Posts tagged Collecting
Interview with Mari Shaw
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Over the summer, Create! Magazine had the pleasure of speaking with Mari Shaw, an intellectual property lawyer, author, and art collector. While the original purpose of our call was to discuss Words, Books, and the Spaces They Inhabit, Book One of her series on The Noble Art of Collecting and her forthcoming book, The Noble Art of Art Writing, we ended up having a lively conversation about how she became interested in art, her experiences in Berlin where she lives four months a year, trends in the art world, and more.

Mari Shaw’s interest in art didn’t happen by accident but it certainly wasn’t by design. It began bubbling at a young age. In her upcoming book, The Noble Art of Art Writing, she explained:

“When I was a child, the place that most impressed me was my Uncle Martin’s three-story house with a clinker brick façade topped by a pitched roof that sloped down to one side. It sat on a narrow lot of a block of shorter symmetrical houses in Skokie, a suburb of Chicago. My father called Uncle Martin’s house an eyesore. Admittedly its irregular dense blocks of cement burned into various colors and patterns was at odds with the surrounding mostly beige homes and curtained windows, but I found my uncle’s house brilliantly modern and enchanting, both outside and inside. The living room furniture included an Eames Molded Plywood straight-backed Lounge Chair, a flat sleek fireplace with a stack of logs at the ready, a phonograph system and a collection of classical records. The walls were lined with pictures, most of them made by my uncle, and shelves and shelves of books. When I visited, which was often, my uncle talked to me about art and music, frequently illustrating his point by reading from one of his books. “Art reshapes how we respond to the world”, he would tell me. And so it was that I came to understand the restorative and uplifting powers of art.”

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On her eleventh birthday, Shaw’s nascent interest in the arts hit another gear when her parents granted her permission to ride the ‘El’, the elevated subway line that runs from the suburbs, including Skokie, by herself into the heart of Chicago to visit the Art Institute. With unfettered access to this renowned collection, she became a museum regular. Closer to her suburban home, she spent untold hours in bookstores and libraries feeding her omnivorous reading addiction, a compulsion which served her well when she wrote for her college newspaper, alongside its editor Roger Ebert, who went on to become among the most important American film critics of his generation. Surprisingly, Shaw never took an art or art history course in college or graduate school. In fact, although she loved going to museums and circled around the arts in a meaningful way, she wasn’t much engaged in collecting art until later on. Like most young collectors, she started with inexpensive prints and posters.

Shaw says that moving to the east coast in 1972 marked a turning point for her. Already a self-described ‘art addict’, she was thrilled to be living across the Parkway from the Philadelphia Museum of Art which she visited every Sunday, capped by a weekend in NYC every couple of months. Before long, frequenting Philadelphia galleries sparked an enthusiasm for collecting original works by Philadelphia artists. The art of these Philadelphia artists still hangs in the five-story home she now shares with her husband Peter Shaw, including works by Thomas Chimes, Tristan Tristin Lowe, Quentin Morris, Bill Walton, Eileen Neff, David Goerk, Felipe Jesus Consalvos, Kocot and Hatton, and Jon Poblador Poblkdor. She became an active participant in the arts community in Philadelphia and still is.

Mari & Peter Shaw

Mari & Peter Shaw

In The Noble Art of Collecting, Shaw explains how her collecting jolted into an entirely new dimension in 1985, the year after the Shaw’s married.

“The first serious fight I ever had with my husband Peter was over whether we should collect [expensive] art. I had been buying art for decades…But Peter was proposing a whole different thing: buying a 5-foot oil painting on canvas by Dorothea Rockburne, titled Balance (1985). Though Balance enchanted me with its brilliant colors and scrumptious strokes, the notion of possessing it was abhorrent to the vestiges of my 1960s flower-child mentality. This painting is a masterpiece that belongs in a museum [not in our house]. ”

On the Shaw’s next Sunday visit to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Peter pointed to labels indicating most of Mari’s favorite works were donated. Mari softened, but, ever the lawyer, she required conditions for collecting, which the couple have followed with only a few exceptions, before agreeing:

(1) They only buy the work of living artists in the primary market, rather than at auction or through secondary market dealers, to ensure the artists profit from the sale of work the Shaw’s buy. Similarly, they seek out artists who are out of favor in the market, or emerging artists and artists in their local communities who have demonstrated a serious practice when they first buy their work.

(2) They do not buy to sell, though on rare occasion they do sell work they have owned for more than a decade to raise money for a non-profit. Shaw believes conservation and patronage are integral aspects of collecting. “I think the privilege of living with art in your lifetime comes with the responsibility of conserving it and supporting artists and cultural institutions.”

(3) Finally, Mari was and is passionate about sharing their collection with the public. She did not want works to sit unseen in storage permanently. Peter agreed, and the couple makes sure their works are exhibited, loaned, or displayed in their home most of the time. They accept at least one museum group per month for a private tour of their collection during the times they are in Philadelphia, and Mari enjoys making the artworks available to students, including repeat visits from classes she has taught over the years at the University of Pennsylvania and other schools. Her granddaughter Lucy’s preschool class once came for an art tour.

Read an Artblog feature with Mari Shaw  here .

Read an Artblog feature with Mari Shaw here.

So, it was that in 1985, the Shaw’s bought Dorothea Rockburne’s oil painting from the Andre Emmerich Gallery in New York, which at the time seemed a very expensive acquisition. The painting still hangs in their living room, but is promised to the Whitney Museum. Other works from their collection have also been promised or donated to other museums, including ten film and video works they donated to the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 2017. They do not turn down requests to loan work in their collection to museum exhibitions if the artists who made them request that they do.

In 2004, the diversity and pace of the couple’s collecting took a leap when Mari bought an apartment in Berlin, where she spends four warm weather months every year. While their collection which began primarily with American artists had already broadened to include European and Latin American art, and unwittingly, a concentration of women artists, the Shaw’s knowledge and access to art dealers and art knowledge soared when they established a Berlin base. Every spring, Peter joins Mari the last weekend in April for Berlin Gallery Weekend and spends two weeks looking at art in German’s exciting capital. Peter returns in early summer to travel with Mari to other European cities for a couple of weeks of Biennales, Museum exhibitions, or art fairs.

During her time alone in Berlin, Shaw reads, draws, walks, and haunts bookstores and galleries by day and often goes to the theater or a concert in the evening. In 2007, Mari served as the first American representative on an advisory committee for the quinquennial Documenta XII art exhibition held in Kassel, Germany. In 2009, she began to write her first book, Painter and Pataphysician Thomas Chimes alone in her apartment and across the street at the internet café housed in a museum dedicated to the Ramones, the band that introduced punk. She went to the café as soon as it opened, long before the Ramones crowd roused, where the owner supplied her with free tap water, a rarity in Berlin, and, now and then a free cup of coffee. In 2015, Mari met Caroline Schneider, owner of Sternberg Press in her morning Yoga class. Schneider encouraged her to write a book to be published by Sternberg Press, which eventually became The Noble Art of Collecting.

Among Mari’s current on-going projects in Philadelphia is working with Artblog to enhance its annual Art Writing Challenge. Shaw has been connected with Artblog, Philadelphia’s top online art publication, for decades. She has gone from having been featured in interviews to contributing guest posts, serving on the advisory committee and now sits on the Board. She loves the story behind the organization’s founding and its commitment to diverse, quality writing.

To this end, she saw an opportunity to expand expend and secure Artblog’s annual Art Writing Challenge by making a three-year commitment to up the amount and number of money prizes awarded to the winners. In 2019, she established a new award category in music writing as a match to contributions from others to the Art Writing Challenge. While it was exciting to solidify this online platform for celebrating emerging writers, She wanted to do more. Recognizing that there is something special about having one’s work published on printed paper, she decided the next step was to create a paper book to memorialize the history of Artblog, its Art Writing Challenge, and each of the winning essays selected since the inception of the competition. Voila! She introduced the idea for The Noble Art of Art Writing, which will be hitting bookstores next year as Book Two in her “Noble Art of Collecting” series.

We end our conversation thinking about the iconic opening to Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities:

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. It was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of Incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us…

Shaw pointed out how beautifully these well-crafted words give us perspective in our own troubling times, 160 years after Dickens wrote them.

“Bravo to Artblog for continuing to encourage and professionally acknowledge a new generation of art writers in Philadelphia”, bravo to the artists who took the Art-writing challenge, and bravo, to the winners,” she said.

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Mari Shaw will be moderating a discussion on November 15, 2019, from 2 to 3:30pm at the Kislak Center of the University of Pennsylvania at 3420 Walnut Street discussion called “Invisible and Illuminating illuminating”, based on a chapter in her upcoming book The Noble Art of Art Writing. Two-time Art Challenge winner Janyce Denise Glasper Glazer, Manager of the Percent for Art Program Manager for the City of Philadelphia and Artblog Board member Jacque Liu, and multidisciplinary artist and educator, Shelley Spector, who teaches at the University of Pennsylvania Weitzman School of Deisgn and the University of the Arts will be panelists.

Mari Shaw’s books Painter and Pataphysician Thomas Chimes and The Noble Art of Collecting can be purchased on our web shop.

Affordable Art Fair NYC Fall Edition coming this September 26 - 29!
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Affordable Art Fair NYC will return to the Metropolitan Pavilion in September for its Fall edition where you will find an inspiring and friendly atmosphere to browse thousands of original contemporary paintings, sculptures, photographs and prints showcased by 74 local, national and international galleries. The Fair will bring back some of New York City’s favorite art events such as Art After Dark and their signature Private View taking place on Wednesday, September 25th in addition to some exciting new series and programs.

Series such as the highly anticipated Young Talent Exhibition will return this fall featuring the esteemed Ceramics program at Teachers College/Columbia University. The program which goes back to the Arts and Crafts Movement of the early 20th century fosters an environment of experimentation, creative discourse and interaction between all ages. The exhibition will include outstanding examples of the ceramic works from the Teachers College/Columbia University studio.

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Another interesting feature of the fair will be the launch of the new Trade Hours initiative taking place at 11am on Thursday, September 26th and Friday, September 27th, before the fair opens to the public. Trade Hours are a chance for interior designers and decorators, architects, art consultants and more, to engage with contemporary art galleries on a professional level like never before all while networking with New York City’s most prominent design experts.

At every fall edition, Affordable Art Fair NYC also releases a Limited Edition Print in collaboration with an artist commissioned by the fair. This year the fair will exhibit South London based linocut printmaker Ellen Von Wiegand’s work which places her battle with shyness at the center of her work. By featuring her own nude body, she confronts her lifelong fear of being seen, and uses this insecurity as a tool for expression and connection. The piece will only be available in an edition of 15 and is titled ‘She Seemed Odd from the Beginning’ and relates to the artist’s interest in the idea of belonging.

There is so much to do at Affordable Art Fair NYC and with contemporary artwork by over 400 established artists and rising stars, and price points ranging from $100-$10,000 – there is something to suit every taste and wallet whether you are a first-time art buyer or a seasoned collector.

Create! Magazine is excited to be partnering with AAF and we will have limited complimentary copies of our most recent issue available at the fair cafe. For additional information and to purchase admission tickets, please visit their website.

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We recently had the opportunity to interview the fair’s Director, Vanessa Seis, where we learned a few of her picks for new highlight exhibitors to see and the events you can’t miss, as well as some useful tips for first-time art collectors!

Can you tell us about the mission or vision behind the Affordable Art Fair and what sets it apart from the ever-growing calendar of international fairs?

The first Affordable Art Fair took place 20 years ago, in 1999 in Battersea Park in London, with the vision of making art accessible to all. To this day, we create art fairs that provide a welcoming, fun, educational and inspiring environment in which seasoned art collectors as well as art novices can browse and buy contemporary art under $10,000. I think it is that clear definition and the accessibility that really set us apart from other art fairs.

Is there something about the New York Fall iteration of your fair that is particularly unique?

A feature truly unique to the NYC Fall edition is our Limited Edition Print. We launched this feature in 2013 and have since been collaborating with an artist on a limited edition print that is truly unique to the year’s fall edition. Each print features our signature pink and is limited to an edition of 10-15. This fall, we are presenting a beautiful print by British artist Ellen Von Wiegand, represented by our longtime exhibitor DECORAZON gallery at the fair. It’s an edition of 15 and unframed, the piece is priced at $300. We have footage of Ellen creating the print on our blog and it’s exciting to get this peak behind the scenes and see how the print was created.

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What are you most excited about for this edition of the fair?

I’m probably most excited about our Young Talent Exhibition featuring students of the distinguished Teachers College, Columbia University ceramics program. The program is not customarily available to a broad art collecting audience and we are so proud to debut this series of work from emerging artists of the utmost caliber, from an international and diverse student body, all before it is available to the wider art market.

Can you name a few highlight exhibitors that attendees can look forward to seeing?

This is really tough, as we have a fantastic group of 74 local, national and international galleries this year. I love the internationality of our exhibitors and am excited to introduce RISE GALLERY from Tokyo as well as Bogotá-based artist-collective Rat Trap to our NYC audience. Of the US galleries that are joining us for the first time this edition, I’m excited for Collective 131 and Kathryn Markel Fine Art to join the Affordable Art Fair family. But there are so many more that are absolutely fantastic, so make sure to check out our full list of exhibitors on the website.

Besides the great exhibitors and art, are there any special events that viewers should be aware of?

We have two signature evening events, our Private View on Wednesday, September 25 and Art After Dark on Thursday, September 26. The Private View is the first opportunity to see the fair and buy the piece you’ve been coveting and Art After Dark is our event for young patrons of the arts. Both events include a complimentary drink and Art After Dark boasts a performative element, which I’m particularly proud of. It’s so special and inspiring to find yourself in an art fair and experience musical and performative elements as you wander through the aisles and look for that special piece of art to fall in love with.

Do you have a few tips for young or new collectors or those attending a fair for the first time?

Buy what you love! But do come a bit prepared and know your spaces and your budget. We have a great feature in the front of the fair called “Under $500 Wall” that gives fairgoers a curated overview of what’s possible even on a small budget. And I would also encourage everyone to just talk to our gallerists and ask them questions! They truly embody the Affordable Art Fair spirit and are so welcoming and knowledgeable.

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Website: https://affordableartfair.com/fairs/new-york-fall

FAIR HOURS

Wednesday, September 25

Private View | 6pm–9pm

Thursday, September 26

Trade Hours | 11am-12pm

General Admission | 12pm–6pm

Art After Dark | 6pm–9pm

Friday, September 27

Trade Hours | 11am-12pm

General Admission | 12pm–6pm

Free Admission | 6pm–8pm

Saturday, September 28

Stroller Hour | 10am-11am

General Admission | 11am–8pm

Sunday, September 29

Stroller Hour | 10am-11am

General Admission | 11am–5pm

GETTING THERE

Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street.

Find us between 6th and 7th Avenues in Chelsea.

Nearest subways are 1, 2, 3, L, F and M lines.

Nearest MTA bus lines are M5, M7 and M20.

Get your tickets here. Private View Code: MCM10

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How We Started Collecting Art on a Budget and Why It Is Important to Us

By Ekaterina Popova and Alicia Puig

From Kat:

Working with hundreds of artists through Create! Magazine over the past several years has given me an incredible opportunity to discover beautiful and affordable works. I had the privilege of decorating my apartment on a budget because I was exposed to artists working in all mediums, styles, and price points. 

It first started off as trades with my own work, and later evolved to me purchasing some of my favorite pieces to add to my ever-growing collection. 

What makes owning original art special, instead of settling for a cheap canvas print from Ikea or Marshall’s is that your space will have a completely unique vibe, curated based on your visual aesthetic. It will make it so much more fun to entertain your guests because each piece has a story that you can share. I don’t know about you, but I want to cultivate an interesting life both inside and outside of my home. 

Having been both the buyer and seller of artwork, I love the process. For example, it makes me so proud to share my growth with those who invested in my work early in my career. I bet the gentleman that purchased my first large painting in 2012 is excited to see me move on to exhibit at international art fairs, work with bigger galleries, and be featured by leading blogs and publications. It’s exciting for the collector to feel as if they are a part of the artist’s journey and evolution and that they were a part of making their success happen. On the flip side, I love seeing the artists I traded with or purchased from move on to reach higher levels and increase their value in the art market. More than anything, having my community literally surround me inside my home brings me immense joy and comfort. 

If you are ready to upgrade your living space and truly make it unique, exciting, and full of the energy of the creatives that you love, take the first step and buy your favorite thing that you can afford at the moment. Most artists and galleries will work with you and can even offer a payment plan if you don’t have cash upfront for a larger piece. I have frequently let my collectors pay as low as $100 per month for larger paintings. 

A few months ago, Alicia Puig and I launched our online platform, PxP Contemporary, which will help you get started on your art collection. We wanted to create a space where new collectors can order a piece they love without awkward interactions, especially if you are new to buying art. Shop our collection of affordable works ranging from $100-$2000 to help you get started! If you aren’t quite sure which piece you want to buy first, don’t be shy about contacting an artist you’ve been following on Instagram to get more information about their work and pricing or you can look for local gallery exhibitions where you might just find something you fall in love with. With any of the works exhibited with PxP Contemporary, you can always email us with questions at info@pxpcontemporary.com. We’re happy to help!

Here are a few of my favorite pieces which are available at PxP Contemporary:

From Alicia:

Looking back to our days in college, perhaps it was always meant to be that Kat and I would be working on a gallery project together. She was technically my very first art purchase! While we were both pursuing our BFA degrees at Kutztown University, I fell in love with a beautiful landscape piece with a country home pictured against a vivid pink background that she had painted and mustered up the courage to ask her if I could buy it. At the time, we knew each other through working at an off-campus gallery, but weren’t as close as we are now so I wasn’t sure what she would say. Luckily, she agreed, gave me a price that I could fit into my student budget, and I started to realize that I could afford to collect art that I loved. I simply had to ask or else I’d never know. As I started in my career, I was able to continue to learn more about buying art from working in galleries. I learned about asking for discounts and payment plans, but also continued to buy directly from artists as well. 

For me, like with Kat, my apartment would never feel complete without art on the walls. It both looks and feels empty. Whenever I move into a new place, I get anxious until I start to curate the space because without art, it doesn’t yet have that same feeling of being my ‘home’. So this ends up being one of the very few aspects of moving that I actually enjoy, ha!

The artworks I hang around me also serve as a reminder of wonderful artists who I have worked with in the past and places I have visited, the lovely friends and family who have purchased art for me, or are just pieces that make me happy when I look at them! One of the most beautiful things about art is that it is so emotional and personal. You have the power to find art that speaks to you and surround yourself with it. It can bring consistent reminders of positive memories and spark feelings of joy. Who wouldn’t want that? 

More than the aesthetic part of collecting, however, I also enjoy that I’m supporting someone else’s career. While it is exciting to buy art from big names that you may have seen in history books or museums, it is so important to invest in the current generation of living artists. The artists who are household names now usually had patrons or other buyers back in their day and the majority definitely wouldn’t have been able to continue their work without them. This is probably the art historian in me talking, but if we don’t support those working today, how will they be able to leave their mark? Many are worried about making ends meet, not making history. So let’s make sure that we’re all doing what we can to support each other in this community. 

Not to mention, there is so much talent in a vast array of mediums both traditional and new and it is wonderful that today there is even greater recognition for women artists, artists of color, and LGBTQIA artists. We can all find our niche. Therefore, with a little bit of research you will definitely find someone’s work that is really meaningful to you. I certainly have!

These are all reasons why we created PxP Contemporary. We wanted a place that makes collecting easy: not intimidating, not complicated, not expensive, and not low quality. We’ve curated a selection of work by incredible artists from around the world and given them a platform to showcase their art and tell their stories. If you aren’t familiar with PxP yet, I invite you to take a look. I hope you’ll join us! 

In addition to our website: www.pxpcontemporary.com you can also follow along on Facebook and Instagram to stay updated with gallery news and exhibitions.

The first exhibition curated by PxP Contemporary!

The first exhibition curated by PxP Contemporary!

Art New York 2018: Interview With Wexler Gallery

www.wexlergallery.com

201 North 3rd
Street, Philadelphia PA 19106

Interview with Associate Director Victoria Rosenberger

GREGORY NANGLE  Ripple Rorschach Chair, 2018  Low polish cast bronze  24 x 20 x 38 in (seat height: 19 in)

GREGORY NANGLE

Ripple Rorschach Chair, 2018

Low polish cast bronze

24 x 20 x 38 in (seat height: 19 in)

Tell us a little bit about your gallery. What types of art do you generally focus on?

Challenging the traditional labels that categorize art, Wexler Gallery exhibits work that coexists in the expressive realms of design, fine art and contemporary glass and ceramics. Questioning and testing the boundaries of these fields, Wexler Gallery aims to present functional and non-functional work that consistently celebrates innovation as much as aesthetic beauty.

Wexler Gallery opened in 2000 in the historic district of Old City, Philadelphia. Since then, the gallery has proudly showcased extraordinary work by both master artists and the emerging talent of today. 

ROBERTO LUGO  Colin and a Queen, 2018  Terra cotta, china paint, luster  11 x 6.5 x 17 in

ROBERTO LUGO

Colin and a Queen, 2018

Terra cotta, china paint, luster

11 x 6.5 x 17 in

What should visitors expect from your booth in Art New York this year?

Wexler Gallery will be showing some exceptional original paintings by Andy Warhol, Sam Francis and Richard Hambleton, a beautiful Louise Nevelson wall sculpture and new work by three of our stand-out gallery artists Roberto Lugo, Gregory Nangle and Eric Slayton.

GREGORY NANGLE  Cosmos (Ghost mirror installation), 2018  Glass, tin, silver, lacquer, bronze  34 x 21 x 2.75 in (each)

GREGORY NANGLE

Cosmos (Ghost mirror installation), 2018

Glass, tin, silver, lacquer, bronze

34 x 21 x 2.75 in (each)

Please share a few tips for new collectors and those interested in investing in art for the first time. 

Considering art as an investment can be a smart and extremely profitable, but I always shy away from making that the most important part of the puzzle when fitting a collector with a piece of work. They have to love it and have a visceral connection to it first and foremost. It is what the artist intended, and it is what completes the lifecycle of a piece of art. There is something so rewarding about making that match and finding a forever home for a piece of art with collectors who will cherish it as if it were created only for them. If it also happens to be a great investment down the road, that is just the icing on the cake.

What are your favorite aspects of participating in art fairs?

I love meeting all of the different people that attend art fairs. Talking shop with artists, collectors, art scholars is always a fun way to spend the afternoon, but I find that those who come with no art-related background or knowledge at all often have the most interesting perceptions and perspectives when looking at, discussing and reacting to the art around them. It is a refreshing way to continuously open my own eyes to the ever-changing art world and those in and around it. 

ERIC SLAYTON  Gravity Bench, 2018  Blackened and waxed steel plate  90.5 x 11 x 14.5 in

ERIC SLAYTON

Gravity Bench, 2018

Blackened and waxed steel plate

90.5 x 11 x 14.5 in

Name a few important works we should keep an eye on when visiting. 

Wexler Gallery is exceptionally proud of the new work that we will be showing by stand-out gallery artists Roberto Lugo, Gregory Nangle and Eric Slayton. These three young men are each making very different work but are all equally pushing art boundaries and making their mark on art – what it means, how it is used and why we need it as a society.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Allan Stone Projects

Interview with Bo Joseph

Director of Allan Stone Projects

535 West 22nd Street, 3rd Floor

New York, NY 10011

www.allanstoneprojects.com

Wayne Thiebaud,    Nude (Seated Nude),  1963 Oil on canvas 60 x 36 in. Courtesy: Allan Stone Projects, New York © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Wayne Thiebaud, Nude (Seated Nude), 1963 Oil on canvas 60 x 36 in. Courtesy: Allan Stone Projects, New York © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

What is the gallery's focus at this year's fair?

Consistent with the gallery’s long history, our booth program will illustrate artistic kinship and visual legacies by presenting works by mid-level contemporary artists in dialogue with historically significant works of the Modern and Post-War period. While the works on view will span a range of styles and genres, from Abstract Expressionism to figuration, what they all have in common is a mastery of their underlying abstraction.

Are there specific artists or works that collectors should pay attention to at your booth? 

Having represented Wayne Thiebaud from 1962 to 2006, we have the unique capability to present an exceptional cross section of still life, landscape and figure paintings and works on paper by this celebrated contemporary master. With a recent exhibition at White Cube and upcoming surveys at the Shrem Museum and the Morgan Library, collectors have a timely opportunity with the works we will have on view. The largest and earliest Thiebaud we will present is a commanding yet sensitive full length figure painting, entitled Nude (Seated Nude), 1963. Another artist enjoying increasing visibility and favor with collectors, who also had early success with our gallery, is the Washington DC color field painter Thomas Downing. We will have two of his very early, very popular dot paintings, in acrylic on unprimed canvas, each from 1961. At 62 inches square, the one entitled After 5 presents an opportunity for a collector looking for a dazzling period piece whose large sense of scale defies its very manageable dimensions.

What trends have you noticed in the art market over the past few years?

The proliferation of information and general visibility of works in the marketplace seems to overwhelm and almost fog out the audience, especially newer buyers, but even more seasoned collectors. With all of the data available, collectors are in the best position ever to become knowledgeable about artists and their place in the art historical and market fabric, however the pace and volume at which the information is coming at them and the time constraints we all feel are impeding their ability to develop focus and connoisseurship. I see incredible opportunities for collectors who can slow down the viewing and hunting process, and engage dealers personally as resources and as allies in their effort to grow and evolve. 

What are some of your favorite aspects of being a part of Art Miami?

Every year, most of the visitors who arrive at Art Miami after their opening day at Basel Miami say the same thing: "the energy over here [at Art Miami] is so much more positive and accessible, and there are so many good things!" This is a great affirmation for any dealer interested in maintaining a sense of approachability and inclusiveness while also presenting works of the highest quality and desirability. Art Miami has a rewarding balance between serious business opportunities and the altruistic motivations that many dealers struggle to maintain these days.

Please give our readers a few tips for making the most of attending art fairs based on your experience.

First, slow down and try to remove the filters that can cut you off from seeing something extraordinary. Try to give yourself over to the experience of looking, rather than judging. Then engage the dealers: introduce yourself, ask them questions about the works that interest you. Even if the works you see are not the exact fit, sharing your interests could help a dealer to connect you with that life changing work of art.

Buy your tickets to Art Miami 2017 here:

(Header image: Thomas Downing, After 5, 1961 acrylic on canvas 62 x 62 in. Courtesy: Allan Stone Projects, New York © Estate of Thomas Downing)