Posts tagged Landscape
Free and Intuitive: Interview with Lauren Mycroft
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Lauren Mycroft is a Canadian painter whose abstract works reference organic shapes using complex layers and staining. Using a contemporary palette and methodical layering technique, Mycroft creates process-driven artwork that feels both fresh and familiar. The compositions are created freely and intuitively, learned through years of practice and formal art training. Inspired by memory of place, Mycroft reflects on our emotional attachment and not specific locales. Through her unique palette and fields of stains, Mycroft offers the viewer a sense of nostalgia and elicits a personal response based on their own experiences with the landscape.

Mycroft studied at Vancouver Island University and Emily Carr University of Art and Design, and now exhibits regularly on the Canadian West Coast.

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In your artist statement, you talk about how your practice is process driven. How did you develop your process?

My process was developed over years of experimentation and working towards the goal of painting without developing an attachment to the end result. I have always enjoyed painting with a fluid medium. However, something clicked for me when I started working with high flow paints. This new medium caused my process to change dramatically, as I started pouring liquid paint over the canvas rather than applying with a brush.

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What is your favorite part about your intuitive practice?

Painting intuitively as opposed to painting with a specific outcome in mind challenges my need to control small details and allows me to problem solve creatively in the moment. Although it can feel overwhelming approaching a canvas in this way, once I overcome the compositional challenges of a painting, I am far more excited by the result than had I approached it with a predetermined outcome.

You also talk in your statement about being inspired by the memory of the place. When and how did this idea become an inspiration in your work?

The process of painting landscapes is something that has allowed me to reflect upon my childhood, as I moved around a lot in my life. Leaving the imagery abstracted and void of representative details allows the viewer to create their attachment to the work. For me, each piece is very personal; however it is not based on a specific locale, it is more representational of time.

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How does the idea of memory drive and come through in your work?

I would say the idea of memory drives the mood of my work and dictates my color palette and the boldness or softness or a painting. That, combined with the indistinct forms, allow viewers to apply their memory and attachment to a piece which creates a connection for the collector.

Can you tell us a little about your color palette? Is the palette premeditated for each piece or do you work intuitively there as well?

I often start with an idea of a palette or a couple of colors; however, it changes as the painting develops.

Can you share a piece of advice you have received that you think our readers would benefit from hearing?

I don’t remember where I read this, however, the simple, yet powerful statement, “walk towards your fear” has greatly impacted how I approach creating such personal work every day and how I navigate this career. I also have a note on my studio wall reminding myself not to allow the work to become precious; this keeps it fun and experimental and will enable me to make my best work.

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What has been the best part of your artistic career thus far?

I keep surprising myself with what I’m able to accomplish as a self-employed person (even the fact that I’m self-employed is a surprise to me) who is also raising two little humans! There’s a sense of pride and newfound confidence that I’ve acquired with each hurdle I overcome.

Katherine Fraser
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Katherine Fraser is a graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and of the University of Pennsylvania. As a student she received the Thomas Eakins Painting prize, the Cecelia Beaux Portrait prize, and the William Emlen Cresson Memorial Travel Award, among others. Since graduation she has been exhibiting throughout the Mid-Atlantic region, and nationally. Katherine grew up in Maine as an only child, and finds that experience often reflected in her work. Her subject matter comes from memories and experiences that feel in some way universal. By portraying singular figures in sparse settings, she explores the idea that being alone makes us feel most alive and connected to our true nature. She is represented by Paradigm Gallery, in Philadelphia.

My paintings depict moments of quiet reflection and insight, of wonder, vulnerability, yearning, determination, humility, strength, and growth. I see a duality in every moment, and beauty in the tension of opposing emotions existing in a single facial expression. As every person, and every experience is multifaceted, every painting is meant to express a dimensional idea. I am fascinated by the mutability of memory, by the way emotions can shape perception, and the way we unconsciously create narratives to understand our experience and explain our identities.

I paint out of my sincere desire to respect, express, and share the tender qualities that unite us. Compassionately and with a generous heart, I seek to portray our continual need to reckon expectations with truth, and the struggles we endure to feel satisfaction with our choices. My goal is not just to make aesthetically beautiful paintings, but to create works that touch and resonate with the complexity of real world experience.

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Saskia Fleishman
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Saskia Fleishman b. 1995 graduated Rhode Island School of Design in 2017 with a BFA in painting. Fleishman is based in Brooklyn, NYC. Recent residencies include Vermont Studio Center, Trestle Art Space, and The Otis Emerging Curator Retreat.

Curious about curating other artists’ work, as well as exhibiting her own, Saskia continues to collaborate with peers around the greater New York area. In addition, Fleishman has exhibited her work in Miami, Providence, Rome, San Juan, and Milwaukee.

Statement

This series of paintings is generated through photographs of American landscape taken on recent vacations and images sourced from my family’s collection. These photographs are then composed as geometric abstractions, op-art, or color studies from  ”The Interaction Of Color” by Joseph Albers, in order to deconstruct, reflect upon, and rebuild early memory and perception. I pair flat, smooth, hard-edge paint applications aesthetic with textural materials such as sand, resin, and paper clay, to add unexpected dimension and reflection. The paintings explore nostalgia while contemplating moments in time, perception, and our relationship to memories embedded in landscapes.

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Adam Hall

As a visual artist, Adam Hall began working mostly with charcoals and oils. Self taught, he attempts to mix traditional style with contemporary. Using palette knifes and layering techniques he creates a true richness and depth to his work. Adam believes every painting is his next opportunity in truly expressing his vision and vibe through landscape. “Art is such a powerful tool and I strive to use it in the most positive way I know how.” While his passion for art began growing up in Wellsburg, West Virginia, his professional artistic career began nearly a decade ago in Nashville. Adam quickly became involved with a local interior design firm whose clientele took great interest and demand for his art. His work is now featured in several galleries throughout the southeast United States. Adam Hall proudly resides in Nashville, TN, with his wife Thais. Adam spends most of his time in his studio in Nashville and continues to discover a fulfilling purpose through art.

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adamhallart/

FB page: https://www.facebook.com/adamhallart/

Jiela Rufeh
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Jiela Rufeh was born in Boston, Massachusetts of German and Persian descent. She grew up in the small colonial town of Concord, encompassed by a rich cultural and literary history. The lush New England wilderness has served as inspiration to great thinkers who resided there such as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Growing up, Rufeh’s mother was a working artist who started taking she and her brother to all the greatest museums in Europe at a very young age. After years of eye rolling, all the early exposure became a source of inspiration for Rufeh when she fell in love with the work of Georgia O’Keefe after seeing her iconic large-scale paintings of flowers at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

Rufeh’s education and professional life have taken her across the country from DC, New York, and Boston to San Diego where she currently lives and works. She first attended American University as a Communications major but transferred to University of Syracuse to study Photography and Sculpture. While there, she was introduced to the work of Irving Penn, whose technical virtuosity with a lens and cutting-edge aesthetic remains her biggest photographic influence. Rufeh then went on to do post-graduate work at the International Center of Photography in New York. She began interning at Harper’s Bazaar, quickly making her way through the ranks of the photography world of NYC with the goal of being a fashion photographer. Penn’s work made her realize that she didn’t have to sacrifice her creative impulses to work in commercial photography.

After a year, Rufeh went to California to studio lighting at the prestigious Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara and work in commercial advertising. She was swept up in the digital revolution, learning all the newest digital media tools under one of LA’s hottest commercial photographers. She worked to overcome the obstacles inherent to photographers emerging within the paradigm of new media, not to mention for photographers and photo-assistants that were female. Missing the intrinsic stir she had received from sculpture, the possibilities of new media inspired Rufeh to begin experimenting with incorporating different materials—especially encaustic—into her photography. It was a way of rebelling against her commercial work and pushing the photo to a place where it wasn’t allowed to go in the commercial world.

Aside from working as a commercial photographer for more than 20 years, Rufeh has been exhibited nationally for over a decade with multiple solo exhibitions in Berlin, Germany. The last few years have been the most exciting for Rufeh’s career as an artist. She now devotes all her time to her studio, volunteer work, and meditation practices while maintaining a consistent presence amongst the Southern California art scene, exhibiting most recently at the Museum of Latin American Art and the William D. Cannon Art Gallery. She works to develop new photo techniques that push her work into different genres and hopes that her art will continue to generate discussion regarding new media and environmental issues.

Statement

Visual art is an immediate expression of meaning—a commentary on things personal, societal, or even universal—and it has a unique energy. This unfolding universal energy has been an evolving interest of mine and my work has been influenced by my study of it and its manifestation throughout different cultures. It is a quest that cannot be separated from our daily lives.

Nature to me is an obvious place to start when dealing with these themes. We can see ourselves in the shapes of nature and in the way all its various elements affect one another. There are also man-made structures and landscapes that reflect our nature in a different way; years of layered graffiti reveal an undocumented history of creativity. But the insistent beckoning of nature is the hardest to ignore.

I travel extensively to remote natural locations to take photographs that explore my concepts and to be completely absorbed by the elements around me ‐ the colors, the smells, the silence, the peace, the wind brushing against my skin, the warmth of the sun… all awaken my senses.

When I come back to the studio I never really know where the photograph will take my painting. To be of worth, art must be expressive, sharing an artist’s thoughts and feelings. For me, feelings are paramount. The picture speaks to my gut and my body responds instinctively, emotionally, with color, texture or the absence thereof. My goal is that this visceral approach allows me to communicate something personal that becomes universal.

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Holly MacKinnon

Holly MacKinnon is an artist based out of Montreal, Canada.  She received her BFA from NSCAD University in 2015. In 2014, she was awarded the Art In Schools Scholarship in Stellenbosch, South Africa, where she spent a semester interning for a community art program and painting.  Since then, she has been developing her body of work, experimenting with different subject matter and exploring themes such as the relationship between humans and nature.  Her work has been shown in exhibitions and publications in Canada and the UK.  She recently completed an artist residency in Iceland.

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Statement

Her work is mostly oil paintings of figures within dreamlike landscapes and spaces. Nature is an escape from reality and provides an intense loneliness that the artist enjoys. These experiences in nature bring about a certain self-reflection. Most of the figures she paints in these scenes look lost, disturbed and lonely even when they are not alone. They seem to have wandered into the woods for want of a peaceful place.  There are many ideas at play: childhood, mental and emotional (in)stability, and the relationship between humans and nature.

A still moment that seems uneventful is full of conflicting energy: calm landscape, dark ominous sky, disturbed expressions – the painting pulls us in and out of joy and despair.  In these woods, experiences are not shared: they are individual and deeply personal and differ greatly from one figure to the next – what transpires in the mind of our neighbour we do not know.    



The Obscured Landscape Exhibition by Christopher Burk

My newest exhibition, The Obscured Landscape, plays upon the imagery of the “obscured” that occurs within the urban landscape. The exhibition continues my interest in the nocturne, with carefully composed pieces that focus on the camouflage that occurs within the exterior environments. The featured obstructions have at times been intentionally created by the hand of man, while at other moments, they have been created by nature. The level of obstruction ranges from a slight hindrance to complete obliteration - a short privacy fence separates one home from the next while towering foliage creates a complete barrier to a barren parking lot. While elements of human activity exist, such as a light shining from a window or a trash can on the corner, the paintings absolve themselves from actually depicting people. Instead, the work records and reflects upon the transformation of the urban environment by people through their action with or against the natural environment.

- Christopher Burk

Exhibition Information:

Brandt-Roberts Galleries

642 N High St, Columbus, Ohio 43215

October 5 - 31, 2018

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Opening Reception, October 5th 5:30 PM – 8 PM






Supernatural Aura: Interview with Dana Oldfather

These works celebrate paint while examining roles of motherhood and femininity. Images of family, friends, and the female figure drive composition. Sometimes scenes are recalled from memory and sometimes I use my camera roll for loose reference. Fantasy and obligation charge and bind domestic environments, giving recent memories new form. The space is similar to that of a hallucination, where one is unsure what is real and what is not. Objects bleed into and become one another. Paint veils, drips, splashes, airbrush passages, and wet into wet oil marks add to the tension and supernatural aura of the scene. Figure, object, and landscape spin out and smear together as the paintings shudder with a pulsing, nervous energy. I use anxious, frenetic mark making to mirror a rushing world distorted by apprehension. These paintings underscore the inherent emotional conflict of parenting young children, and the fragility of comfort and happiness in America today. 

www.danaoldfather.com

by Sarah Mills

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You have an extremely unique and interesting style, how did you develop it?

Thank you so much! Previously, I made mixed media, non-objective abstract paintings. Eliminating recognizable subjects helped me concentrate on how I instinctively handle paint. I noticed the difference between what my brush did when it hit the palette and what it did when it hit the canvas. I liked what my hand was doing was I wasn’t trying to make a mark better than what it did when I was trying. I wanted to figure out how to bring that force and confidence to my canvases. In 2017, after developing this mark making for over five years, I decided it was time to bring the figure back in. I’m enjoying using a variety of media, real and abstract objects and reconciling them within the work.

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How do you go about starting a new piece?

I sketch ideas - funny or odd things I’ve seen recently or memories that leave a taste in my mouth. Many sketches don’t turn into paintings, but it is a valuable part of my editing process. The paintings take longer to make than they have in the past so I need to be sure the idea can sustain me through to the end.

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What is your favorite part of your creative process?

The newest addition to my mixed media arsenal is the airbrush and I’ve really been enjoying it lately. Developmentally, the middle stage of these paintings is an absolute mess. I start using the airbrush near the end of the middle stage when all the discordant bits start to tune in. The airbrush has a magical feel, as though every unexpected mark it makes fits my need exactly. I like the way it’s fuzzy, hinky line establishes pictorial depth. The airbrush also contrasts well with the atmospheric acrylic washes and splashes of the early layers, and the heavy wet into wet oil marks of the later layers of the painting.

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Can you tell us more about your subject matter and where you draw inspiration from?

The strangeness of the human condition, predominantly in relationships of motherhood and family, fuels this work. The scenes are domestic but dreamlike and hallucinatory. Figures are tied up and bound together. They are propped up by each other but they are imprisoned by each other as well. Color harmonies and clumsy, endearing forms create joyful moments while frenetic marks remind us of the effort and strain it takes to bring those moments about. In these scenes, happiness is earned at a price.

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What are you currently working on?

I’m working on canvases for two out of town solo shows and a two-person show in Cleveland next year. The galleries out of town hold inventory from the exhibitions so I make new work for each show. As I mentioned earlier, the paintings develop slowly now. I finally understand that I can’t get too worried about my schedule. I’m making work for the pleasure of making it.

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Your work is so layered and has so many beautiful moments in it, how do you decide when a piece is finished?

Thank you very much!! I appreciate that. What I’ve wanted to see in a finished painting has evolved with my experience for sure. I expect more from the work now. I want to see a certain fullness in each part of the surface before I can stop adding (or removing and adding) more. Even areas that look like big empty spaces have activity. They vibrate with layered texture and color. Once the painting hums I know it’s done.

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What is one piece of advice you would share with our readers?

I enjoy reading books about writing. The good ones are full of helpful advice that, in my opinion, can apply to most art forms. I recently finished “Draft No 4” by John McPhee, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, and pioneer of creative nonfiction. In a chapter titled ‘Omission’, he discusses the importance of leaving things out of one's writing. As an additive painter, it’s given me a lot to chew on. He advises that “Writing (insert painting) is a selection. If something interests you, it goes in - if not, it stays out. Forget market research. Never market research your writing (painting).” And my favorite from McPhee later in that chapter: that one ought to “Give elbow room to the creative reader (viewer). In other words, to the extent that this is all about you, leave that out.”

Anne Buckwalter

Anne Buckwalter is an American painter. Her work has been exhibited and collected in the United States, Canada, and Italy, and she has participated in residency programs in the US and Canada. She lives and works in Philadelphia, PA.

Statement

Inspired by the historic tradition of allegorical painting, my work explores and challenges the rules of human behavior and interaction. At once quiet and disquieting, my paintings employ uncertainty, tension, and ambiguous representational space to investigate the emptiness of social constructs. Specifically, my work raises questions about how gender-related expectations are defined and disrupted.

Shira Sela
“I am a painter & illustrator living and working in Montreal, Canada.

My work explores notions of nostalgia, escapism, memory and childhood.

My paintings were featured on television, books, magazines & album covers, and exhibited in Galleries in North America, Australia and Europe.”
— Shira Sela

 

 

Lindsey Warren 

Lindsey Warren is an American artist, born and raised in Los Angeles. She graduated from Boston University, earning a BFA in 2004 and MFA in 2008. Lindsey’s paintings have been exhibited throughout the United States with recent shows in Los Angeles, New York City, and Laguna Beach. Lindsey has been a studio artist in Chashama’s Workspace Program in NYC and a participant in the Bronx Museum’s AIM program. Her public works and murals have been installed in Boston and New York City. 

I make paintings using an arrangement of shapes to construct images of moments I experience during daily activities. I capture observations using photographs, later comparing them to my memory of the time. Color and proportions are revised until the image most closely reflects my perception. I am constantly aware of the distinct colors and light within each environment and how these atmospheric differences alter the way we experience and interact with the urban landscape. The paintings are visual responses to my past and current homes and stem from observations of basic daily encounters that are commonly overlooked. 

Annie Norbeck

Annie Norbeck grew up across the US, from the Midwest to both coasts and back to the Midwest. Years of car travel across states left a permanent imprint of the varied landscape — and the marks of humans across the land — from the thin trace of power lines across the sky to massive roadworks, earthworks, and ruins of fading industry. These experiences, plus a love of materials, led her to her Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Maryland Institute College of Art, where she worked across media to evoke those early feelings. After graduation, her work was part of the ongoing exhibition in a local Baltimore gallery.

Her work today embraces those impressions of rural America. Depending on the event, area, or emotion being conveyed, the work veers from representation to abstraction. She continues to use varied media in recent paintings that explore the price and value of the natural environment, and what, ultimately, is left behind.

Annie lives and works in Montclair, NJ, and her work is held in multiple private collections across the US, Canada, and Australia.

Statement

My most recent work is informed by the horizon, rural and wild spaces, human infrastructure interwoven into the landscape, feelings evoked by the human impact on the environment, and a deep and constant need to connect with nature. Environmental policy changes have left me questioning the price and value of the natural environment, and what, ultimately, we leave behind. What results is often work that straddles the line between pessimism and optimism.

As a painter, I am obsessed with process, the emotions suggested by memory and material interactions, and things left to chance.

Meghan Hildebrand

Meghan Hildebrand’s paintings are constant exercises in innovation and improvisation. With a unique vocabulary of symbols, she translates her northern coastal landscape into electrifying dreamscape scenarios, each image often alluding to a larger narrative. 

Despite frequent reinvention, her works often return to familiar themes—the childhood dream, a sense of journey over land, and the ‘personality’ of place. Defined points of interest, doorways, and inlets, invite the viewer to enter the image and join the narrative.

Sarah Winkler

Sarah Winkler lives and works near Denver, Colorado. Originally from Manchester, England, Winkler studied Art and Earth Science at William Patterson University. She has exhibited her work nationally in solo and group exhibitions at K Contemporary, Space Gallery, RH Contemporary Art, Helikon Gallery, Gallery MAR, The Thoreau Center for Sustainability, Fouladi Projects Gallery, Berkeley Art Center, and Gallerie Citi. Art commissions have been placed in private and corporate art collections internationally. These include Chevron, Marriott, Hyatt, Ritz Carlton, One Empire Pass, Montage, Deer Valley Resort, Hilton West Palm Beach, Viceroy, Mountain Shadows and The Cosmopolitan Hotel. Winkler's art has been featured in Scientific American Magazine, New American Paintings, Dwell, Mountain Living Magazine, and Alpine Modern Magazine.

My approach to landscape painting involves selecting textural elements of mountain or desert geology and rearranging them into a utopian vision of Open Space where the only human encroachment in these invented worlds is the artist and the viewer. 

I begin in a miniature collage format, creating fully realized landscape compositions. I scale up these paper sketches by hand drawing them onto wood panels and recreating their colors and textures in a large scale with acrylic media. The hard edge, sectional quality to my imagery reflects the many layered strata, deposited over time, that makes the whole scene appear quite natural. The artistic techniques used both in creating my collage papers and in applying the paint not only reflect the geological forces of landscape accretion and corrosion, but also reenact them. I often use crushed minerals embedded into the paint and apply resists of ground water, wind, friction and heat to erode the painted surfaces. 

In viewing these luminous mountainous worlds, I hope that they seem sentimentally familiar. That the environments carry an air of nostalgia and wonder about the natural world as if you are discovering a place for the first time. 

Support the production of a Making Art film about Sarah's work by signing up on Patreon.

Mark Bradley-Shoup

Mark Bradley-Shoup earned his BFA from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in Painting and Drawing and his MFA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Studio Art. He has exhibited his work in Los Angeles, Boston, Atlanta, Nashville, Knoxville, Omaha, Miami, Birmingham, Santa Monica, New Orleans and Vancouver, B.C. In addition to his extensive exhibition record, Bradley-Shoup has been the recipient two Make Work grants, the Individual Artist Fellowship from the Tennessee Arts Commission, an Individual Arts Grant form Allied Arts of Greater Chattanooga, and a Pollock-Krasner Grant, as well as nominated for the Dedalus Foundation, Joan Mitchell Award and a George Marshall Fellowship. His work has been published in New American Paintings, Backwards City Review, and the New Orleans Gambit Weekly

Currently, Bradley-Shoup is based in Chattanooga where he lives with his wife and two children and is a Lecturer at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga. 

Statement

When it comes to studio practice, I consider myself a pluralist, meaning that I do not dedicate myself to a singular vision or practice of creating images. The intention of my abstract and representational work is to address the theme of expansion and recession, consumption and growth, and in short, the elegance of brutality. The majority of my work is derived from my observation and interaction with the natural and constructed landscape and how we respond to our sense of place in the world, as I am deeply intrigued by how we inhabit and utilize space. Such work is often derived from my own photographs, as well as mapping systems and architectural schematics.

Given my response to consumer relationships and waste, I dedicate a third series of work that is derived from discarded items that culminate in the form of collages and mixed media. The images in this particular body of work are a form of aesthetic play and experimentation of media. While the majority of my work has distinct conceptual underpinnings, this series of work presents a more sincere discourse with the concept of ‘play’ within the confines of studio practice where I allow the images and compositions to present themselves throughout the course of experimentation. While these images are not directly addressing the concepts embedded in my other work, they are directly linked and continue to influence one another in ways that are not always obvious or apparent to the viewer. My collage and mixed media work is the truest form of studio research as many of the techniques and compositions that are fleshed out within these works often find themselves residing in my more traditional painting practice.