Posts tagged Exhibition
"My Thousand Sounds" Exhibition by Painter Adam Lee at BEERS London

BEERS London is thrilled to present My Thousand Sounds, the third solo exhibition at the gallery by esteemed Australian painter Adam Lee. The title, borrowed from Christian Wiman’s 2008 poem, A Small Prayer in a Hard Wind, suggests the notion of a divine presence amidst human fragility.

In his newest paintings, Lee continues his ongoing fascination with painting as a form of private pilgrimage. For Lee, the process of painting can be perceived as a metonym for a type of spiritual voyage. His intention is that the viewer might perceive these paintings as personal votive objects linking the familiar terrains of memory, family, and loss, with that of an uncanny yet unseen sense of corporeal transcendence. In many ways the works function as relic-like objects that house much greater sublime ideas. 

About the Artist

Adam Lee works from his studio in the hills of the Macedon Ranges, Victoria, Australia, and he works mostly with traditional painting and drawing materials. His work references a wide range of sources including historical and colonial photography, biblical narratives, natural history, and most recently seem to embody more imagined or fantastical sources, investigating aspects of the human condition in relation to ideas of temporal and supernatural worlds. There is a sort of unsettling stillness to Lee’s work, a type of peaceful disquietude, where figures are situated in strange, unearthly spaces seem to tend to their own spiritual procession. As his practice has moved from more traditional ‘landscape’ painting to a practice that incorporates more emotive, poetic and narrative qualities, the work seems laboured upon with an almost religious reverence – somewhere between RB Kitaj and Rothko, oddly enough. There is a stylization of all Lee’s forms – where the figures become almost crystallized – and the viewer senses the creative and critical processes Lee undergoes to create his distinct bodies of work. From hunters, to shamanism, to fatherhood, Lee’s themes result in an informative nucleus from which he works prolifically to create large paintings and drawings that respond to a central theme. As viewers, we become complicit to the world he creates.

Exhibition dates: October 19 - November 23, 2019

Philadelphia 'Summer Rush' All Female Art Exhibition at James Oliver Gallery
Kristen Reichert  Dark Sister -  45” x 45”, Oil on canvas

Kristen Reichert Dark Sister - 45” x 45”, Oil on canvas

Summer Rush will be curated by and take place at James Oliver Gallery as well as their sister gallery HOT•BED, where custom horticulture by Bryan Hoffman will accentuate the organic feel and intense color pallets of this show. The incredible line-up includes a diverse array of works by artists: Michele Kishita, M.K. Komins, Elizabeth Bergeland, Nat Girsberger, Alicia LaChance, Juliet Sugg, Kristen Reichert, Caitlyn Grabenstein, Molly Goldfarb, Ekaterina Popova, Erica Bello, Katelyn Liepins, and Nikki Painter. 

The scope of media includes abstract, surreal and hyper-realistic painting, collage, illustration, jewelry, and much, much more. Summer Rush will magnify the entropy of the season and eviscerate a notion of excitement and activity brewing and cultivating in our spaces. Don’t miss this enticing exhibition! 

The exhibition will be on view from July 13 - August 31, 2019

For more information or private viewings, please contact jamesolivergallery@gmail.com or by phone at 267-918-7432.

www.jamesolivergallery.com

“Potholes" by Los Angeles-based artist Henry Fey
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First Amendment Gallery is pleased to announce, “Potholes,” a new solo exhibition by Los Angeles-based artist, Henry Fey. Fey’s latest collection of works incorporate acrylic painting and image transfers of the artist’s photographs in an engaging installation of twenty-four 8x10 inch pieces, a departure from his previously exhibited large-scale paintings.

For “Potholes,” Fey uses his signature blend of digital and analog processes to simulate a visual journey of a casual ride through a cityscape. Individually, the works recall innocuous colors and textures that seamlessly flow into another to then be punctuated by abrupt darkness - a pothole that only disrupts your journey momentarily before sending you back on track. Collectively, these examinations recontextualize familiar forms with the framed works acting as windows into particular moments of that ride.

Henry Fey (b. 1993) is an artist and San Francisco Art Institute alum living and working in Los Angeles. Using painting as a tool, he draws from his surroundings and recontextualizes images through abstraction.

For further inquiries on the artist or available works, please contact info@1amsf.com.

Solo Exhibition by Artist Danielle Krysa at Mayberry Fine Art
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By Ekaterina Popova

Artist Danielle Krysa has been busy in the studio this year, and it shows. I have always been a fan of her collage work, but most recently she took her studio practice on a whole other level and released a solo exhibition filled with large scale paintings and mixed media pieces that will inspire you, take your breath away and even make you laugh.

Danielle's work is on view at Mayberry Fine Art from June 1 - June 28, 2019. To purchase or inquire about available work visit www.mayberryfineart.com or email toronto@mayberryfineart.com

Danielle's Statement:

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There are, and always have been, a ridiculous number of stories in my head - stories I tell myself, stories I share out loud, and stories that become my mixed media collages. My most recent work takes those narratives a little further, inviting the viewer into my mind. There are messes and moments of pure joy that exist in an ‘artist’s chaotic and abstract world. There are also quiet white spaces – completely void of ideas – but then somehow, someway the creative machine starts churning again. A juicy stroke of paint in the perfect hue, or just the right found image and, voila, joy is restored! These artworks are a glimpse into the never-ending treasure hunt that goes on in my head – a combination of humor, personal thoughts, rich textures, found images and vibrant color.
— Danielle Krysa

Danielle is the writer behind the contemporary art site, The Jealous Curator, and the author of "Creative Block", "Collage", "Your Inner Critic Is A Big Jerk" and "A Big Important Art Book". Her work is in private collections in Canada, The United States and Europe. She has a BFA in Visual Arts, and a post-grad in graphic design and lives with her family in British Columbia.

Kle Mens at REJEKT Gallery
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REJEKT Gallery presents Hybrid Prophecy, a solo show of one of Poland's exceptional young artists, Kle Mens. Her work will be exhibited at 82a Commercial Street, a former public toilet in London’s East End and is curated by Elaine Tam. The show runs 14-23 June 2019, with an opening reception on Thursday 13th June 2019, at 6pm.

Kle Mens is a Warsaw-based visual artist working across painting, sculpture, performance and film. Following the death of her father, Kle Mens grew up in an extreme Catholic sect in Poland, under the care of her mother, a schizophrenic, devotee nun. As such, a major tenet of her work is the exploration and exploitation of religious iconography, which calls forth a brave new world of the feminine in post-secular art practice.

The paintings at the heart of her practice involve a traditional technique, one which requires the painstaking application of a hundred translucent layers. Through this steady dedication we witness the transfiguration of Kle Mens as a Saint, martyr and hybrid creature, which emphasizes the transmutable nature of timeless mythical bodies.

Having exhibited in her native country multiple times, the controversial nature of Kle Men’s work means that the artist has received notable backlash from a more conservative Polish audience, including the staging of protests outside her exhibitions.

In her first UK solo show, Kle Mens makes a brave incantation, summoning both religious martyrs and mythological hybrids to evoke the formidable force of female transformation, which underlies all her work. This exhibition sees Kle Mens revisiting the idolatry of female purity of her youth through the martyr’s series, with focus on those whose punishment was sex-related or sexuality-specific.

In a relational gesture of self-sacrifice, paint becomes embodied flesh in St. Agata, the venerated saint a prime example of the extraordinary sufferance endured by female devotees. A tense and disarming dedication, Kle Mens’ severing of her own breast is a profound moment of ekstasis propelling her into the temporality of long-standing religious order, a remark upon the continued urgency of feminist concerns. With similar spirit, she investigates the unusual, always-timeliness of the apocalypse — the recurring crisis of individual, collective and planetary future that haunts existence.

In Hybrid Prophecy, Kle Mens presents us with this provocation: a stunningly detailed film work, which animates and subverts Hans Memling's The Last Judgement. The centerpiece around which the themes of the exhibition revolve, The Last Judgement sees her assuming new bodies and fictions, while persisting with the religious iconography that she is passionately indebted to. As such, two mythological hybrids that feature in the Apocalypse of St. John become proto-Renaissance self-portraits.

Kle Mens adopts the mystical poise of the famously ambiguous, riddling Sphinx. Her traditional painting technique begets a certain magic — one of majestic strength, and silent yet photorealistic liveness — which also courses through Harpy. While the eagle is emblematic of the Polish state, in the Apocalypse it behaves as a premonition, heralding a collapse between sky and earth. With this, Kle Mens continues her elegant foray into mythic territories, their power and their promise.

Kle Mens (Klementyna Stepniewska, b. 1985) graduated from the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts in 2014 under the direction of Jarosław Modzelewski and Igor Przybylski. In 2016, she was winner of the The Geppert Competition XII, the most prestigious prize for young painters in Poland. To date, she has had three solo exhibitions, the most recent of which is Hail Mary (2019). Her works St. Rita and Kummernis are held by a key public collection, National Museum of Gdansk.

REJEKT Gallery are representatives of future pioneers of contemporary art from Eastern Europe. They curate unprecedented, unconventional events for new East artists in London. REJEKT seeks to represent and garner respect of Eastern European artists. Founder and Director, Sarah Sosnierz started promoting electronic music through hosting parties, aiming to collaborate various artists between London and Warsaw in the hope that this exchange would open new channels of cultural communication between East and Western Europe.

REJEKT do not conform to a traditional gallery setup. Their selection of unadulterated art is exhibited in unusual spaces, from industrial units to disused public toilets. Based in London, REJEKT has transitioned from illustrious clubs in Praga, flirting with underground dance club culture, to an arts platform occupying unique Heterotopian spaces; providing unconventional conduits; simultaneously mental and physical, geographical and digital representation.

For more information please contact: Anna Beketov, Damson Communications at anna.beketov@damsonpr.com or +44 (0)20 7812 0645.

PxP Contemporary Gallery Launch | 'Pilot' Exhibition
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Create! Magazine and PxP Contemporary are pleased to announce the launch of our online gallery and first-ever exhibition, Pilot. Like the premiere episode of an exciting new television series, we are thrilled to be bringing you a first look at our platform, our artists, and our curatorial style. The story behind the gallery is simple: we want to create a place where buying affordable works by talented artists from around the world is a seamless digital experience.

This first show will bring together highlights from our new roster of represented artists as well as several additional artists that we've invited specifically for this exhibition:

Anna Shukeylo
Brooke Sauer
Eliana Marinari
Huy Lam
Jennifer Small
Jenny Brown
Kestin Cornwall*
Kristen Elizabeth
Marc Scheff
Michelle Lee Rigell
Molly Mansfield
Phyllis Gorsen
Samantha Boni*
Samantha Morris
Seth Remsnyder
Shamona Stokes
Veneta Karamfilova

Any questions regarding Pilot or the gallery in general can be addressed by contacting Co-directors Alicia Puig and Ekaterina Popova at 
info@pxpcontemporary.com.

*Please note that italicized works are shipping from outside of the Unite States and require special shipping arrangements. If you are interested in purchasing works by these artists, please email us directly at info@pxpcontemporary.com. Payment plans are available upon request.

Pilot Exhibition Preview

For full artwork details including size, medium and year, please visit: www.pxpcontemporary.com

Art New York Highlight Exhibitor: Cavalier Gallery
Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)   Black Panther , 2017  Bullet Shells 36 x 72 x 12 in. (91.4 x 182.9 x 30.5 cm)

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)
Black Panther, 2017
Bullet Shells
36 x 72 x 12 in. (91.4 x 182.9 x 30.5 cm)

Art New York 2019 at Pier 94

Thu, May 2 - Sun, May 5 

www.artnyfair.com

The highly-anticipated fifth edition of Art New York returns to Pier 94 from May 2-5 during the height of New York’s art and cultural season. 

The Fair showcases noteworthy works by important artists from the contemporary, modern, post-war and pop eras presented by more than 70 international galleries. Art New York provides a fresh alternative for acquiring important, never-before-exhibited works from both primary and secondary markets, including CONTEXT, a platform for a selection of new and established contemporary galleries showcasing emerging, mid-career and cutting-edge talent. The fair annually welcomes both experienced and new art collectors who are looking to experience a carefully-curated, rich-in-content presentation of the best in the global contemporary art market. 

Art New York, at Pier 94, will begin with an elegant, invitation-only VIP Preview event on Thursday, May 2 from 2:00 to 5:00PM. The special preview offers collectors, art advisors, curators, and media the opportunity to examine and acquire the finest works available in the market before the fair opens to the public that evening and continues through Sunday, May 5. 

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)   I Love You , 2019  Bullet Shells 72 x 36 x 48 in. (182.9 x 91.4 x 121.9 cm)  ACPB0539


Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)

I Love You, 2019
Bullet Shells
72 x 36 x 48 in. (182.9 x 91.4 x 121.9 cm)
ACPB0539

Interview with Olivia Pek Gallery Associate, Cavalier Gallery

www.cavaliergalleries.com

Tell us about your gallery and the type of art you exhibit.

Adelson Galleries (New York and Boston) and Cavalier Galleries (New York, Nantucket, Greenwich) have partnered together in opening Adelson Cavalier Galleries on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Florida. With a combined 85 years of experience in the art business, each gallery brings their expertise in the fields of Impressionism, Realism, Modernism, and Contemporary Art. Adelson Cavalier Galleries exhibits emerging and established Contemporary artists, as well as historically significant artworks by 19th and 20th Century masters. Adelson Cavalier Galleries is open year-round with rotating exhibits.  

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)   Baby Panda (Patient) , 2019  Bullet Shells 15 x 11 x 9 in. (38.1 x 27.9 x 22.9 cm)  ACPB0361

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)
Baby Panda (Patient), 2019
Bullet Shells
15 x 11 x 9 in. (38.1 x 27.9 x 22.9 cm)
ACPB0361

Name a few artists that you are bringing to this year's Art New York Fair. 

Here are a few of the artists whose work we are exhibiting:

-Jim Rennert 

-William Nelson

-Guy Stanley Philoche

-Wolf Kahn

-Hans Hofmann

-Federico Uribe

-Magdalena Murua

What are you most excited about in terms of your booth selection this year?

We are excited to bring a fantastic selection of artists to Art New York this year. The centerpiece of our booth is the astonishing mixed media piece,  I Love You, by Colombian artist Federico Uribe. Just a few blocks away, at our gallery on 57th Street, our 3,800 square foot ground floor space is currently dedicated to the outstanding work of Federico Uribe, with his solo exhibition “Mesmerized,” on view through June 1st.  

Please share a few tips for fair visitors or new collectors.

Bring your checkbook!

Spotlight: Stencil Exhibition at Hashimoto Contemporary
Eelus

Eelus

April 6th - April 27th, 2019

NEW YORK CITY - Hashimoto Contemporary is pleased to present Spotlight: Stencil, a group exhibition surveying contemporary stencil art. The exhibition features an international roster of artists who push the boundaries of the medium both inside and outside the studio.

Eelus is a UK based mural artist and screen printer. An early member of the street-art bastion Pictures on Walls, Eelus is a contemporary of Banksy, Shepard Fairey, Hush, and many more working in stencils.

Jana & JS are an Austro-French duo whose work merge their shared passion for photography and urban environments. Inspired by the city, its architecture and inhabitants, their work focuses on urban landscapes, portraits and details of architecture.

Joe Lurato,

Joe Lurato,

Joe Iurato is a multidisciplinary artist whose works are built on a foundation of stencils and aerosol. Falling somewhere in between simplistic and photorealistic, his multi-layer stencils offer a distinctly clean and illustrative aesthetic.

Mando Marie

Mando Marie

Mando Marie is known for her graphic work, which uses images of tales and repetition of motifs to inform the compositions of her paintings. Her works play with elements of both the spooky and nostalgia.

OakOak is an anonymous artist who transforms everyday objects, utilizing them for his cleverly placed imagery, creating works that are a combination of humor and urban poetry.

Oak Oak

Oak Oak

Penny finds inspiration in everyday objects and often overlooked ephemera, but currency is the most prominent recurring theme in his work. He has received global critical acclaim for his hand cut, extremely detailed stencil work.

This exhibition will be on view through Saturday, April 27th. A limited edition 7-layer screen print titled Red Dress by Eelus is scheduled to be released in conjunction with the exhibition and will be available in person at the opening. For more information, additional images, or exclusive content, please email nyc@hashimotocontemporary.com

Solo Show of Harlem artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London | April 1-13, 2019
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FACTION Art Projects is delighted to present a solo show of Harlem-based artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London. Following an exhibition of Squirewell’s work at FACTION’s Harlem space, the FACTION team is bringing him to London for a display of multilayered collages, which through elements of mythology, sacred geometry and science, tackle themes of race and memory. This marks Squirewell’s first solo show outside the US. A Private View of the exhibition will be held on April 2, 2019 from 6-9pm.

Squirewell’s newest works, which have evolved over two or three years of archival study and exploration, are heavily influenced by a recent revelation of his paternal ancestry.

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Squirewell says:

‘For most of my life I believed my family were African Americans who had arrived to the US on slave ships, and it wasn’t until my twenties that I discovered my true heritage, that they were indigenous Americans. As a teacher working closely with the national curriculum I constantly see how history, even now, is curated. My art attempts to rewrite these assumed histories. The beauty of the works capture the viewer, but it’s the ugly that intrigues and leads them to look deeper.’

Rediscovering his ancestry has prompted Squirewell to question his identity, particularly in the western hemisphere. It also speaks to his battle with the omnipresent slavery narrative, when he himself comes from a black family that is not believed to have a history of slavery. Through portraiture he challenges histories and presents a more empowering narrative for black identity, seeking to change the terminology around the very word ‘black’.

The portraits have a16th, 17th and 18th century aesthetic with a contemporary awareness. The depicted figures are both real historical figures and fictitious characters that are in some way related to the artist. Through demonstrating the misrepresentations of history, they critique what we colloquially describe as fact. Each artwork is complete only after he ceremoniously burns both the collage and its hand carved frames which include motifs and markings from ancient indigenous American and African cultures.

The titles of Stan Squirewell’s works reference particular moments in our shared history. One work entitled ‘Willendorf’, is inspired by the prehistoric female figure of ‘Venus of Willendorf’, while another, ‘Amerindian’ refers to the ‘$5 Indians’ - those who, 125 years ago, paid for falsified documents that proved them to be Native American.

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About Stan Squirewell:

Stan Squirewell was born and raised in Washington, DC and currently lives and works in Harlem, New York. His artistic training began at the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. Since graduating he has continued his tutelage under many of DC’s legends including artists Michael Platt and Lou Stovall. Squirewell, is a painter, photographer, installation and performance artist. His work is multilayered and his subject matter tackles themes such as: race and memory through mythology, sacred geometry and science. He draws his inspiration from theory books, science fiction movies and novels, avant-garde jazz and indigenous storytelling. He is a (2007 MFA) graduate of the Hoffberger School of Painting where he studied with the late, Grace Hartigan. Squirewell is the first winner of the Rush Philanthropic and Bombay Sapphire Artisan series. He has performed with Nick Cave (SoundSuits) at the National Portrait Gallery and Jefferson Pinder with G-Fine Arts. He is privately and publicly collected, his works are in the Reginald Lewis Museum, the Robert Steele Collection and recently acquired by the Smithsonian for the African American Museum (2015.) Squirewell is currently exhibited as part of ‘Fashioning the body’ at projects+gallery in St. Louis alongside Bisa Butler, Soly Cissé, Renee Cox, David Antonio Cruz, Kenturah Davis, Hassan Hajjaj, Basil Kincaid, Mario Moore, Chris Ofili, Fahamu Pecou, Katherine Simóne Reynolds, Jacolby Satterwhite, Mickalene Thomas, and Kehinde Wiley.

About FACTION Art Projects:

FACTION is a flexible collective, from the team behind the hugely successful Gallery 8 and Coates & Scarry in London, who have created a unique model for artists and gallerists to work together. FACTION addresses the changing market place and the erosion of the traditional art market, where galleries were gatekeepers for artists. FACTION provides artists with promotion and opportunity to access collectors and a wider audience, with all the support of a gallery but without the constraints of the traditional model. They aim to deliver a program of artists that is diverse and inclusive. FACTION launched in February 2018 at Gallery 8 in Harlem, New York and since then has become strongly imbedded in the Striver’s Row community and a highlight of Harlem’s cultural scene.

For more information please contact Anna Beketov, anna.beketov@damsonpr.com, +44 (0)20 7812 0645

PxP Contemporary: Sell Your Work Through a New Gallery and Online Platform

Listen to the new podcast Q&A with Kat and Alicia answering common questions about the new project. We talk about why we started the gallery, what we are looking for, how to submit work, best practices and more!

Sell Your Work Through a New Gallery and Online Platform

PxP Contemporary is pleased to announce an open call for emerging artists looking to sell work via a new online gallery and curatorial platform, launching in 2019. 

Working with Create! Magazine over the years has introduced co-founders Alicia Puig and Ekaterina Popova to incredible artists and collectors alike, and we are thrilled to be connecting the two through PxP Contemporary. Our gallery will feature rotating exhibitions along with themed collections and we are planning additional curated projects as well as art fairs for the future. Initially, we will be seeking to represent a small group of approximately ten artists. These artists’ works will be promoted during the launch of our first group show and then regularly via our website, email newsletters, solo or group exhibitions, and social media channels.

Information and eligibility 

  • Artists 18+ working in any medium are welcome to submit work that is currently available for sale and is priced between $100-$2000 retail value. 

  • A fine art degree is not required to participate in our open call. 

  • Please only enter artworks that are not reserved by any other gallery or booked for exhibitions within a six month period. If work is selected by our curatorial team, artists will be contacted for additional information, images and also be asked to sign a contract. 

  • Gallery artists should prepare quality photographs of each work that will be featured on our website, including images of the sides and details, in order for potential buyers to have a complete visual representation of your piece. 

  • On any works sold via our platform, the gallery will charge a 30% commission and the artist will receive 70%. 

  • The buyer of the artwork will cover shipping costs based on a calculated formula of weight and the intended destination. 

  • Artists will then be responsible for properly packing the sold work according to our specific instructions and industry standards as well as taking it to a postal location. 

  • Artwork will be sold as is with no refunds (hence the emphasis on accurate, high-resolution images of your work) and artists will be paid promptly upon the buyer receiving the piece. 

  • All art will be insured when shipping to protect both parties. 

  • Works will be offered unframed unless it is a part of the piece or is requested by the buyer. In this case, we will coordinate the extra costs with the client. 

PLEASE PREPARE THE FOLLOWING FOR YOUR APPLICATION:

  • Artist Statement and Artist Biography 

  • Artist Resume

  • Up to ten (10) images of completed past artworks

  • Please submit only jpg files

  • Images should be no more than 5MB in file size

  • File Name: Images should be titled in the following manner: Last Name, First Name, a number corresponding to the image description sheet (For example: DoeJane01; DoeJane02; etc.)

  • Annotated Image List: Title of work, Dimensions, Medium, Year of Completion, Price

  • A non-refundable submission fee of $10 for up to ten images is required

 

We will continue to review applications on a rolling basis, but the deadline for the initial round of represented artists and the first group exhibition will be May 1, 2019.

 Thank you and we look forward to reviewing your work. Email questions to: alicia@createmagazine.com

Website coming soon: www.pxpcontemporary.com

Sacred Geometry: Interview with Phyllis Gorsen and Paula Cahill
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Phyllis Gorsen

I have created a series of multi-canvased paintings that describe how we are all connected together by having elements of everyday life in common. I use symbols in both visual and written language as depictions of these commonalities highlighting the connections created by their universality despite varying perceptions. I use a combination of abstraction and representation in the work.These paintings explore connection in two ways: larger multi-canvased compositions that are broad symbolic illustrations of elements of common human experiences, and smaller “couples” paintings that represent two universal elements symbolically paired together in written language. These works are more specific in nature. 
My paintings are intended to move the eye using energetic patterns, movement and vibrancy. My hope is that viewer is captivated by the visual allure of the surface to allow for a slow unveiling of the meaning of the work – which is that we all connected by sharing many of these human experiences.

-Phyllis Gorsen

Tell me about your creative journey so far. 

I have been painting most of my life, primarily figures.  What I loved most about figurative work is that many times it contains the thing that is most basic to all of us. Race, gender identity, religion, etc. inform our experiences and perspectives and thus there are multitudes of viewpoints stemming from that. But, even with these differences, there are overarching similarities that we are share. That is the place that I want to put the emphasis on. As an artist, my work has always been about connection. I try to portray the human aspects that are intrinsic to all people regardless of our differences.  

When I went back to school and got my MFA in 2014 from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, I studied the figurative painters that I loved so much, mainly the Bay Area Figurative Painters like David Park and Richard Diebenkorn. It was then that I started to concentrate on figurative work that captures the patterns of everyday life, but I never made my work autobiographical. I was always much more interested in those spaces that are common to everyone. And although the figure was a catalyst for my work, between the use of color, collage, and pattern, there has always been a strong abstract component. After I graduated, I started to play around in the studio thinking more about the literal interpretation of patterns of everyday life. That’s when I took the turn into geometric abstract work.

As I delved deeper into the abstract elements, both in subject matter and execution, I began portraying components of everyday life in symbolic terms. I created paintings mimetic of the human experience without the use of figures. Most people don’t realize that my paintings contain symbols, I think mostly because I try not to make them too obvious. I prefer a slow unveiling of the meaning behind the work. I do fuse abstraction and representation within many of my paintings as long as I feel they describe the various facets of our commonalities. Some of these elements are recognizable and others are symbolic interpretations of components such as language, technology, nature, culture, etc. Often, I use lines to bridge these symbols together, illustrating how they connect us together. Linguistically, I am exploring the use of symbolism through my titles. These play a critical role in telling the story of each piece and drive the composition of some paintings. All of my work has a high degree of vibrancy and vibration that is a constant within my practice.

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What inspired you to create the work you are including in the exhibition at James Oliver Gallery?


My works in the show contain pieces that are more complex and have various visual components and meanings, as well as paintings that are more distilled and simplified. In addition to the complex paintings that are attached to multiple canvases, I wanted to include paintings that were separate but related. So I have works that are both interconnected such as “Essence and Pursuit” and outwardly connected such as “Of a Circular Nature…”- which are a set of four paintings? It was an exciting exploration in the idea of connection to depict it internally and externally. All of the work is painted on circular canvases or within circular spaces. The circle to me is beautiful in that there are no defined edges. They feel like complete bodies to me and allow me to investigate the idea of connection in a more fluid way.


What are some ongoing themes or ideas you have been exploring within your paintings?

As I mentioned before, I focus on how the commonality of shared patterns connects people together by using symbolism- both abstract and representational. I personally feel that the most powerful works are the ones that combine visceral sensory experiences with fundamental content underneath. I like making the surfaces of my paintings beautiful with the hope that the viewer is enticed enough to uncover the underlying message of human connection. In “Interweave”, the idea was to illustrate that regardless of our differences, people are internally woven together creating a society. In “Interlink #1-12”, the 12 separate canvases each represents a microcosm of a society that is linked to ones surrounding it. In “Essence and Pursuit”, there are eight canvases representing elements of humanity. From the top left panel going across and down, they are: Connection, Essence (red rings emanating outward), diverse populations of people moving together and apart (top middle), Vegetation, Geography, Technology (bottom middle), Knowledge, and Cities.


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What can visitors expect from this exhibition?  

Sacred Geometry describes the patterns found in nature from the most minuscule particles to the greater cosmos. We obviously took on the title of the show “Sacred Geometry” with some poetic license. The idea behind the show was to exhibit work that had geometric abstract elements that also incorporated the meaning behind it.

When you walk into Hot-Bed Gallery, the viewer is immersed in a room of vibrant pattern and color. It really is visually exciting due to the interplay of color and movement from our work. I was really happy to be exhibiting with Paula Cahill because I am an admirer of her work and I felt that our paintings would fit well together. Hopefully, the audience will be seduced by the luminous surfaces to want to know more about the paintings.

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Paula Cahill

Is it possible to pinpoint when straight and curved lines were invented? The contours of ancient rock paintings give us organic lines and line is evident in the motifs of early Greek vessels and Egyptian Funerary art. Renaissance artists were lauded for their invention of perspective, a system contrived of straight lines that extend to infinity. Modernists isolated and formalized gestural line as subject. I strive to extend this conversation by painstakingly mixing and repeatedly laying down up to 100 gradients of color in my attempts to contemporize line.

- Paula Cahill

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Tell me about your creative journey so far. 

I studied figurative painting for many years before transitioning to complex abstract paintings. While in Graduate School, one of my critics looked at my figurative work and told me that if I wanted to paint flesh better, I should paint a fish. So, I did. When he came back, he said: "That's a pretty good fish, you should paint another one." Apparently, my other critics also thought that I should paint fish and they told me so. I never figured out if they thought I painted great fish or lousy flesh, but I kept painting fish. Pretty soon, I became interested in the way fish were moving in my aquarium and I began tracking their movements with line. I used those lines to make my first linear abstract paintings.

Being an abstract painter was like being a kid in a candy store for me. I wanted to experiment and try every type of abstract painting. I experimented for about six years. When I decided to get serious about showing my work, I asked friends for advice. They basically told me that I was a gallerist's nightmare! I needed to settle down to create a cohesive body of work. That's when I returned to the lines and I’ve been developing this body of work for almost two years. I’m glad that I made this commitment because the work has become more precise and complex. I’ve moved beyond fish and have used a variety of catalysts for the paintings. Art historical reference, movement, music, geometry, and memories have all been sources for my paintings.

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What inspired you to create the work you are including in the exhibition at James Oliver Gallery?

To me line is everything! Line is everywhere and it has been with us forever. I often wonder if we can pinpoint when straight and curved lines were invented. The contours of ancient rock paintings give us organic lines and line is evident in the motifs of early Greek vessels and Egyptian Funerary art.Renaissance artists were lauded for their invention of perspective, a system contrived of straight lines that extend to infinity. Modernists isolated and formalized gestural line as a subject. I strive to extend this conversation by painstakingly mixing and repeatedly laying down up to 100 gradients of color in my attempts to contemporize line.

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What can visitors expect from this exhibition?  

My new 2019 paintings will be exhibited for the first time in Sacred Geometry at Hot Bed. Geometry and historical reference are heavily weighted in this work. I think that viewers will be surprised to see some color shifts and compositional changes.

Paradigm Gallery at Art on Paper 2019

For their fourth showing at Art on Paper, Paradigm Gallery will be presenting artwork by Alex Eckman-Lawn, Drew Leshko, Evan Hecox, Hyland Mather, and Seth Clark. The artists have all created their artwork using their own unique methods, but will be coming together for a fair display not to miss. Click on the artist names below to see their collections. The newest pieces by each artist will be added to their linked collection pages on Friday, March 8th. Email sara@paradigm-gallery.com if you would like to see a preview of the collections prior to that date.

Paradigm Gallery | Booth 105 | Featured Artists
Alex Eckman-Lawn
Drew Leshko
Evan Hecox
Hyland Mather
Seth Clark

Fair Dates/Hours/Location
March 7 - 10, 2019 | 299 South Street - Pier 36, Downtown Manhattan

OPENING NIGHT
Art on Paper Preview
Thursday, March 7, 2019 • 6:00pm to 10:00pm

PUBLIC FAIR HOURS
Friday, March 8 • 11:00am to 7:00pm
Saturday, March 9 • 11:00am to 7:00pm
Sunday, March 10 • 12:00pm to 6:00pm 

Podcast: Giving a Voice to Artists with Christina Nafziger
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On this episode of Art & Cocktails, Kat introduces you to Christina Nafziger who frequently contributes to Create! Magazine. We chat about working in the arts, studying in London, navigating side hustles and more. Christina shares her journey so far and gives insights to help artists get more press. 

Christina is a freelance writer, journalist, and editor focusing on contemporary art and visual culture. She regularly contribute to Sixty Inches From Center and Create! Magazine. Her writing writing has also been published in places like THE SEEN: Chicago’s International Online Journal of Contemporary & Modern Art, and Exhibitions on the Cusp.

Christina received her BA in Art History from Herron School of Art & Design and my MA in Contemporary Art Theory from Goldsmiths University of London, where her research focused on performativity within photography as well as the imprint of digital image archiving on memory and identity. Her current research centers on gender performativity within virtual platforms and the development of alternative spaces as a means of reimagining identity and reclaiming agency.

Work by  Sara Anstis

Work by Sara Anstis

California Artists: Brea Art Gallery Call for Entries

This annual juried exhibit showcases artwork from all over the state of California. MICA strives to highlight artists in all stages of their careers and offers them a chance to compete for a number of awards, including the coveted solo show opportunity. This regional show features artwork from an extensive variety of mediums and explores creative movements happening in California. 

Entry Deadline: February 28, 2019

Jaime Brett Treadwell at Pentimenti Gallery

The paintings on view in shift alt delete point to a slight detour from previous directions. Experimentation with new ideas, specifically architectural and mechanical drawing methods, combined with my persistent 1980’s childhood influences, including MTV graphics, digital synthesizers, and Miami Vice, has resulted in a deeper complexity of interwoven parts. I chose the exhibition title shift alt delete after recognizing the correlation between keyboard functions and the shifting realities present throughout this body of work. The shift key is designed to shift from one version to another, such as lower case to upper case. Alt, short for alternate, is designed as a modifier key to adjust or alter change. This ability to change or manipulate reality parallels my recent investigations regarding visual deceptions and spatial ambiguity through line, shape, color, and space. Similar to the key functions, elements in my painting often serve multiple roles. For example, a thin line may operate as the edge of a shape and also contribute to a repeating pattern of lines, later to return as a single line that cuts through another form or shape. These moments of co-existence throughout the painting disrupt the viewer’s perception of truth, often bending reality. Similar to pressing the shift, alt or delete key, these paintings can quickly switch identities back and forth, as they suggest alternate realities or a fictional universe.

www.jaimetreadwell.com


Pentimenti Gallery 

Nov. 10th – Dec. 20th

Philadelphia, PA