inspirations to create abstract characters, she is continually building a language in which the forms are all at once familiar yet foreign, while challenging the viewer to seek their own interpretation.

Statement

Inspiration is everything to me. It is what motivates me, leads my creative process and ultimately, what nourishes my soul. A concept that is the cornerstone in creating my personal work is what I call “following the golden thread”. To me, it simply means following a spark of inspiration to see where it leads.

Having lived most of my life believing that art was simply paintings that hung in museums, it wasn’t until I was introduced to mixed-media art 12 years ago, that I learned differently. Once I discovered that art was not just for long ago masters to create, I was compelled to seek my own definition of what art could be.

I am fascinated by color and what it can convey. I am continuously exploring ways to combine color and shape in order to translate a thought or feeling into a recognizable form. While I continue to explore various techniques, I am most drawn to creating my own collage material using acrylic paint and newsprint. Although they are humble materials, they allow me to create endless combinations of colors and shapes.

I am most inspired by finding beauty in unexpected places, so while my work is unapologetically feminine in color and themes, it is also heavily influenced by my love of long forgotten and neglected objects. I feel my most compelling pieces are ones that marry color with organic texture and invite the viewer to seek their own interpretation.


Madeline Zappala

Madeline Zappala is a Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist driven towards creating conceptual archives of our digital experiences. She received her MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts/Tufts University after studying American Culture at Vassar College. Her work is largely informed by her background in photography and her interest in the intersection of collective cultural consciousness, technology and identity. Her recent projects rely on generative and conceptual writing methods to extract alternate narratives hidden in everyday digital interactions.

Brooke Sauer

Regardless of what medium I employ, my work celebrates my love and awe of nature. In my newest series of cyanotypes I combine my background in painting with my love of photography and botany as I explore a sense of place and observe how native and non native species of flora and fauna in various environments co-exist with one another. In a large collection of collages entitled, In Search of Treasure, I explore our human relationship to landscape using mineral specimens as terrain to be investigated, traversed, enjoyed, and to inspire feelings of awe through surrealist moments that encourage the viewer to derive their own narrative, and place themselves in the tiny landscape that they see before them.

I have exhibited with spaces such as LA Louver, the UCLA Hammer museum, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, and the Los Angeles Freewaves Festival. I have been published in print and online in a variety of publications. Previously working as part of the collaborative duo, B&T, for over a decade, I have returned to my solo practice in painting, printmaking, photography, and collage. Thank you for taking the time to view my work.

www.brookesauer.com

Love in a Parallel Universe: Interview with Madelaine Buttini

Madelaine Buttini (Madbutt) is a visual artist from Brisbane, Australia currently exploring hand cut and digital collage using vintage and modern materials. In this episode, Maddie shares a beautiful, personal account of her life and creative journey. Enjoy our juicy chat about romance, changing careers, and following your instincts to find your artistic voice. We also discuss her current work and creative process behind her dreamy collages.

Bio

Madelaine Buttini (Madbutt) is a visual artist from Brisbane, Australia currently exploring hand cut and digital collage using vintage and modern materials. Madelaine aspires to bring a moment of happiness and hope from her artwork, especially for those who feel lost and alone in our busy and sometimes overwhelming society. Her work reflects on the challenges she has faced as a friend, girlfriend, and feminist.

Over the past year, Madelaine has been busy exhibiting in New York, London, and throughout the East Coast of Australia. In 2017, Madelaine's work was featured in VICE Magazine and vastly online after Lana Del Rey shared one of her first public works "Brigitte" to promote her single, "Love". Since then her collage artworks are within inspiration sections of fashion literature, book covers, and albums. She is a contributing artist for the Brooklyn based magazine, The Dispatch, run by Folk Rebellion. She has worked with clients such as Goop, The BBC, Calfia Farms, and Roland Mouret.  

As an artist Madelaine aspires to bring attention to important issues that affect a variety of communities. As someone who struggles with anxiety and depression, she aims to bring awareness about mental health issues by discussing her own struggles on social media [AS1] with her artwork. In June 2018, she discussed the issue of consent and female circumcision (FGM) at her first Sydney group exhibition. She has donated works to charity art auctions for Friends With Dignity, Beyond Blue, and The Heliotrope Foundation to help raise funds for those in need. 

Maddie's details: 

www.madbutt.com.au

www.instagram.com/madbutt

Anthony Lister's details:

www.instagram.com/anthonylister

Faust's details:

http://www.faustnewyork.com

 https://www.instagram.com/faustnewyork

Scottie Marsh's details:

http://scottmarsh.com.au/ https://www.instagram.com/scottie.marsh/

Clare Celeste Börsch

Clare Celeste Börsch has been assimilating to different cultures and environments her entire life – having lived in Brazil, the US, Italy, Honduras, Argentina and Germany. Rich with texture and detail, each composition pays tribute to her capacity to transform her archive of experiences into hallucinogenic ecosystems of their own. The lush assemblages of fauna and flora exude a visceral and intimate fragility. They speak to the mutable nature of memories as reconstructions that border on mythologies.

Nic Koller

Nic Koller is a multidisciplinary artist whose works explore the outer-boundaries of collage. He creates collage-inspired acrylic paintings, video collages, a surprising take on “analogue” video work that is shot and displayed on multiple iPhones, and even extends collage into the audiosphere by layering found sound into musical compositions. 

These works iterate upon themselves, overlapping conceptually and thematically, and share a distinct, complementary visual language. Regardless of the medium, Nic depicts common people (and places as representations of people) while embracing spontaneous, collaborative moments as the foundation of his process. This ongoing exploration has expanded Nic’s understanding of his composited style. It’s not just about seeing multiple angles and different moments in time at once; it’s also about fractured human relationships. 
  
At first glance, Nic’s pool series is an homage to David Hockney’s swimming pools of the 60’s and early 70’s. However, these paintings are not about light interacting with water or even the pools themselves. Instead, this series focuses on small group dynamics. Nic combines moments captured from his everyday life to recreate emotive, neo-figurative memories in these paintings. Each person depicted is absorbed in their separate story, including the viewer, who is simultaneously ignored and posed for, a part of the pool party group and a voyeur. The collaging and containing of Nic’s subjects suggests isolation within these groups, and that these memories have distorted, combined and simplified over time in order to form something new. 
  
Nic was raised in the outskirts of Austin, attended the Fine Arts Program at the University of Texas, and has been chasing bigger cities since. He spent eight years with the 70’s architecture and swimming pools of Los Angeles before relocating to New York, where he currently lives and works. Nic’s works were recently featured in the nightly video program at MonkeyTown 7 in LA, premiered at the Video Art Experimental Film Festival at Tribeca, and exhibited with the Brooklyn Collage Collective. Nic currently curates for STRAIGHT THROUGH THE WALL, a guerrilla Arts Collective that projects video art onto walls throughout NYC.

Mark Bradley-Shoup

Mark Bradley-Shoup earned his BFA from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in Painting and Drawing and his MFA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Studio Art. He has exhibited his work in Los Angeles, Boston, Atlanta, Nashville, Knoxville, Omaha, Miami, Birmingham, Santa Monica, New Orleans and Vancouver, B.C. In addition to his extensive exhibition record, Bradley-Shoup has been the recipient two Make Work grants, the Individual Artist Fellowship from the Tennessee Arts Commission, an Individual Arts Grant form Allied Arts of Greater Chattanooga, and a Pollock-Krasner Grant, as well as nominated for the Dedalus Foundation, Joan Mitchell Award and a George Marshall Fellowship. His work has been published in New American Paintings, Backwards City Review, and the New Orleans Gambit Weekly

Currently, Bradley-Shoup is based in Chattanooga where he lives with his wife and two children and is a Lecturer at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga. 

Statement

When it comes to studio practice, I consider myself a pluralist, meaning that I do not dedicate myself to a singular vision or practice of creating images. The intention of my abstract and representational work is to address the theme of expansion and recession, consumption and growth, and in short, the elegance of brutality. The majority of my work is derived from my observation and interaction with the natural and constructed landscape and how we respond to our sense of place in the world, as I am deeply intrigued by how we inhabit and utilize space. Such work is often derived from my own photographs, as well as mapping systems and architectural schematics.

Given my response to consumer relationships and waste, I dedicate a third series of work that is derived from discarded items that culminate in the form of collages and mixed media. The images in this particular body of work are a form of aesthetic play and experimentation of media. While the majority of my work has distinct conceptual underpinnings, this series of work presents a more sincere discourse with the concept of ‘play’ within the confines of studio practice where I allow the images and compositions to present themselves throughout the course of experimentation. While these images are not directly addressing the concepts embedded in my other work, they are directly linked and continue to influence one another in ways that are not always obvious or apparent to the viewer. My collage and mixed media work is the truest form of studio research as many of the techniques and compositions that are fleshed out within these works often find themselves residing in my more traditional painting practice.

Lauren Munns

I am fascinated with growth, evolution, and one’s perception of others, discovering and exploring the traditions and habits that stem from these concepts. The rituals between mothers and daughters through generations and the challenges of interaction with outer human spheres are highlighted in my pieces through traditionally “feminine” colors and textures, often transformed to seem as though they are something else. I manipulate imagery of the female form and its most notable parts like lips, curves, and hair. Detached from the female form, these pieces create new conversations of “where did we derive from”, “what are we”, and “where are we headed?”

www.laurenmunns.com

Cheryl Sorg

Cheryl Sorg creates with tape—collages, drawings, and wall installations, as well as a street art project, Portals of Hope. Her work is inspired by forms in nature, as well as by stories, particularly stories of change and metamorphosis, and uses color and shine as an antidote to the (abundant) ills of the world. She lives in Encinitas, California with her husband and two kiddos.

Claire Brewster

Since I could first pick up a pencil, art was the only thing I was really interested in. My journey to become a professional artist has involved living in Spain and Romania and working for a high-profile architects’ practice, amongst other things, whilst always working on my art. I have been living and working in London for over 25 years. My work has been exhibited and published widely and is in private collections all over the world. 

My process involves collage, painting, pouring, stippling, and layering paint on paper or card. My aim is to test the limits of the paper and paint. I am looking for reactions between the paint and the paper and how one layer of paint is impacted by the preceding layers. There is often buckling, cracking, and distortions in colours. The unpredictability of this is a thrill to me. I am always testing the materials, colours, and textures to act beyond what I expect and can control. I encourage the paint to do things it’s not supposed to do to create happy accidents. 

I use figures cut from glossy magazines such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and Tatler, as an act of subversion I cut up the magazines, collecting pictures of women, taking them from their original context. I transform them beyond recognition to create ethereal yet provocative works that question our notions of identity.

www.clairebrewster.com

JoAnn Goodman

My work allows me an undertone in a quiet moment. A tiny easement into a larger visual dialogue that exists within a given physical space. The weight a line carries, when color consults imagery, when balance is achieved in form. 

I am a collector of visual artifacts, both past and present. These relics include photographs, paper scraps from books and magazines, cardboard, textiles, and weathered wood and metal. 
These "found objects", often lost and discarded, tell a story beyond their material history. They evoke feelings of nostalgia. 

What does the sum of elements suggest to us? What is hidden and what is seen? 
My intent is to recognize these moments of sensitivity and elevate them. To encounter and absorb, stretching them out as long as possible... creating a visual postponement.

http://joanngoodmanart.com

Lexicon Love

Australian born and bred, I am a collage artist who works under the name Lexicon Love.

I love collage art essentially because I enjoy the process. I am less preoccupied with the end result. Any other reasons seem unimportant. 

I am drawn to the surreal and unsettling and try to inject that into my work where possible, always seeking out the unexpected connections between humour and tragedy.

Ultimately it’s the way in which collage art challenges traditional notions of aesthetics, which I find most appealing. 

My process begins by finding the trigger for each piece. This is usually a single image that really catches my eye, grabs me by the throat, and triggers the all-important starting point. 

Remixing the old with the new to create new truths, I organise and reorganise until it ‘feels right’. 

I don’t use Photoshop or Illustrator. My tools of choice closely mimic analogue techniques. It’s like working with your hands in the traditional sense.

“And those who were seen dancing were thought insane by those who could not hear the music.”
— Friedrich W. Nietzsche.