Posts tagged Gallery
Spotlight: Stencil Exhibition at Hashimoto Contemporary
Eelus

Eelus

April 6th - April 27th, 2019

NEW YORK CITY - Hashimoto Contemporary is pleased to present Spotlight: Stencil, a group exhibition surveying contemporary stencil art. The exhibition features an international roster of artists who push the boundaries of the medium both inside and outside the studio.

Eelus is a UK based mural artist and screen printer. An early member of the street-art bastion Pictures on Walls, Eelus is a contemporary of Banksy, Shepard Fairey, Hush, and many more working in stencils.

Jana & JS are an Austro-French duo whose work merge their shared passion for photography and urban environments. Inspired by the city, its architecture and inhabitants, their work focuses on urban landscapes, portraits and details of architecture.

Joe Lurato,

Joe Lurato,

Joe Iurato is a multidisciplinary artist whose works are built on a foundation of stencils and aerosol. Falling somewhere in between simplistic and photorealistic, his multi-layer stencils offer a distinctly clean and illustrative aesthetic.

Mando Marie

Mando Marie

Mando Marie is known for her graphic work, which uses images of tales and repetition of motifs to inform the compositions of her paintings. Her works play with elements of both the spooky and nostalgia.

OakOak is an anonymous artist who transforms everyday objects, utilizing them for his cleverly placed imagery, creating works that are a combination of humor and urban poetry.

Oak Oak

Oak Oak

Penny finds inspiration in everyday objects and often overlooked ephemera, but currency is the most prominent recurring theme in his work. He has received global critical acclaim for his hand cut, extremely detailed stencil work.

This exhibition will be on view through Saturday, April 27th. A limited edition 7-layer screen print titled Red Dress by Eelus is scheduled to be released in conjunction with the exhibition and will be available in person at the opening. For more information, additional images, or exclusive content, please email nyc@hashimotocontemporary.com

Solo Show of Harlem artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London | April 1-13, 2019
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FACTION Art Projects is delighted to present a solo show of Harlem-based artist Stan Squirewell at Gallery 8, London. Following an exhibition of Squirewell’s work at FACTION’s Harlem space, the FACTION team is bringing him to London for a display of multilayered collages, which through elements of mythology, sacred geometry and science, tackle themes of race and memory. This marks Squirewell’s first solo show outside the US. A Private View of the exhibition will be held on April 2, 2019 from 6-9pm.

Squirewell’s newest works, which have evolved over two or three years of archival study and exploration, are heavily influenced by a recent revelation of his paternal ancestry.

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Squirewell says:

‘For most of my life I believed my family were African Americans who had arrived to the US on slave ships, and it wasn’t until my twenties that I discovered my true heritage, that they were indigenous Americans. As a teacher working closely with the national curriculum I constantly see how history, even now, is curated. My art attempts to rewrite these assumed histories. The beauty of the works capture the viewer, but it’s the ugly that intrigues and leads them to look deeper.’

Rediscovering his ancestry has prompted Squirewell to question his identity, particularly in the western hemisphere. It also speaks to his battle with the omnipresent slavery narrative, when he himself comes from a black family that is not believed to have a history of slavery. Through portraiture he challenges histories and presents a more empowering narrative for black identity, seeking to change the terminology around the very word ‘black’.

The portraits have a16th, 17th and 18th century aesthetic with a contemporary awareness. The depicted figures are both real historical figures and fictitious characters that are in some way related to the artist. Through demonstrating the misrepresentations of history, they critique what we colloquially describe as fact. Each artwork is complete only after he ceremoniously burns both the collage and its hand carved frames which include motifs and markings from ancient indigenous American and African cultures.

The titles of Stan Squirewell’s works reference particular moments in our shared history. One work entitled ‘Willendorf’, is inspired by the prehistoric female figure of ‘Venus of Willendorf’, while another, ‘Amerindian’ refers to the ‘$5 Indians’ - those who, 125 years ago, paid for falsified documents that proved them to be Native American.

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About Stan Squirewell:

Stan Squirewell was born and raised in Washington, DC and currently lives and works in Harlem, New York. His artistic training began at the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. Since graduating he has continued his tutelage under many of DC’s legends including artists Michael Platt and Lou Stovall. Squirewell, is a painter, photographer, installation and performance artist. His work is multilayered and his subject matter tackles themes such as: race and memory through mythology, sacred geometry and science. He draws his inspiration from theory books, science fiction movies and novels, avant-garde jazz and indigenous storytelling. He is a (2007 MFA) graduate of the Hoffberger School of Painting where he studied with the late, Grace Hartigan. Squirewell is the first winner of the Rush Philanthropic and Bombay Sapphire Artisan series. He has performed with Nick Cave (SoundSuits) at the National Portrait Gallery and Jefferson Pinder with G-Fine Arts. He is privately and publicly collected, his works are in the Reginald Lewis Museum, the Robert Steele Collection and recently acquired by the Smithsonian for the African American Museum (2015.) Squirewell is currently exhibited as part of ‘Fashioning the body’ at projects+gallery in St. Louis alongside Bisa Butler, Soly Cissé, Renee Cox, David Antonio Cruz, Kenturah Davis, Hassan Hajjaj, Basil Kincaid, Mario Moore, Chris Ofili, Fahamu Pecou, Katherine Simóne Reynolds, Jacolby Satterwhite, Mickalene Thomas, and Kehinde Wiley.

About FACTION Art Projects:

FACTION is a flexible collective, from the team behind the hugely successful Gallery 8 and Coates & Scarry in London, who have created a unique model for artists and gallerists to work together. FACTION addresses the changing market place and the erosion of the traditional art market, where galleries were gatekeepers for artists. FACTION provides artists with promotion and opportunity to access collectors and a wider audience, with all the support of a gallery but without the constraints of the traditional model. They aim to deliver a program of artists that is diverse and inclusive. FACTION launched in February 2018 at Gallery 8 in Harlem, New York and since then has become strongly imbedded in the Striver’s Row community and a highlight of Harlem’s cultural scene.

For more information please contact Anna Beketov, anna.beketov@damsonpr.com, +44 (0)20 7812 0645

PxP Contemporary: Sell Your Work Through a New Gallery and Online Platform

Listen to the new podcast Q&A with Kat and Alicia answering common questions about the new project. We talk about why we started the gallery, what we are looking for, how to submit work, best practices and more!

Sell Your Work Through a New Gallery and Online Platform

PxP Contemporary is pleased to announce an open call for emerging artists looking to sell work via a new online gallery and curatorial platform, launching in 2019. 

Working with Create! Magazine over the years has introduced co-founders Alicia Puig and Ekaterina Popova to incredible artists and collectors alike, and we are thrilled to be connecting the two through PxP Contemporary. Our gallery will feature rotating exhibitions along with themed collections and we are planning additional curated projects as well as art fairs for the future. Initially, we will be seeking to represent a small group of approximately ten artists. These artists’ works will be promoted during the launch of our first group show and then regularly via our website, email newsletters, solo or group exhibitions, and social media channels.

Information and eligibility 

  • Artists 18+ working in any medium are welcome to submit work that is currently available for sale and is priced between $100-$2000 retail value. 

  • A fine art degree is not required to participate in our open call. 

  • Please only enter artworks that are not reserved by any other gallery or booked for exhibitions within a six month period. If work is selected by our curatorial team, artists will be contacted for additional information, images and also be asked to sign a contract. 

  • Gallery artists should prepare quality photographs of each work that will be featured on our website, including images of the sides and details, in order for potential buyers to have a complete visual representation of your piece. 

  • On any works sold via our platform, the gallery will charge a 30% commission and the artist will receive 70%. 

  • The buyer of the artwork will cover shipping costs based on a calculated formula of weight and the intended destination. 

  • Artists will then be responsible for properly packing the sold work according to our specific instructions and industry standards as well as taking it to a postal location. 

  • Artwork will be sold as is with no refunds (hence the emphasis on accurate, high-resolution images of your work) and artists will be paid promptly upon the buyer receiving the piece. 

  • All art will be insured when shipping to protect both parties. 

  • Works will be offered unframed unless it is a part of the piece or is requested by the buyer. In this case, we will coordinate the extra costs with the client. 

PLEASE PREPARE THE FOLLOWING FOR YOUR APPLICATION:

  • Artist Statement and Artist Biography 

  • Artist Resume

  • Up to ten (10) images of completed past artworks

  • Please submit only jpg files

  • Images should be no more than 5MB in file size

  • File Name: Images should be titled in the following manner: Last Name, First Name, a number corresponding to the image description sheet (For example: DoeJane01; DoeJane02; etc.)

  • Annotated Image List: Title of work, Dimensions, Medium, Year of Completion, Price

  • A non-refundable submission fee of $10 for up to ten images is required

 

We will continue to review applications on a rolling basis, but the deadline for the initial round of represented artists and the first group exhibition will be May 1, 2019.

 Thank you and we look forward to reviewing your work. Email questions to: alicia@createmagazine.com

Website coming soon: www.pxpcontemporary.com

Interview with James Oliver, Artist and Owner of James Oliver Gallery

James Oliver is a painter whose precise visual language pushes the tradition of twentieth century abstraction into a contemporary context. Oliver is a conceptually driven formalist whose work is inspired by his dreams and emotional states, which he abstracts into an undetermined and subjective viewing experience by emphasizing line, color, and form. Even as Oliver turns to a figurative practice in recent series, rendering cultural icons like chopper bikes, Pontiac Firebirds, and his childhood poodle in detailed line drawings, these representations similarly evoke broadly accessible affects abstracted from his mental landscape.

Tell me a little bit about yourself and your art.

I'm known as a near-minimalist painter that first got attention working abstractly. Now I'm getting known more as being a painter who delves into representational and figurative works. I have been working on a series of paintings of muscle cars and vintage motorcycles and completely enjoying it. I use minimal color in my works and am known for my line-work.

What inspired you to start your gallery? Give us a little history of the beautiful exhibition space in Philadelphia.

I have been presented a huge space for my studio practice. I quickly realized that the space was bigger than the amount I would really need. Shortly after receiving the keys to the space, I showed it to some close friends and most determined I should open an art gallery; the landlord also mentioned this. I quickly concluded with their input and my own background in the arts, that I can do this! So, long story short, JOG (James Oliver Gallery) was born. We have featured many great artists from the local talent pool to artists from near and far at our gallery that generally showcases works that may be on the minimalist and clean side, both abstract and figurative. All mediums. Over the course of the years, people have mentioned that maybe we should expand within the building at some. An opportunity arose in 2017 to take over the second floor, and we would make this a particularly unique endeavor. This all came about with the partnering through partnering up with our neighbor, Bryan Hoffman, owner of Hoffman Design Group. His company specializes in interior landscape and does business throughout the city. We decided in this partnership to "marry" horticulture with contemporary art. The artwork we feature at Hot-Bed would be a plant, animal, or science-driven exhibitions. So far so good!

Over these years I had the good fortune of working with some great interns and assistants. Most notably, Aubrey Loftus who first interned here for a year and then became staff and now is director of both galleries. She is a very talented artist and curator/director that has helped bring us into our biggest phase.

How has running a gallery influenced your own art making?

As one might imagine, being surrounded by great quality works over these months and years has uniquely inspired and driven me to create and develop my best works to date. My recent series of works was inspired not only by being around the gallery and the art scene but from input by visitors and fellow artists and their encouragement to develop the series. Lovin' it!

Sacred Geometry: Interview with Phyllis Gorsen and Paula Cahill
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Phyllis Gorsen

I have created a series of multi-canvased paintings that describe how we are all connected together by having elements of everyday life in common. I use symbols in both visual and written language as depictions of these commonalities highlighting the connections created by their universality despite varying perceptions. I use a combination of abstraction and representation in the work.These paintings explore connection in two ways: larger multi-canvased compositions that are broad symbolic illustrations of elements of common human experiences, and smaller “couples” paintings that represent two universal elements symbolically paired together in written language. These works are more specific in nature. 
My paintings are intended to move the eye using energetic patterns, movement and vibrancy. My hope is that viewer is captivated by the visual allure of the surface to allow for a slow unveiling of the meaning of the work – which is that we all connected by sharing many of these human experiences.

-Phyllis Gorsen

Tell me about your creative journey so far. 

I have been painting most of my life, primarily figures.  What I loved most about figurative work is that many times it contains the thing that is most basic to all of us. Race, gender identity, religion, etc. inform our experiences and perspectives and thus there are multitudes of viewpoints stemming from that. But, even with these differences, there are overarching similarities that we are share. That is the place that I want to put the emphasis on. As an artist, my work has always been about connection. I try to portray the human aspects that are intrinsic to all people regardless of our differences.  

When I went back to school and got my MFA in 2014 from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, I studied the figurative painters that I loved so much, mainly the Bay Area Figurative Painters like David Park and Richard Diebenkorn. It was then that I started to concentrate on figurative work that captures the patterns of everyday life, but I never made my work autobiographical. I was always much more interested in those spaces that are common to everyone. And although the figure was a catalyst for my work, between the use of color, collage, and pattern, there has always been a strong abstract component. After I graduated, I started to play around in the studio thinking more about the literal interpretation of patterns of everyday life. That’s when I took the turn into geometric abstract work.

As I delved deeper into the abstract elements, both in subject matter and execution, I began portraying components of everyday life in symbolic terms. I created paintings mimetic of the human experience without the use of figures. Most people don’t realize that my paintings contain symbols, I think mostly because I try not to make them too obvious. I prefer a slow unveiling of the meaning behind the work. I do fuse abstraction and representation within many of my paintings as long as I feel they describe the various facets of our commonalities. Some of these elements are recognizable and others are symbolic interpretations of components such as language, technology, nature, culture, etc. Often, I use lines to bridge these symbols together, illustrating how they connect us together. Linguistically, I am exploring the use of symbolism through my titles. These play a critical role in telling the story of each piece and drive the composition of some paintings. All of my work has a high degree of vibrancy and vibration that is a constant within my practice.

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What inspired you to create the work you are including in the exhibition at James Oliver Gallery?


My works in the show contain pieces that are more complex and have various visual components and meanings, as well as paintings that are more distilled and simplified. In addition to the complex paintings that are attached to multiple canvases, I wanted to include paintings that were separate but related. So I have works that are both interconnected such as “Essence and Pursuit” and outwardly connected such as “Of a Circular Nature…”- which are a set of four paintings? It was an exciting exploration in the idea of connection to depict it internally and externally. All of the work is painted on circular canvases or within circular spaces. The circle to me is beautiful in that there are no defined edges. They feel like complete bodies to me and allow me to investigate the idea of connection in a more fluid way.


What are some ongoing themes or ideas you have been exploring within your paintings?

As I mentioned before, I focus on how the commonality of shared patterns connects people together by using symbolism- both abstract and representational. I personally feel that the most powerful works are the ones that combine visceral sensory experiences with fundamental content underneath. I like making the surfaces of my paintings beautiful with the hope that the viewer is enticed enough to uncover the underlying message of human connection. In “Interweave”, the idea was to illustrate that regardless of our differences, people are internally woven together creating a society. In “Interlink #1-12”, the 12 separate canvases each represents a microcosm of a society that is linked to ones surrounding it. In “Essence and Pursuit”, there are eight canvases representing elements of humanity. From the top left panel going across and down, they are: Connection, Essence (red rings emanating outward), diverse populations of people moving together and apart (top middle), Vegetation, Geography, Technology (bottom middle), Knowledge, and Cities.


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What can visitors expect from this exhibition?  

Sacred Geometry describes the patterns found in nature from the most minuscule particles to the greater cosmos. We obviously took on the title of the show “Sacred Geometry” with some poetic license. The idea behind the show was to exhibit work that had geometric abstract elements that also incorporated the meaning behind it.

When you walk into Hot-Bed Gallery, the viewer is immersed in a room of vibrant pattern and color. It really is visually exciting due to the interplay of color and movement from our work. I was really happy to be exhibiting with Paula Cahill because I am an admirer of her work and I felt that our paintings would fit well together. Hopefully, the audience will be seduced by the luminous surfaces to want to know more about the paintings.

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Paula Cahill

Is it possible to pinpoint when straight and curved lines were invented? The contours of ancient rock paintings give us organic lines and line is evident in the motifs of early Greek vessels and Egyptian Funerary art. Renaissance artists were lauded for their invention of perspective, a system contrived of straight lines that extend to infinity. Modernists isolated and formalized gestural line as subject. I strive to extend this conversation by painstakingly mixing and repeatedly laying down up to 100 gradients of color in my attempts to contemporize line.

- Paula Cahill

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Tell me about your creative journey so far. 

I studied figurative painting for many years before transitioning to complex abstract paintings. While in Graduate School, one of my critics looked at my figurative work and told me that if I wanted to paint flesh better, I should paint a fish. So, I did. When he came back, he said: "That's a pretty good fish, you should paint another one." Apparently, my other critics also thought that I should paint fish and they told me so. I never figured out if they thought I painted great fish or lousy flesh, but I kept painting fish. Pretty soon, I became interested in the way fish were moving in my aquarium and I began tracking their movements with line. I used those lines to make my first linear abstract paintings.

Being an abstract painter was like being a kid in a candy store for me. I wanted to experiment and try every type of abstract painting. I experimented for about six years. When I decided to get serious about showing my work, I asked friends for advice. They basically told me that I was a gallerist's nightmare! I needed to settle down to create a cohesive body of work. That's when I returned to the lines and I’ve been developing this body of work for almost two years. I’m glad that I made this commitment because the work has become more precise and complex. I’ve moved beyond fish and have used a variety of catalysts for the paintings. Art historical reference, movement, music, geometry, and memories have all been sources for my paintings.

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What inspired you to create the work you are including in the exhibition at James Oliver Gallery?

To me line is everything! Line is everywhere and it has been with us forever. I often wonder if we can pinpoint when straight and curved lines were invented. The contours of ancient rock paintings give us organic lines and line is evident in the motifs of early Greek vessels and Egyptian Funerary art.Renaissance artists were lauded for their invention of perspective, a system contrived of straight lines that extend to infinity. Modernists isolated and formalized gestural line as a subject. I strive to extend this conversation by painstakingly mixing and repeatedly laying down up to 100 gradients of color in my attempts to contemporize line.

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What can visitors expect from this exhibition?  

My new 2019 paintings will be exhibited for the first time in Sacred Geometry at Hot Bed. Geometry and historical reference are heavily weighted in this work. I think that viewers will be surprised to see some color shifts and compositional changes.

California Artists: Brea Art Gallery Call for Entries

This annual juried exhibit showcases artwork from all over the state of California. MICA strives to highlight artists in all stages of their careers and offers them a chance to compete for a number of awards, including the coveted solo show opportunity. This regional show features artwork from an extensive variety of mediums and explores creative movements happening in California. 

Entry Deadline: February 28, 2019

Petites Luxures
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NEW YORK CITY - Hashimoto Contemporary is pleased to present Petites Luxures in Big Apple, a solo exhibition by French illustrator Petites Luxures. Petites Luxures in Big Apple will be the artists inaugural solo exhibition at Hashimoto Contemporary, in which he explores themes of sexuality and intimacy through his signature minimalist style.

Through the use of minimal mark making focusing on the simplicity of fluid lines, Petites Luxure’s work delves into the intimacy of human relationships and love. French phrases and humorous witticism’s act as clues
to the often seemingly unfinished scenes, leaving the viewer to imagine the rest of the story. From a pair of hands unbuckling a belt to innumerable hands intertwined and entangled across bodies, the images culminate in a delicate and playful portrayal of desire and lust.

For Petites Luxures in the Big Apple, the artist will be exhibiting over 25 new ink on paper drawings, and will be exhibiting mixed media sculptural works and installations for the first time ever.

About the exhibition, Petites Luxures states, “Whatever the medium is, the purpose is always to play with the viewer’s eye, to make the spectator search for the rest of the story and to create playful and interactive erotic scenes.”

Please join us Saturday, January 5 from 6pm - 8pm for the opening reception of Petites Luxures In Big Apple. The artist will be in attendance. A limited edition archival pigment print of L’Éventail is scheduled to be released in conjunction with the exhibition and will be available in person at the opening.

This exhibition will be on view through Saturday, January 26, 2019. For more information, additional images, or exclusive content, please email us at nyc@hashimotocontemporary.com

Max Cole 'Crosswinds" at Larry Becker Contemporary Art
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If you find yourself in Philadelphia before the end of the year, we highly suggest stopping by Larry Becker Contemporary Art to see their current exhibition. To be honest, it wasn’t yet on my radar when I decided to go gallery hopping on a Saturday in November. I happened to begin chatting with an artist sitting a co-op space nearby and he urged me to go over and take a look. ‘Crosswinds’ presents paintings and works on paper by American artist Max Cole. I won’t give away too much here since the owners are more than happy to tell you about this incredible artist and her work - so go see some great art and say hi to their adorable gallery cat!

Max Cole
’Crosswinds’
On view Nov 10 - Dec 29, 2018

You can follow the gallery on Facebook & Instagram.

Max Cole’s paintings suggest an approach to infinity through the use of vertical repetitive lines, a record of intense focus that is said to contain energy as embedded content. The artist describes this process, which she has worked in for over 50 years, as meditative. Though sometimes compared to the work of Agnes Martin, the similarities between the practices are superficial. “There is no other way to produce the work except for a depth of engagement requiring the abandonment of self," Cole has explained, "and this process opens the door to infinity enabling reach outside the physical. For me art must transcend the material.” Born in 1937 in Hodgeman County, KS, she received her BFA from Fort Hays State University in Kansas and her MFA from the University of Arizona in Tucson. Influenced by the Suprematist works of Kazimir Malevich during the late 1950s, she began producing paintings which reflected on time with simple forms. The artist lives and works in California. Today, Cole’s works are held the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, among others.

Artist biography adapted from Artnet.

Order the Art Miami 2018 Edition!

Create! Magazine Issue 12 | Art Miami 2018 Edition 

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Please allow 2-3 weeks for domestic delivery and 3-5 weeks internationally. 

(Ships after on or December 9th)

Pre-sale price valid until November 30, 2018

 

180+ ad-free pages of interviews and features with established, mid-career and emerging contemporary artists for you to discover and be inspired by!

Issue 12 Contents


On The Cover 

 

Madison Parker

 

Interviews



Waves, Waterscapes and Wanderlust 

Interview with Artist Nina Brooke 

By Alicia Puig 

 

Postgraduate Plans 

Interview with Emerging Artist Rosabel Rosalind Kurth-Sofer 

By Alicia Puig 

 

James Bullough 

The Voices of Street Artists 

By Christina Nafziger 

 

Edra Soto 

Creating Community Through Artistic Practice 

By Christina Nafziger 

 

Reimagined and Remembered 

Interview with Charlotte Keats 

By Ekaterina Popova 

 

Standing up for Women Artists 

Interview with Liezel Strauss, Art Girl Rising 

By Ekaterina Popova 

 

A Glimpse into Another’s World 

Interview with Anna Shukeylo 

By Ekaterina Popova 

 

Spot on 

Neo-Pointillism by Pj Linden 

By Alicia Puig 

 

Adam D. Miller and Devon Oder Creating a Gallery Through an Artist’s Perspective 

By Christina Nafziger 

 

The Beauty and Complexity of the Natural World 

Interview with Alonsa Guevara 

By Ekaterina Popova



Art Miami Fairs Highlight Exhibitors

 

A unique perspective from galleries exhibiting at Art Miami Fairs 2018

 


Artists Selected by Guest Curator, Kaly Scheller-Barrett, Associate Director of Hashimoto Contemporary

 

Stacey Beach

Isabel Chun

Ben Dallas

Scout Dunbar

Lesley Gold

Raul Gonzalez

Erica Green

Elizabeth Jung

Thomas Kelley III

Lydia Kinney

Huanying Koh

Forrest Lawson

Megan Magill

Amy Meissner

Aly Morgan

Hedda Neelsen

Yuria Okamura

Madison Parker

Anastasia Parmson

Diane Pribojan

Sara Allen Prigodich

Meganne Rosen

Molly Scannell

Lindsey Schulz

Max Seckel

Val Shamma

Anne Cecile Surga

Andrea Taylor

Anna Teiche

Sophie Treppendahl

Charlotte Urreiztieta 

Jimmy Viera

Ellie Ji Yang

Madeline Zappala

Angie Zielinski

Spotlight Artist

 

Andrew Salgado

 

Highlight Artists

 

Andre Bogart Szabo

Valentina Sarfeh

Going The Extra Mile: Career Decisions, Networking and Standing Out From The Crowd With Alicia Puig
Alicia reading  Create! Magazine  in Amsterdam

Alicia reading Create! Magazine in Amsterdam

Alicia Puig is an art historian who has worked for several notable galleries, museums, and nonprofit organizations throughout her career and who is very experienced in marketing for the arts and exhibition development. She was a practicing artist for many years, but after starting her first gallery job managing a small exhibition space for student art, she soon realized that she loved helping young artists put together what was often their first professional quality solo show more than creating her own work. Since then, she has continued to seek out new opportunities for creative professionals like herself and has connected many artists to their next exhibitions, published features, or sales.

On this episode, Alicia Puig shares how she figured out her unique career path in the art world and what helped her make the difficult decision about which one of her passions to pursue.

Alicia has been able to carve out a place for herself in the arts by practicing resilience and handling rejection with grace. She shares tips on how to stick out from the crowd and outsmart your competition when looking for opportunities. This episode also offers effective networking strategies and offers tips for artists on working with galleries.

If you are at a crossroads in your career or are excited about making it as a gallerist, curator or work with major art institutions, this one is for you!

Painting on a photograph by Alicia Puig (discussed in this episode)

Painting on a photograph by Alicia Puig (discussed in this episode)

Paintings Alicia Puig completed during her undergrad at Kutztown University

Alex Eckman-Lawn and Seth Clark at Paradigm Gallery

Two upcoming solo shows by Pennsylvania-based artists, Alex Eckman-Lawn and Seth Clark, opening this Friday, October 26 at Paradigm Gallery.

Fragmentation by collage artist, Seth Clark, feature new multimedia works. Fragmentation is a continuation of the artist's ongoing exploration of abandoned, deteriorating architecture; however, this featured series is less representational than his previous works. Derived most notably from found paper and wood, Clark's ambitious, intricate and delicately-worked mixed media collages aim to represent the fragmented and complex nature of architecture in decline, what he refers to as the beauty of decay.

Recessive by visual artist Alex Eckman-Lawn is the artist's first solo show with the gallery. Eckman-Lawn's latest multi-layered, hand-cut paper collages continue the artist's ongoing exploration of his anxieties and fears, recurrent themes of interest particularly focused upon the body and the weight of family history. His collages, at once precise and sure-handed, have a sulfurous glow, a magical aura seemingly rising dark and ominous from the hinterland of his mind.

About Paradigm Gallery

Paradigm Gallery + Studio® exhibits contemporary artwork from around the world with a focus on Philadelphia-based artists. Established February 2010, the gallery began as a project between co-founders and curators, Jason Chen and Sara McCorriston, as a space in which to create artwork, to exhibit the work of their peers, and to invite the members of the community to create and collect in a welcoming gallery setting. To this day the gallery still aims to welcome all collectors, from first time to lifelong, and continues to support accessible work that welcomes a wide audience.

The Courage to Enjoy It: Podcast Interview with Andrew Salgado
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On this episode of Art and Cocktails, Kat interviews contemporary artist Andrew Salgado about the inspiration behind his recent exhibition at Angell Gallery, his approach to painting, bringing pleasure back to art-making, the importance of rest for artists and much more.

Andrew Salgado is a leading young figurative painter with over a dozen sold-out international exhibitions, including London, New York, Zagreb, Miami, Cape Town, and Basel. In 2017, Salgado was the youngest artist to ever receive a survey-exhibition at The Canadian High Commission in London, accompanied by a 300-page monograph, both of which were entitled TEN

“The large scale, gestural paintings of Andrew Salgado explore concepts relating to the destruction and reconstruction of identity – a process that he views as re-considering the conventions of figurative painting through a pursuit toward abstraction. Salgado questions the nature of identity and even the act of painting itself as something monstrous, allegorical, or symbolic. Incorporating Classical archetypes alongside a wildly inventive approach to his chosen media, Salgado’s work defies categorization. Recent works include collage, mixed-media, and even hand-dyed and hand-stitched linen and canvas. ”I am interested in how my paintings operate independently from their literal figurative foundation, and how they might deconstruct through colour choices, reduction of forms, and triumph of materiality to become something altogether otherworldly.”

- Beers London

Andrew’s new exhibition at Angell Gallery, Toronto:

BLUE RAINBOW

ANDREW SALGADO

October 4–27, 2018

"Blue Rainbow" Exhibition by Andrew Salgado at Angell Gallery

ANGELL GALLERY is pleased to present  Blue Rainbow, the first solo exhibition in Toronto by London, U.K.-based Canadian artist Andrew Salgado. Featuring a suite of new paintings by the internationally exhibited artist, the show runs from Thursday, Oct. 4 to Saturday, Oct. 27, with an opening reception with the artist on Thursday, Oct. 4 at 7:00 p.m.

Blue is associated with the sky and the sea - vast spaces often used as metaphors for freedom and inspiration, or signifiers of tranquility and calmness. Perhaps this is why Andrew Salgado chose this colour as part of the title of his exhibition Blue Rainbow. After years of making work in which the political was very personal, Salgado's new paintings find him unburdening. "My practice was being weighted down by my own history," he explains. "I have been vocal about LGBT issues, but I think I'm cooling down."

Salgado insists that his latest work isn't political; however, with the rise of right-wing attitudes in many parts of the world - and the anti-LGBT sentiments that often accompany them - producing positive representations of gay people can be read as a political act. Salgado, who has been the target of hate crimes, dealt directly with his experiences in earlier works such as Bloody Faggot (2011). That painting represented what he was going through physically and emotionally at the time. In 2017, when he mounted a solo exhibition at the Canadian High Commission in London - making him the youngest artist to do so - Bloody Faggot was a central work in the show.

Salgado has closed the door on that period of his life. Now, he wants his work to be about the sense of joy and discovery that he experiences while creating paintings, and he hopes that visitors to his shows feel the same when viewing them. "The process, the joy, the colours, the feelings I get ... I want those to be enough for me, and I want them to be enough for viewers," he says. "I've learned to stop talking about what my work means because what others bring to it is just as important as my intentions."

Salgado's figures throughout Blue Rainbow are situated within vibrant and textured environments that suggest the out-of-doors: quiet moments on azure beaches, walking through a garden or contemplating a cobalt sky at dusk. Serenity, freedom and expansiveness inform the paintings; they serve as meditative yet irreverent rejoinders to the socially and politically proscribed lives that people too often feel hemmed in by. "A line from the Bjork song Big Time Sensuality - 'it takes courage to enjoy it' - really hit me recently," says Salgado. "I've heard this song a million times, but suddenly I was like: Oh my god, that's so true. So, this show is me, learning to enjoy." 

- Bill Clarke




7th Exhibition Benefit 2018 Exhibition by Bridgette Mayer Gallery

The Bridgette Mayer Gallery in partnership with exhibition space host, Arts + Crafts Holdings, is pleased to organize its 7th Benefit Exhibition supporting Friends of the Rail Park, a nonprofit organization that is transforming unused highline railway tracks into vibrant public spaces in Philadelphia.

From September 7th to October 5th, the exhibition will be the largest yet in presenting paintings, photographs, collages, and mixed media from over 200 curated artists encompassing various styles and techniques. Artist’s works will be featured on either 10”x10” panels or 24”x24” panels.

This benefit will help kick start Phase II of Friends of the Rail Park three-phase plan to renovate train tracks into green space spanning multiple neighborhoods of Philadelphia. Each work will be sold for $500 for 10” x 10” panels or $2,000 for 24” x 24” panels done by esteemed and renowned artists. This exhibition is a wonderful opportunity for established collectors and new collectors to purchase high quality art at amazing prices - some of the artworks in the exhibition retail for $5,000 to $20,000. 25% of the proceeds will benefit The Rail Park.

Learn more and visit the show:

Preview of select works:


"Alla Prima" Exhibition by Kristen Margiotta

Delaware artist, Kristen Margiotta presents: "Alla Prima, an exhibition of her portraits presented by the work of her subjects", opens this Friday, 9/14, 6-10pm at RH Gallery, in Hockessin, DE. Kristen is a Delaware based oil painter, illustrator, and art instructor, who created 18 "alla prima" portrait paintings in March, from live models in her studio. These portraits, and a few more, will be on display to the public at this show, along with artwork created by her subjects, as well as live music by staples in the Delaware music scene for decades. This show is a tribute to the creative talent in our tiny state.

To learn more about Kristen and this project, please visit www.kristenmargiotta.com