Posts tagged Landscapes
Metaphorical Landscapes by Madeline Peckenpaugh
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Madeline Peckenpaugh was born in Milwaukee, WI, and currently resides in Providence, Rhode Island. She has had two solo shows with Seraphin Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, and has exhibited with Avery Galleries, PA, Gross McCleaf Gallery, PA, Schmidt/ Dean Gallery, PA, Sol Koffler Gallery, and Gelman Gallery in Providence, Rhode Island. She has work in the permanent collection of the Woodmere Art Museum in Philadelphia, PA, along with the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Peckenpaugh received her BFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2015, and is currently an MFA painting candidate at the Rhode Island School of Design.

 Statement  

My paintings are depictions of metaphorical landscapes, created through the force and tension of nature and material. The illusion of space within each painting is interrupted by the materials being used, and the narrative of the image is found through the process of that exploration. The landscape is felt through various forces of nature, such as: life-cycles, transitional states of weather, and gravity.

The mind’s depiction of form and reality unfold through the various mark making, in an attempt to create an engaging space. This space is being constructed by echoes of former representations that might suggest or feel like an experience of nature. It is important for me to be conscious of  the physical object of the painting itself, and the removed space within the painting, it's here and not here.

www.madelinepeckenpaugh.com

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Vibrant Imagined Landscaped by Drica Lobo
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Drica Lobo is an artist whose work captures happiness and vibrant strokes. Drica’s fascination with art began as a small child. She was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, moved to the United States in 2003, and made Hermosa Beach, CA her home in 2007. Largely self- taught, Lobo has taken several painting classes during 15 years where she has studied with celebrated artists including Jose Ismael and Lisa Schultz. She completed her Master of Communications Degree at the University of Guarulhos, Sao Paulo in 2001.

 

Her paintings establish a link between the landscape’s reality and that imagined by its conceiver. These works focus on concrete questions that determine our existence. By examining the ambiguity and origination via retakes and variations, she investigates the dynamics of landscape, including the manipulation of its effects and the limits of spectacle based on our assumptions of what landscape means to us. Rather than presenting a factual reality, an illusion is fabricated to conjure the realms of our imagination.

 

The artist can easily imagine an own interpretation without being hindered by the historical reality.

 

Drica Lobo currently lives and works in Hermosa Beach. Her work is included in public and private collections around the world, including Brazil, United States, Singapore, and China. She is a member of South Bay Artist Collective (HBCA) and Foundation of Local Arts (FOLA) in California.

 

‘I paint colorfully to show the world the positive influence of colors and the power of strokes, creating an imaginary scenario based on nature and freedom state of mind. Art is limitless and I'm committed to making the viewer closer to his heart, manipulating shapes and feelings through the selection and composition of color. More than anything, my paintings are feelings as much as they are imaginary. I recognize the value in self-expression, so I find a way to let my inner self be expressed on the outside. Colors are feelings, and it can also be possibilities.’

Landscape Embroidery by Victoria Rose Richards
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I am a thread painter, born, raised, and currently living in South-West Devon, UK. After experimenting with a range of mediums since my GCSEs, I settled on embroidery last year after finally finding an art form I could fall in love with. I haven’t looked back, and now while away the free hours I used to spend stressing instead of creating small, colorful landscapes using embroidery floss and wool! 

In living in a rural area with woods, fields, and rivers, and even near the ocean, I often take inspiration from the abundance of nature around. I especially enjoy doing coastal and ocean landscapes. More recently, I have also begun embroidering aerial tropical island pieces, I believe reflecting my great love of tropical marine biology which I developed after completing my biology degree this year!

Statement

I think that strong colors and textures can make an art piece bubble and fizz. This feeling overflows so that creating and looking at these pieces can make your heart lift as if it’s being buoyed on all the bubbles. Why I want to create my art is simple: I want to create bubbles and fizz!

www.instagram.com/chromato_mania

Graphic Landscape Paintings by Scott Allen Roberts
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Scott Allen Roberts is a Los Angeles native living and practicing in New York. A fine art major from the University of Southern California and postgraduate from Parsons the New School, Scotts’ observational landscapes explore cosmological, ontological, and phenomenological concepts surrounding the ideas of existentialism and the human condition. In the history of landscape art, there have always been questions of how humanity fits into its environment. Having experienced close familial death early on in his life with the loss of his parents, themes of mortality both haunt and enlighten his work. The burning human questions of ‘Where do we go when we die?’ ‘Where did the world come from?’, or ‘What is the meaning of it all?’ were the first of many that Scott pondered in his youth and contemplated in observation of landscapes.

 

Roberts’ landscapes borrow from many styles to create work that is bold, graphic, and fantastical. His landscapes ask humanities questions of the unknown, enticing the viewer through vibrant color, larger scale formats, and hints of the decorative. The viewer is drawn into an allegory filled with metaphors. From a contemporary perspective, Roberts typically employs the use of reflections, cast shadows, and portals such as windows or doors as a question of where our actual and virtual lives intersect, and the illusions that accompany both sides. Scott continues to explore his personal journey through art and allows the viewer insight into not just his, but their own deeper feelings with the work. Scott is fresh on the New York art scene and having already sold to private collectors is ready to promote his work commercially.

 

Scott Allen Roberts practices fine art in New York. His work is comprised of landscape and figurative work exploring the concept of existentialism and the human condition. He has studio spaces in the Hudson Valley located in upstate New York as well as a satellite studio in Manhattan.

Studio Sunday: Samantha Boni
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This Sunday’s feature gives you a behind the scenes peek into the studio practice of one of our PxP Contemporary invited artists, Samantha Boni. Based in Italy, she creates stunning landscapes and is inspired by nature and the freedom associated with being an artist. Learn more in her interview below and then check out her two affordable paintings available with our gallery through our first exhibition Pilot. The show is only up for a few more weeks so don’t miss out on the chance to collect her work or one of the many other incredible artists we curated for this inaugural show!

Bio

Samantha Boni was born in Modena, Italy. After studying languages at school, she took painting lessons from Italian maestro Alberto Cavallari and then attended the antiques restoration school, La Bottega del Restauro, in Modena for four years. At the same time, she started her career as a professional painter.

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When did you first become interested in art?

I have always been interested in art. I started painting when I was a child and developed this passion through my teen years. Then I discovered restoration and studied al fresco techniques for years.

Tell us about what inspires you creatively.

I am inspired by nature and its light, what hits my eyes and gives me feelings or emotions.

What is your process like?

I am working on a series of abstract paintings about water and its energy. I use palette techniques and I feel that there’s something therapeutic about it - strength, energy, anger, fury, happiness and sadness all together.

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Describe your current studio space. What is most important about it or one thing that you can’t live without in your work area?

My studio is a well lit room with sketches everywhere. When I work I really need silence, like being closed in my favorite bubble.

What is one piece of advice that has stuck with you or a quote that you think is especially meaningful?

Art is freedom. Try, try, try and try again.

Are there any exciting exhibitions, projects, or collaborations going on this year that you’re currently working on or will be soon?

I’ve been focusing on my series of abstract landscapes. It’s a new mission to me. At the moment, I also have an exhibition in Italy at the Villa the Moll and I’m really proud to be part of your project PxP Cpntemporary.

Studio Sunday: Molly Mansfield

This week’s Studio Sunday feature highlights the work of artist Molly Mansfield. We’re so excited to be bringing you a closer look at her paintings and best tips for maintaining a creative practice. Read her interview below and then check out her two beautiful and affordable pieces that are currently available online with PxP Contemporary!

Bio

I live in small town Texas with my husband and two little boys. Working with watercolor, gouache, and oil paints, I use handmade pigments that are mined from the earth's minerals.

My childhood days were spent playing amongst the leaves in the nursery owned by my parents and running barefooted and wild on my grandfather's property. Nature and particularly plants have played an important role in helping me to cope with anxiety. Now as a mother, thinking about my children, I value its role even more. When encountering nature, so many feelings are elicited. There is the excitement of spotting a rare bird, the wonder of a spiders web, an overwhelming sense of peace when standing at the water's edge, and even fear when met face to face with a coyote. Nowhere than in nature are the senses so stimulated.

The fury of our fast-paced, productivity driven, consumer culture is often overwhelming and anxiety-inducing. I regularly feel the struggle to counter these pressures in my life and work.

Statement

My paintings are impressions of experiences. Abstractions of a memory seeking to speak to the benefits of interacting with the natural world. Nature beckons us to take time out of our busy schedules to pause and take in the beauty. I want my paintings to reflect that sentiment. My process is measured and intentional. There is a lot of looking and soaking in the experience. Each brush stroke is carefully placed to describe the feeling that I am trying to create. My hope is that when you look at my artwork you are compelled to slow down, maybe take a deep breath, enjoy something beautiful, and engage with the present moment.

When did you first become interested in art and what drew you to painting?

Like most young children I was always making and inventing things. My mom was always coming up with some new creative project for me to work on from bead making to sewing and knitting to designing container gardens. I loved the opportunity to explore and certainly benefitted from being able to look at art making through different viewpoints via playing with different mediums. Painting has always been there though, and it has always had my heart. It was elevated in my mind as a child by a few images I had seen of Van Gogh’s work, a thin paperback portfolio of Cezanne that we owned, and receiving postcards in the mail from my aunt, Jennifer Young who is a painter. This modest collection of paintings I had access to, was devoured by me. Every color and brushstroke becoming ingrained in my mind. But every time I came back to the paintings an overwhelming feeling came over me, the energy moved me, I was taken far far away from my present situation to something magical that I had never experienced before. The paintings couldn’t be memorized. The process of making a painting is very feeling oriented as well. I love the experience of guiding, sliding the creamy buttery paint across the canvas. I turn music on, my whole body is moving, I’m not thinking about what I’m doing I just know I can’t stop. I keep laying down brushstrokes boldly side by side, alone they are blocks of color but together they become something recognizable. Something that has meant so much to me and I hope becomes meaningful for the viewer.

Can you tell us a little about the inspiration behind your work and the series (or multiple bodies of work) that you are focusing on at the moment?

Imagine driving down a well trodden road, but you still can’t keep your eyes off the landscape. A line of cars builds up behind you , but you are struck with overwhelming beauty of whats in front. The grey stormy skies, the saturation of the well watered layers of fields. There is something new and exciting about the view and yet something familiar.

We moved out of Austin last summer to a small town near my hometown. It was an unusually rainy and cloudy fall for Texas. I was struck driving the road, FM 973, that connects my small town to Austin by the rolling green hills and grey skies. The landscape that you can see from this road is so striking because it is slightly higher elevation and open farmland with layers and layers of fields and crops leading up to the horizon line. I knew that I had to paint these views and I wanted to, focus on movement, shapes, and feeling, over details.

The collection, “Views From 973” is inspired by memories. Abstract & Fluid. Moments running into each other. Not about the fine details but about the feeling and emotion of the experience. Though these landscapes are inspired by a particular place, it makes sense that one might remind you of your own adventures. That’s when it becomes about human connection. Something that started as part of my own story, but then becomes yours.

This body of work has been the most intuitive work I have ever done. I look at so many of the pieces in this collection and think, “how did I even do that?!” The Brushstrokes, compositions, colors, none of it was planned really. I went into it with a feeling that I wanted to express and then let the process take over. This is work that I felt Inside of me and I knew I had to create.

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Describe your current studio space. What is most important for keeping a consistent creative practice?

My studio sometimes is the kitchen table, sometimes my bedroom dresser, and always most of the closets in our house (for storage, not for painting in, LOL). I am beginning to long for a more permanent space to create in, but honestly working out of my home has served me well. I’ve been painting (almost) every day for the past five years. Most of that happens in the evenings after my kids are in bed and I clean up my mess, packing everything back into closets when I’m done. I am very energized to work in the evenings, however homebody that I am, it is the last time of day that I want to leave my house. I have loved creating in the center of my home near the energy of my family and the comfort of my tea kettle.

Here are a few things that have really helped me in having a consistent creative practice.

1) Just start making. Its that simple. If you can, organize your day so that you are creating at the same time. Pay attention to what times of day you have the most creative energy, are you a morning person or a night owl? There may be times in the beginning when you don’t feel like making anything but just keep showing up, eventually the muse will show up too. After a couple of months of coming to the studio consistently you will have a habit, and after that I think it is pretty easy. I did a 100 day project 5 years ago and I’ve been painting nearly every day since, it’s just what I do and I love it.

2) Remove distractions. A few years back we got rid of our TV. Relaxation and enjoyment are good things, but for me Netflix was taking over my life, I felt like I wasn’t in control of how I spent my time. This was the best decision ever because while vegging can feel nourishing in the moment because it is passive, painting is what FEEDS MY SOUL.

3) Make your workspace comfortable. Do what you can to make your space not only where you want to be, but a place where you feel relaxed and able to let the creativity flow out of you. I once had a studio with no air conditioning in the summer in Texas. I did make work there but there was no lingering with delight over the process. You know I got out of there as soon as I could call the piece done! Recently I have been making work out of my home. It’s not glamorous. I could’ve rented a studio but home is just the only place I want to be at the end of the day (when I paint).

What is your favorite thing about being an artist?

Freedom! I get to be with my kids, make art and have a business. I get to make my own schedule. I don’t like people telling me what to do, LOL. I am allowed to follow my interest, passion, and muse. Making art isn’t all lollipops and fluffy clouds, sometimes there’s a wrestling that has to happen. Communicating what’s in my head, a thought or a concept into something visual on the canvas is hard work. There are so many ideas and in a way each one is a problem to be solved. Thinking, trying, thinking again. Once something clicks the work just starts coming out and I just have to keep up. The best word I can think of to describe this feeling when the idea is out and on canvas, is freedom. Sigh. Now I am ready to start on the next idea. ;)


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Name a few artists whose work has had an impact on you.

Pastmasters: Cezanne, Van Gogh, John Singer Sargent. Contemporaries: Jennifer Young and Richard Claremont.

Are there any exciting exhibitions, projects, or collaborations going on this year that you’re currently working on or will be soon?

Oh yes! I have just barely started making work for my first solo show here in Austin at Revelry in September! I am soooo excited about this body of work exploring a slightly different landscape than my last collection, of plants and our relationships with them. It is work that I have been thinking about for a long time and I feel like I’m finally ready to get it out and put it on the canvas. Of course I’m very excited about the show too!

Synnöve Seidman

"I was born in Toronto, Canada, a first generation Canadian of Finnish descent. Fortunately I was raised in an artistic and unconventional family. I moved between the city and rural countryside throughout my childhood. After attending a fine arts high school I studied art history and philosophy at the University of Toronto. Afterwards I travelled to Florence Italy to continue studying Italian and art. 

I am fascinated by the restorative power of beauty and it's balm on the anxiety of modern life.  My current work is asking the question, does the natural world embody beautiful ideas? I am exploring shapes and light and their relationship with transition and memory.  Abstract landscapes, city structures and botanical elements find their way into many of my compositions.

I am inspired by nature, it is my cathedral."

www.bysynnove.com