Posts tagged Exhibitions
Johan Barrios Solo Exhibition, "Monólogo"

 

J O H A N  B A R R I O S

 

Monólogo

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Artist Reception: Friday, October 25, 6:00 – 8:30 pm

Anya Tish Gallery is pleased to announce Monólogo, a solo exhibition of new work by Johan Barrios, a Colombian artist now living and working in Houston. This is Barrios’ second solo exhibition with Anya Tish Gallery. Monólogo features paintings that convey the paradoxical dimensions of one-self. Barrios' work has surreal and cinematic qualities with a haunting aesthetic that is at once captivating and unsettling. 

“For me, all the pieces that are part of this project called Monólogo are the result of questioning what we call identity. All these self-portraits try to give an irrational look at how we are exposed to a symbolic solitude that distances us from any collective system. From my perspective, these figures are a replacement for a certain emotion that can often be related to fears and failures and become vulnerable to the conflicts that arise in the work itself creating a wider range of questions between image and spectators.”    - Johan Barrios

 Johan Barrios, born in 1982, is one of the most technically accomplished painters of his generation. Barrios’ work provokes the unique ability to make us feel and sympathize with his images invoking a harmony of the imagination and cognitive thought. Using himself as his own model he creates psychological portraits full of contradictions, doubt, beauty and anxiety, that exist between the surface of the canvas and trompe l’oeil illusion. Barrios pays close attention to every detail, expertly rendering muscle tone, hands, fabric wrinkles and flyaway hairs. He effortlessly translates light and shadow, executing his pieces with the proficiency of old masters. Depicted in a state of suspended tension, the subject has no identity, no narrative, no location, yet carries a diffused emotional resonance that addresses existential issues such as loneliness, self-discovery, intimacy and fragility.

Johan Barrios received his Masters in Fine Arts from the Universidad de Antioquia in Medellín, Colombia, and has since exhibited across the globe in such major cities as Zürich, Switzerland; New York City, New York; Barcelona, Spain; Cologne, Germany; Montreal, Canada; Los Angeles, California; and Denmark. His work has been featured in numerous renowned print and online publications, including ArtMaze, HI FRUCTOSE, Minus 37, The Jealous Curator, and Juxtapoz Arts and Culture Magazine.

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Wandering Players by Delphine Hennelly
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pt.2
Wandering Players
Delphine Hennelly


Opening Reception: Saturday October 12th, 12-10pm.
Artist Talk: Saturday, October 12th at 4pm.
Showing Through: Friday, November 1st, 2019

1523 b Webster St. Oakland, CA 94612
info@part2gallery.com

pt.2 is excited to present “Wandering Players” a solo exhibition by Delphine Hennelly opening Saturday, October 12th in Downtown Oakland. The exhibition will feature a new series of paintings by the New York based artist. pt.2 gallery is located at 1523 b Webster St. and is just blocks away from both 12th & 19th St Bart Stations. Opening receptions at pt.2: are always free and open to the public. To receive a preview of the exhibition please contact info@part2gallery.com.

Taking as axiomatic the notion that there is no time but the present, which. contains past and future I use repetition as a means to employ this concept of time in the paintings. Much of this thought stems from Gilles Deleuze’s ideas on Difference and Repetition. I enjoy the idea of a liminal space where past and future can be inscribed in a present. In repeating a motif or an image I see the space of a continuity in time simultaneously accepting the fact of the still image. A painting will never be a narrative in movement such as would happen in film but perhaps a painting can allude to the temporal or the notion of an omnipresent event. I enjoy how in every repetition there occurs something specific, and therefore new in the work. It is within this structural thought that drawing becomes a key component of the work. Welding concept with form I lean towards bending the nature of the paint to fulfill a graphic need mimicking ideas of reproduction, the print, paper, ink, a doodle.

Wandering Players takes it’s title from the name given to actors of the Elizabethan period in England; Strolling Players. The figures in my paintings take on the role of actors playing archetypes in their ubiquitous banality. Slightly costumed, meandering a stage set in a bucolic landscape , an abstraction of the pastoral, the Idyllic. Anachronistic, their journeys remain random. The old dictum about the point being not the end of something, or the arrival, but how you get there. At the outset of any journey one does not often or always know where it will take you and what you will encounter. Unexpected things happen, you go up blind alleys, you get lost but you always bring something back that you can latch onto for the next foray. There are struggles, rocks, impediments but there are also discoveries and joys, sun and shade, moments of respite.

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"In the Drift" By Kai and Sunny at Corey Helford Gallery
“Onward Shift” (acrylic on linen, 46” round)

“Onward Shift” (acrylic on linen, 46” round)

Corey Helford Gallery Presents:

In the Drift 
By Kai and Sunny

  

OPENING RECEPTION

September 21, 2019 | 7pm - 11pm

 

ON VIEW

September 21 – October 26, 2019

 

COREY HELFORD GALLERY

571 S. Anderson St. Los Angeles, CA 90033

Open Tuesday-Saturday, 12pm - 6pm

(310) 287-2340

Downtown Los Angeles’ Corey Helford Gallery is proud to announce a solo exhibition of all new works from London-based artist duo Kai and Sunny. Opening Saturday, September 21st in Gallery 3, In the Drift marks the first solo show for the duo at the gallery.

The award-winning duo take inspiration from the natural world and the patterns and forms it manifests. In the Drift showcases the duo's uniquely distinguishable compositions of large acrylic paintings on linen and archival ballpoint pen works on paper.

Regarding the show, Kai and Sunny share, "The show embraces the concept of change; flowing deconstructed landscapes are continuously moving taking you from one place to another. Creating dynamic movement through line and color shifts representing a driving action or force. The lines in the works push and pull each other as if caught in a state of flux whilst other areas are free and exude speed and energy. The process is a methodical building of thin intricate lines upon each other. The result showing powerful kinetic compositions while a delicacy remains. The lines can change your perception of the shape while the foreground and background invite you to float in-between the two."

In conjunction with the exhibition, Kai and Sunny have collaborated with Element Skateboards on a set of new skate decks and they'll be releasing a limited-edition seven color silkscreen print (available to purchase at CHG on opening night); plus the duo will be painting two murals while they're visiting Southern California for the opening (9/21). The first mural will be painted just before the opening at Element Skateboards HQ in Huntington Beach and the second larger mural will be painted just after the opening at The Berrics, the downtown Los Angeles-based skatepark owned by Steve Berra and Eric Koston. The artwork depicted on both murals will be featured in the duo's In the Drift show. 

In the Drift opens Saturday, September 21st from 7pm-11pm in the Gallery 3, alongside a solo show from Ian Francis, entitled The Call of the Void, in the Main Gallery and a two-artist show with Jillian Evelyn and Kristen Liu-Wong, entitled Not a Flower Alone, in Gallery 2. Corey Helford Gallery is located at 571 S. Anderson St. Los Angeles, CA 90033 and normal hours are Tuesday – Saturday, from 12pm - 6pm.

About Kai and Sunny:

Kai and Sunny (born 1975 and 1977, respectively) are a UK based artist duo. They both graduated from the Epsom School of Art in Surrey, United Kingdom with degrees in Art and Design. They have collaborated with author David Mitchell, designer Alexander McQueen, artist Shepard Fairey and have won numerous accolades, including a 2012 D&AD Design Award and a 2015 LIA award. Works by Kai and Sunny have been exhibited internationally at institutions such as Haunch of Venison and are included in the Victoria & Albert Museum Print Archive Collection.

 

"The idea that such sophisticated and detailed pieces are executed by hand is mind-blowing."

– Shepard Fairey

 

"The highly acclaimed, award-winning art duo Kai and Sunny have risen to notoriety over the past few years thanks to their beautiful and highly-detailed nature-inspired images."

– Hypebeast

 

About Corey Helford Gallery:

Corey Helford Gallery (CHG) was first established in 2006 by Jan Corey Helford and her husband, television producer and creator, Bruce Helford (The ConnersAnger ManagementThe Drew Carey ShowGeorge Lopez) and has since evolved into one of the premier galleries of New Contemporary art. Its goals as an institution are the support and growth of young and emerging, to well-known and internationally established artists. 

CHG represents a diverse collection of international artists, primarily influenced by today’s pop culture and collectively encompassing style genres such as New Figurative Art, Pop Surrealism, Neo Pop, Graffiti and Street Art. CHG is located in Downtown Los Angeles in a robust 12,000 square foot building presenting new exhibitions approximately every six weeks.

For more info and an upcoming exhibition schedule, visit CoreyHelfordGallery.com and connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

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Kle Mens at REJEKT Gallery
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REJEKT Gallery presents Hybrid Prophecy, a solo show of one of Poland's exceptional young artists, Kle Mens. Her work will be exhibited at 82a Commercial Street, a former public toilet in London’s East End and is curated by Elaine Tam. The show runs 14-23 June 2019, with an opening reception on Thursday 13th June 2019, at 6pm.

Kle Mens is a Warsaw-based visual artist working across painting, sculpture, performance and film. Following the death of her father, Kle Mens grew up in an extreme Catholic sect in Poland, under the care of her mother, a schizophrenic, devotee nun. As such, a major tenet of her work is the exploration and exploitation of religious iconography, which calls forth a brave new world of the feminine in post-secular art practice.

The paintings at the heart of her practice involve a traditional technique, one which requires the painstaking application of a hundred translucent layers. Through this steady dedication we witness the transfiguration of Kle Mens as a Saint, martyr and hybrid creature, which emphasizes the transmutable nature of timeless mythical bodies.

Having exhibited in her native country multiple times, the controversial nature of Kle Men’s work means that the artist has received notable backlash from a more conservative Polish audience, including the staging of protests outside her exhibitions.

In her first UK solo show, Kle Mens makes a brave incantation, summoning both religious martyrs and mythological hybrids to evoke the formidable force of female transformation, which underlies all her work. This exhibition sees Kle Mens revisiting the idolatry of female purity of her youth through the martyr’s series, with focus on those whose punishment was sex-related or sexuality-specific.

In a relational gesture of self-sacrifice, paint becomes embodied flesh in St. Agata, the venerated saint a prime example of the extraordinary sufferance endured by female devotees. A tense and disarming dedication, Kle Mens’ severing of her own breast is a profound moment of ekstasis propelling her into the temporality of long-standing religious order, a remark upon the continued urgency of feminist concerns. With similar spirit, she investigates the unusual, always-timeliness of the apocalypse — the recurring crisis of individual, collective and planetary future that haunts existence.

In Hybrid Prophecy, Kle Mens presents us with this provocation: a stunningly detailed film work, which animates and subverts Hans Memling's The Last Judgement. The centerpiece around which the themes of the exhibition revolve, The Last Judgement sees her assuming new bodies and fictions, while persisting with the religious iconography that she is passionately indebted to. As such, two mythological hybrids that feature in the Apocalypse of St. John become proto-Renaissance self-portraits.

Kle Mens adopts the mystical poise of the famously ambiguous, riddling Sphinx. Her traditional painting technique begets a certain magic — one of majestic strength, and silent yet photorealistic liveness — which also courses through Harpy. While the eagle is emblematic of the Polish state, in the Apocalypse it behaves as a premonition, heralding a collapse between sky and earth. With this, Kle Mens continues her elegant foray into mythic territories, their power and their promise.

Kle Mens (Klementyna Stepniewska, b. 1985) graduated from the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts in 2014 under the direction of Jarosław Modzelewski and Igor Przybylski. In 2016, she was winner of the The Geppert Competition XII, the most prestigious prize for young painters in Poland. To date, she has had three solo exhibitions, the most recent of which is Hail Mary (2019). Her works St. Rita and Kummernis are held by a key public collection, National Museum of Gdansk.

REJEKT Gallery are representatives of future pioneers of contemporary art from Eastern Europe. They curate unprecedented, unconventional events for new East artists in London. REJEKT seeks to represent and garner respect of Eastern European artists. Founder and Director, Sarah Sosnierz started promoting electronic music through hosting parties, aiming to collaborate various artists between London and Warsaw in the hope that this exchange would open new channels of cultural communication between East and Western Europe.

REJEKT do not conform to a traditional gallery setup. Their selection of unadulterated art is exhibited in unusual spaces, from industrial units to disused public toilets. Based in London, REJEKT has transitioned from illustrious clubs in Praga, flirting with underground dance club culture, to an arts platform occupying unique Heterotopian spaces; providing unconventional conduits; simultaneously mental and physical, geographical and digital representation.

For more information please contact: Anna Beketov, Damson Communications at anna.beketov@damsonpr.com or +44 (0)20 7812 0645.

Solo Show of Harlem artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London | April 1-13, 2019
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FACTION Art Projects is delighted to present a solo show of Harlem-based artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London. Following an exhibition of Squirewell’s work at FACTION’s Harlem space, the FACTION team is bringing him to London for a display of multilayered collages, which through elements of mythology, sacred geometry and science, tackle themes of race and memory. This marks Squirewell’s first solo show outside the US. A Private View of the exhibition will be held on April 2, 2019 from 6-9pm.

Squirewell’s newest works, which have evolved over two or three years of archival study and exploration, are heavily influenced by a recent revelation of his paternal ancestry.

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Squirewell says:

‘For most of my life I believed my family were African Americans who had arrived to the US on slave ships, and it wasn’t until my twenties that I discovered my true heritage, that they were indigenous Americans. As a teacher working closely with the national curriculum I constantly see how history, even now, is curated. My art attempts to rewrite these assumed histories. The beauty of the works capture the viewer, but it’s the ugly that intrigues and leads them to look deeper.’

Rediscovering his ancestry has prompted Squirewell to question his identity, particularly in the western hemisphere. It also speaks to his battle with the omnipresent slavery narrative, when he himself comes from a black family that is not believed to have a history of slavery. Through portraiture he challenges histories and presents a more empowering narrative for black identity, seeking to change the terminology around the very word ‘black’.

The portraits have a16th, 17th and 18th century aesthetic with a contemporary awareness. The depicted figures are both real historical figures and fictitious characters that are in some way related to the artist. Through demonstrating the misrepresentations of history, they critique what we colloquially describe as fact. Each artwork is complete only after he ceremoniously burns both the collage and its hand carved frames which include motifs and markings from ancient indigenous American and African cultures.

The titles of Stan Squirewell’s works reference particular moments in our shared history. One work entitled ‘Willendorf’, is inspired by the prehistoric female figure of ‘Venus of Willendorf’, while another, ‘Amerindian’ refers to the ‘$5 Indians’ - those who, 125 years ago, paid for falsified documents that proved them to be Native American.

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About Stan Squirewell:

Stan Squirewell was born and raised in Washington, DC and currently lives and works in Harlem, New York. His artistic training began at the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. Since graduating he has continued his tutelage under many of DC’s legends including artists Michael Platt and Lou Stovall. Squirewell, is a painter, photographer, installation and performance artist. His work is multilayered and his subject matter tackles themes such as: race and memory through mythology, sacred geometry and science. He draws his inspiration from theory books, science fiction movies and novels, avant-garde jazz and indigenous storytelling. He is a (2007 MFA) graduate of the Hoffberger School of Painting where he studied with the late, Grace Hartigan. Squirewell is the first winner of the Rush Philanthropic and Bombay Sapphire Artisan series. He has performed with Nick Cave (SoundSuits) at the National Portrait Gallery and Jefferson Pinder with G-Fine Arts. He is privately and publicly collected, his works are in the Reginald Lewis Museum, the Robert Steele Collection and recently acquired by the Smithsonian for the African American Museum (2015.) Squirewell is currently exhibited as part of ‘Fashioning the body’ at projects+gallery in St. Louis alongside Bisa Butler, Soly Cissé, Renee Cox, David Antonio Cruz, Kenturah Davis, Hassan Hajjaj, Basil Kincaid, Mario Moore, Chris Ofili, Fahamu Pecou, Katherine Simóne Reynolds, Jacolby Satterwhite, Mickalene Thomas, and Kehinde Wiley.

About FACTION Art Projects:

FACTION is a flexible collective, from the team behind the hugely successful Gallery 8 and Coates & Scarry in London, who have created a unique model for artists and gallerists to work together. FACTION addresses the changing market place and the erosion of the traditional art market, where galleries were gatekeepers for artists. FACTION provides artists with promotion and opportunity to access collectors and a wider audience, with all the support of a gallery but without the constraints of the traditional model. They aim to deliver a program of artists that is diverse and inclusive. FACTION launched in February 2018 at Gallery 8 in Harlem, New York and since then has become strongly imbedded in the Striver’s Row community and a highlight of Harlem’s cultural scene.

For more information please contact Anna Beketov, anna.beketov@damsonpr.com, +44 (0)20 7812 0645

Writing About Art: Podcast Interview with Emily Steer, Elephant Magazine

Let's go behind the scenes of Elephant Magazine!

I have been a long time fan of Elephant and recently got the amazing opportunity to interview editor Emily Steer. Emily shares her personal story and talks about how she took an untraditional route to journalism, overcame imposter syndrome and eventually established herself as the editor of this leading art magazine.

This episode includes bonus tips for artists and gives insight into how contemporary art editors discover new talent.

Emily Steer, Photography by Hannah Miles

Emily Steer, Photography by Hannah Miles

Elephant West. Photography by Dirk Lindner

Elephant West. Photography by Dirk Lindner

Emily’s Artist Picks

Maisie Cousins

Maisie’s work is repulsive and seductive at the same time, a squidgy conglomeration of weird food and lots of oily liquid, with beautiful colour palettes including pops of electric blue, pale pink and minty green. It’s fun and celebratory—a glorious mess. Maisie was the first artist to show at Elephant West, and she created a wonderful environment that made the space feel so playful. She is a classic Elephant artist.

https://elephant.art/event/maisie-cousins-dipping-sauce/

Maisie Cousins

Maisie Cousins

 Ramona Zoladek

Ramona has just won the Elephant x Griffin Art Prize, and her work is a subtle balance of manmade and natural elements, with delicate pea shoots growing through the cracks. It is political work which draws its viewer in first and foremost through visual intrigue.  

https://elephant.art/life-hangs-urgently-balance-ramona-zoladeks-sculptures/

Ramona Zoladek

Ramona Zoladek

 Ben Sledsens

I have a (perhaps childish) love of animals in art, and I especially enjoy Ben’s work. His animals are wild but oddly regimented, made sleek and elegant in his working of them.

Ben Sledsens

Ben Sledsens

 Tristan Pigott

Tristan’s practice is really developing at the moment—he’s currently studying sculpture at the RCA and his dream-like paintings are currently getting even more of a hallucinatory edge. There’s something really languid and peaceful about them, even in their weirdness. 

Tristan Pigott

Tristan Pigott

 Anna Liber Lewis

Anna is the next solo artist to show at Elephant West, alongside the musician Four Tet, who she has known since childhood. Her paintings are lively and gutsy, and often sexual without being explicit. There’s a great energy to her work.

Anna Liber Lewis

Anna Liber Lewis

 Hun Kyu Kim

More animal paintings. Bunnies wearing umbrellas for hats, woodland pig parties and eyeballs drinking martinis; Hun Kyu Kim’s work is like Beatrix Potter on acid.

Hun Kyu Kim

Hun Kyu Kim

 

Robin Francis Williams

Robin created one of my favourite paintings at Frieze, depicting a crazed-looking woman combing her hair with a fork. Her work is bold and frenzied, and her depiction of light is stunning.

Robin Francis Williams

Robin Francis Williams

Elephant Magazine’s Manifesto

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5 Questions with a Curator: Eileen Owens, Philadelphia Museum of Art

We were so thrilled to be able to chat with Eileen Owens, currently a Research and Exhibitions Assistant in the European Paintings Department at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. She curated the exhibition ‘Biting Wit and Brazen Folly: British Satirical Prints, 1780s–1830s', which opened at the museum earlier this year. The show will be on view for a few more weeks, until December 5th, so we highly recommend that you go and check it out!

Connoisseurs, 1799, by Thomas Rowlandson. Hand-colored etching. Given to the Philadelphia Museum of Art by Carl Zigrosser, 1974.

Connoisseurs, 1799, by Thomas Rowlandson. Hand-colored etching. Given to the Philadelphia Museum of Art by Carl Zigrosser, 1974.

Installation view. Photo credit: Joseph Hu.

Installation view. Photo credit: Joseph Hu.

Talk about your background in art and art history. Was it something that you were always interested in growing up?

Yes and no. I grew up in the southeast of Ireland, in a medieval city that was steeped in history. I would visit Kilkenny Castle often (my sister and I could probably still recite the tour now, decades later!) and loved learning about the city’s history. So, I had an appreciation for art in a very broad sense, but I didn’t visit my first art museum until I was a 17. When I moved to New York State, my high school offered an art history class, and I was immediately intrigued--I could actually learn about all these paintings I only vaguely knew about from TV or magazines. Taking that class, and having opportunities to visit the Met and MoMA on field trips, truly unlocked something in me. It was as if I was suddenly in on this secret new world--one I felt profoundly connected to.   

Even with this passion though, the understanding that I could have a career working in an art museum came to me fairly late. It wasn’t until I studied abroad in Rome my junior year of college that I committed to adding Art History to my major. The cliché of falling in love with art in Rome is true for me. I challenge anyone to live there for three months and not contemplate how important, enlightening, and continuously relevant art is in our shared history. Not to mention the sheer thrill of seeing so much beauty in one place! It was impossible to ignore.

You went on to study at Temple University for your MA in Art History. What was your focus and what did you enjoy about the program?

I studied nineteenth-century French art, with a focus on prints and print culture. I felt really supported by the faculty at Temple. The size of the program made it easy to develop solid mentor relationships with professors and some great friendships with fellow students as well. Being in an art history program that is part a renowned fine arts school—where people are creating and exchanging ideas in real time—was really appealing to me too.

Temple’s connection to Philadelphia and its arts and culture scene was also a huge influence, not only for access to exhibitions and arts institutions, but for internships and post-grad job applications, too. Being able to capitalize on that network really helped me get my foot in the door.

Tell us about how you ended up at the PMA! That must have been an exciting transition out of grad school.

It definitely was! I was very fortunate to have gotten a fellowship right out of school and to still be working at such a valuable institution now. I was selected as the Suzanne Andre Curatorial Fellow in Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, which is a two-year fellowship that I began in 2016. In grad school, I developed a love of works on paper—how they were made, how they functioned in society, who collected them—and this was my first museum position where I got to interact directly with these objects on a daily basis. Running the department’s busy study room, preparing for acquisition meetings, completing condition reports, taking courier trips—it was all vital training in the daily tasks of a curator.  

Monster Soup Commonly Called Thames Water, Being a Correct Representation of that Precious Stuff Doled out to Us, William Heath, 1794%2F95 - 1840 Gift of Mrs. William H. Horstmann, 1955.

Monster Soup Commonly Called Thames Water, Being a Correct Representation of that Precious Stuff Doled out to Us, William Heath, 1794%2F95 - 1840 Gift of Mrs. William H. Horstmann, 1955.

As part of your two-year fellowship you had the opportunity to curate an exhibition. How far in advance did you begin planning for it, what was the process like and what did it entail?

All in all, from concept to opening day, the show was in planning for the better part of a year and a half. I started throwing around potential exhibition ideas pretty much as soon as my fellowship began. I had a standing interest in caricature, having researched French satire for my masters’ thesis.  The museum’s holding of caricature, specifically British caricature, is so rich it just made sense to showcase these fantastically funny and perpetually relevant images.

I spent a long time looking through the more than 300 British caricatures in the museum’s collection. Early on, I made the choice to focus specifically on social satire, intentionally leaving out political works that might be less relevant (or understandable) to a modern audience today. What was so revealing, and actually pretty heartwarming, was how similar our collective sense of humor is now and then. What Londoners in the 1800s found funny and what we laugh about today really hasn’t changed that much. There are so many relatable threads running through the comedy of these centuries’ old prints—from anxieties about new technologies and environmental issues to the struggle to keep up with the latest fashion.

The Gout, James Gillray, c. 1745 - 1818. Purchased with the SmithKline Beckman Corporation Fund, 1949.

The Gout, James Gillray, c. 1745 - 1818. Purchased with the SmithKline Beckman Corporation Fund, 1949.

The show has been up for several months and has been extended until December, congratulations! What are you working on now or what's next?

Thank you! It has been so fun to share the exhibition with visitors. I love sneaking in the galleries and watching people, young and old, giggling at the prints!

I was fortunate enough to stay on at the PMA once my fellowship ended. Currently, I am a research and exhibition assistant in European Painting, working with curator Jenny Thompson on an upcoming Impressionist exhibition that will open in April 2019. In addition to the exhibition, we are planning a reinstallation of the PMA’s nineteenth-century permanent collection galleries too. Both are exciting projects that I’ve really enjoyed digging into!

*Photo credit for all exhibition installation images: Joseph Hu.

Cosmic Beach House by SP Projects

It's summer and SP Projects is heading to the Jersey Shore! Get ready for a magical season of out-of-this-world events and psychedelic art experiences at our Cosmic Beach House at The Outpost.

We are kicking off the season of fun on Friday the 13th with "Stank Rag's Very Fun And Extremely Enjoyable House Party" featuring the artwork of Richie Brown & Christine Mazur! Step through the portal and be transported into the realm of Stank Rag...a world where everything is a little bit (or a lot) wrong but it feels so right. Glitter mixes with grime in muddy rainbows of dreamy nightmares. What just happened? Was I even there? Where is there? Find out on Friday the 13th at the SP Projects Cosmic Beach House at The Outpost.

This immersive art experience will feature photography, a musical performance by DJ Oboy, and an opportunity for visitors to activate their nose chakras to receive a 'Stank Aura'  portrait revealed through a secret technology developed by Steve the Shaman.

Shimmering Zen, A new solo exhibition by James Stanford

James Stanford’s diverse practice includes photography, digital illustration, painting, and drawing. Stanford studied painting at the University of Washington (UW) (MFA) and the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) (BFA). Dedicated to creativity and the fine arts, he has taught at UNLV and UW, established the Smallworks Gallery, and curated exhibitions at various venues, including the Las Vegas Contemporary Arts Center.

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American artist James Stanford presents Shimmering Zen, an extraordinary new exhibition of Contemporary Buddhist art, featuring modern mandalas that premieres as part of Asian Art in London 2017 week, opening at 99 Kensington Church Street on Thursday 2 November through Saturday 11 November.

Using historic Las Vegas neon signage and architectural elements from the 1950s and 1960s, shot in the Mojave Desert, Stanford artfully creates digital montages, mesmerizing designs using unique newly developed purpose specific technology. Stanford’s group of intriguing digital reconfigurations convey and respond to the potency of the mandala as a symbol, and its influence and importance to Asian culture worldwide.

As a leading maker of contemporary mandalas, Stanford’s work is an interpretation of the ancient traditions of Buddhism, drawing from historic metaphor, Chinese fable, and the aesthetics of the Tibetan Mandala. Born and raised in Nevada, Stanford grew up in a household of educators. As a young man, after a transformative and spiritual moment at the Prado Museum in Madrid opened his mind to a higher consciousness, this new spirituality became firmly entwined with his creativity. With the advent of Apple software, the tools of technology merged with his ambitious thirst for spiritual growth and education. This led to Stanford’s personal commitment to Zen Buddhism and cemented his unique creative identity.

Stanford says of his work, “Las Vegas neon signage, which I see as the former jewels of the desert night, have come together with the use modern technology, enabling me to weave it all together using the artifice of perfect symmetry into a spiritual object of meditation.”

In Stanford’s conceptually complex and visually sumptuous work, the mandala offers contemplation for both spiritual and material realities. Using a mix of traditional photographic and digital techniques, Stanford’s works are made unique and compelling by vividly illuminated moving networks and layers.

Discussing his process, James Stanford says “When I take a picture of a derelict sign I already begin to see and find the patterns and shapes that will form the final piece. Once I get the image in the studio I begin to layer the patterns created, making sure to save the patterns I particularly like; I never lose a layer of work, I simply continue to build and modify those patterns that appeal to me.”

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This visually stunning and intricately constructed modern mandala series, entitled Indra’s Jewels, will be exhibited during Asian Art in London 2017. James Stanford is a featured participant during the Dealer Open Evening event to be held at the gallery on Saturday 4 November.

The exhibition will be complemented by the official launch of Stanford’s upcoming book of the same name, Shimmering Zen, at The London Library on Friday 3 November. The book is a compilation of 150 of Stanford’s works created over the last 15 years and published in a large format hardback. Shimmering Zen offers an insight into Stanford’s creative process and inspiration allied with original images of the signs, and accompanied by nostalgic tales of his Las Vegas life, including being on the set of Viva Las Vegas with Elvis Presley and Anne-Margaret.

The book Shimmering Zen (RRP £75) will be published by Ianthe Press Limited: London and launched with the exhibition. It will include essays by the artist and the curator, and a foreword by Jeff Rosen, Vice President, The Higher Learning Commission, Evanston, Illinois. Rosen’s book Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘Fancy Subjects’: Photographic allegories of Victorian identity and empire was published recently by Manchester University Press.

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The exhibition and selling show is curated by Elizabeth Herridge, art historian, author and former Managing Director of the Guggenheim Hermitage Museum, Las Vegas as well as publisher, Ianthe Press Limited: London.

Asian Art in London 2017 brings together over sixty of the world’s top dealers, major auction houses and museums for an annual ten day celebration of the finest in Asian art. Visitors will converge in London for the 20th anniversary edition offering gallery selling exhibitions, auctions, receptions, lectures and seminars.

The Shimmering Zen Exhibition runs from Thursday 2 November through Saturday 11 November 2017 at 99 Kensington Church St, London W8 7LN.

Opening times are as follows:
Monday - Friday 09.30am - 6.30pm
Saturday, 4 November 10am - 9pm
Sunday, 5 November 10am - 6pm
Saturday, 11 November 10am - 6pm

The book Shimmering Zen (RRP £75) will be launched on Friday 3 November 2017 at The London Library, 14 St James's Square, London SW1Y 4LG 6.30-8.30pm. The event is free but spaces are limited and advance booking is recommended. To attend please email rsvp@damsonpr.com.

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For further information or to RSVP please contact: Amelia Hubert or Anna Beketov, Damson PR on 0207 812 0645 or shimmeringzen@damsonpr.com

Bad Dads VIII: An art show tribute to the films of Wes Anderson

Spoke Art is proud to present the eighth annual Bad Dads exhibition - a dynamic showcase of over ninety artists from around the world celebrating the cinematic career of American director, Wes Anderson. Held at Talon Gallery in Portland, OR - Spoke is excited to bring this beloved show to the Pacific Northwest for the first time.

Started as a pop-up exhibition curated by gallery owner Ken Harman, Bad Dads has now blossomed through the years into a highly anticipated, memorable, and costumed art event. Gaining international recognition, the exhibition has evolved along with Anderson’s eight feature films (as well as numerous shorts and commercial features) giving each artist a well of inspiration to draw from.

Comprised of original painting and sculpture as well as a multitude of limited edition prints, Bad Dads VIII is a wide-ranging display of different styles and talents. Each artist was free to choose their own film for subject matter, resulting in a spectacular range of character portraits, highly detailed environments and iconic themes and motifs, prominent in each of Anderson’s films. Please join us for Bad Dads VIII, opening Friday, October 27th, with an opening night reception from 6pm-10pm. Guests attending in costume will receive a special gift and some artists will be in attendance. The exhibition will be on view through Sunday, October 29th, 2017.

Participating Artists: Eric Althin, Nicole Anguish, Zard Apuya, Ana Aranda, Derek Ballard, Brighton Ballard, Jonathan Bergeron, Ryan Berkley, Isaac Bidwell, Eric Bonhomme, Joshua Buddich, Ivonna Buenrostro, Sandi Callistro, Julian Callos, Keith Carter, Mar Cerda, James Charles, Matt Chase, Rodrigo Cifuentes, Codeczombie, Concepcion Studios, Benjamin Constantine, Camilla d'Errico, Max Dalton, Mai Ly Degnan, Tim Doyle, Matt Dye, Pippa Dyrlaga, Tom Eglington, Eron, Evanimal, Valentin Fischer, Jayde Fish, Fnnch, Blaine Fontana, Alex Garant, Sam Gilbey, Ian Glaubinger, Greg Gossel, Rebecca Green, Bill Green, Lauren Gregg, Dan Grissom, Nicole Gustafsson, Maryanna Hoggatt, Kevan Hom, Christine Hostetler, Primary Hughes, Charlie Immer, Ryan Inzana, Tim Jordan, Andrew Kolb, Conor Langton, Nan Lawson, Brin Levinson, Daliah Lina Ammar, Matt Linares, Adam Lister, Kemi Mai, Marni Manning, Harry Michalakeas, Guillaume Morellec, Reuben Negron, Jeany Ngo, Chelsea O'Byrne, Lily Padula, Anna Pan, Rich Pellegrino, Kat Philbin, Patrycja Podkościelny, Corinne Reid, Allison Reimold, Fernando Reza, Matt Ritchie, Miles Ritchie, Yohan Sacre, Leo Santamaria, Bennett Slater, Nick Stokes, Meghan Stratman, Lindsay Stripling, Dean Stuart, Maria Suarez Inclan, Halsey Swain, George Townley, Geoff Trapp, Liz Vowles, Chris Walker, Casey Weldon, Jan Willem. 

Recent Gallery Exhibitions in Amsterdam

This past weekend, several galleries in Amsterdam opened their doors on Saturday evening to celebrate the opening or closing of new and recent exhibitions. My first stop was to visit Ornis A. Gallery’s presentation of paintings by Bart Kok. His solo exhibition The Ideology of Pipe Smoking features works in intense, saturated tones that are often figural, but with a touch of humor and surrealism.

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Walking along the same street, the photographs in the window of Galerie Wouter van Leeuwen immediately caught my attention so I went in to inquire about the artist. Inside, not only did I find a beautiful show of Steve Fitch’s images capturing nostalgic and quintessentially ‘American’ landscapes, but also an impeccably curated collection of photographs from artists the gallery represents - including pieces from Michael Wolf’s Tokyo Compression series.

Steve Fitch:

Michael Wolf:

Also nearby is Stigter van Doesburg, which is currently featuring a solo show by Amie Dicke. According to the gallery press release: “The Liver Must Go To The Images brings together new works, which deploy printed matter as a sculptural material. Pictures pulled from various sources – including newspaper clippings, fashion magazines and art monographs – are broken down and built up into new image-objects wherein the partial obliteration of pictorial content becomes another mode of inscription.” Of particular interest were two smaller works tucked away in the back corner entitled My split self and My split self II, 2016.

Prelude: Forever Someone Else at GRIMM gallery’s Keizersgracht location (they also have a second outpost in Amsterdam and another space in New York) features a selection of works by Desiree Dolron. Their press release explains:

“The exhibition is a prelude to a larger body of work that will be the subject of a new monograph, scheduled for publication in 2020.

The title ‘Forever Someone Else’ refers to a book of selected poems by Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935), a writer, philosopher, mystic and astrologer. Pessoa employed as many as 75 alter egos, referred to as heteronyms, which he deployed at will to disseminate various philosophical and theoretical views.

This exhibition reveals a body of work from Dolron never previously exhibited. Included are various self-portraits in such distinct environments that each becomes an alter ego of the artist, functioning much like Pessoa’s heteronyms. The viewer witnesses the artist adapting, changing and evolving with each situation.”

Highlights in the exhibition included a striking self-portrait of the artist as well as a triptych of photographs.

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“Starting with works from 1991, the exhibition presents photographs taken in Pakistan and India, depicting Romani, the world’s oldest roaming nomad tribe. The earliest self-portrait in the exhibition features Dolron when she returned to the site in 1997, standing with an AK-47 amidst Taliban child soldiers.”

“Three individual images are shown on another wall; a speeding car, symbolizing the American dream, taken in Cuba (2002), a portrait of a beautiful girl from the Dominican Republic gazing melancholically into the camera (2001) [image], and a desert landscape shot at night in California (1990); the blacks intense, the light subdued. Together, these three images promote ideas of power and status.”

All images courtesy of the artists and their respective galleries. 

2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

On view through January of next year, the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial held at the beautiful Chicago Cultural Center in the heart of the city’s downtown area is a must-see. Walking through rooms of curated exhibitions, one encounters a range of work including photography, drawings, renderings, architectural models, installations and videos by architects and artists representing over 20 countries from across the globe. This year’s Artistic Directors were Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee of LA-based firm Johnston Marklee and the opening of the Biennial coincided with the international art fair EXPO Chicago.

Photo courtesy of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. 

Photo courtesy of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. 

“The Chicago Architecture Biennial 2017 will showcase the diversity of work from around the world to examine the underpinnings of this resurgence of historical interest. Titled “Make New History,” this second edition of the Biennial will focus on the efforts—across registers of building and discursive production—of contemporary architects to align their work with versions of history. Through the lens of architecture, the Biennial aims to examine the interplay of design and the broadening access to, as well as recall of, historical source material. In the realm of building practice—from new construction to adaptive reuse to conservation—it will investigate the ways in which the architect’s encounter with a site is, in fact, the act of interpreting and responding to a prior accumulation of state and government regulations, social conventions, and markers of personhood. Considerations for architecture in the context of history include the regulation and management of power and identity; what prevails and what does not; and how to recognize the significance of untold narratives. Now, more than ever, the assumptions embedded in cultural exempla and civic imaginaries require examination and discussion.”

The Architecture of Creative Miscegenation, Marshall Brown, Chicago, USA

The Architecture of Creative Miscegenation, Marshall Brown, Chicago, USA

Filip Dujardin studied History of Art at the University of Ghent, with a specialization in architecture, before studying photography at the Academy of Ghent. After training as a technical assistant for Magnum-photographer Carl De Keyzer, he started a professional collaboration with Frederik Vercruysse. In 2007, he established himself as an independent photographer for private and public clients in the fields of architecture, interior and product design. In 2008, he presented Fictions, his first series of independent artworks. On display at the Biennial were a selection of his works featuring some of Chicago's most iconic buildings. 

The Chicago Architecture Biennial is free and open to the public. For more information on planning your visit, click here.

For even more content from the Chicago Architecture Biennial, follow them on Instagram

Photo courtesy of the Chicago Architecture Biennial.

Photo courtesy of the Chicago Architecture Biennial.

"Back and Forth, by Collin van der Sluijs and Super A

"Back and Forth", exhibits the resulting chemistry of mind waves between artists Super A and Collin van der Sluijs.  The pairing yields a creative process just as natural as the influence of the moon on the tidal currents of the sea.  The two distinct styles push and pull in a harmony. Both artists have roots in the graffiti and street art culture of Holland. This background fueled their attitude towards fine art and surfaces in the work; a great balance between the rough and the smooth, the bitter and the sweet. In Super A’s new series of paintings which make up the collective work titled, "The Key to Success" tells a story of the negative and positive experiences in the battle for balance.  Super A challenges his audience with a dark sense of humor, and in the meantime, sparks a fire which triggers an acceptance and understanding of today's world. Collin’s latest series of works on paper are inspired by the time between making paintings.  A time where ideas and thoughts are free flowing, chaotic, and can yet be ever so slightly poetic.   

Be sure to join us for the opening reception of “Back and Forth” by Collin van der Sluijs and Super A, opening Thursday, June 8th at 7pm with First Amendment Gallery.  We are located at 1000 Howard St. in Downtown San Francisco.

What's Going on in Bangkok?

via Artconnect

Bangkok is the lively creative and cultural capital of the colorful Thailand. But does the art and museum scene of the town actually reflect the colorfulness of its country?

With its 8.2 million inhabitants on 1,569 square km, uncountable skyscrapers, busy markets and smelly restaurants, Bangkok is working on its role in the South Eastern artistic scene. The local environment appears undoubtedly diverse, as its numerous and varied districts.

The city hosts international artists, festivals and creative events, while building a stable inner and outer network.  At the same time, museums both devote to new contemporary research and exhibit sublime and very strange collections.

Leader of the more traditional path is probably the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre (BACC), located two steps away from Siam Square. Its look is consistent with the Western institutional directions, featuring  white curving space and spiral walkways with a Guggenheim effect. The space exhibits both national and international projects, artists and designers, performance and musical events. It is essentially a polyhedral space and, in a city that’s a huge open sky market like Bangkok, the first two floors of the building offer inevitably  also food and shops, among galleries. At the top floor curators propose rotating exhibitions. In February and March 2017, an interesting and pretty significant project displays the blacks and whites of the Brazilian artist Sebastião Salgado. A minimalistic set up is able to perfectly fit a curvilinear space with portraits of manual laborers, faces, hands, details, mob scenes and spaces, shooted from the 80s on.