Posts tagged Museum
Create! Magazine introduces RijksCreative, an initiative from the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam

We often get questions from our community from people who are interested in art, but are wondering how to get started. Whether you are a practicing studio artist, a passionate hobbyist, or even if you’ve never picked up a brush, we always love to recommend looking into free online resources to take your creative skills to the next level. To this end, Create! Magazine is excited to share a series of art tutorials on the YouTube channel, RijksCreative, an initiative from the Rijksmuseum, a renowned art museum in the heart of Amsterdam.

About RijksCreative

As part of an initiative that brings both greater awareness and appreciation of the vast collection of masterpieces exhibited at the Rijksmuseum, the RijksCreative YouTube channel allows you to delve deeper into the style of prominent figures throughout art history. On RijksCreative you’ll find how-to videos in which art teachers from the museum demonstrate the steps to creating compositions like Rembrandt or painting self portraits like Van Gogh. Each video explains one art technique in detail so that even beginners can follow along! 

Check out the RijksCreative channel here.

One recent video from this series is the ‘How to create a Van Gogh self portrait’ lesson from Ruud Lanfermeijer. Make sure to read the video notes for a materials list and you’ll be ready to start!

About the Rijksmuseum

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam is the Dutch national museum dedicated to the arts and history. It is located in the museum square close to the Van Gogh Museum, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, and the Concertgebouw. The building was designed by Pierre Cuypers and opened in 1885. The Rijksmuseum has on display over 8,000 objects and a total collection of over 1 million. A walk through the galleries is a journey through 800 years of art and history. Some of the museum’s masterpieces include works by Rembrandt, Van Gogh, Frans Hals, and Johannes Vermeer. The Rijksmuseum is the largest museum in the Netherlands and welcomes over 2.5 million visitors each year.

For more information about the museum please visit their website.

Rijksmuseum - 2014 - John Lewis Marshall - 04 (JPEG) (1).jpg
5 Questions with a Curator: Eileen Owens, Philadelphia Museum of Art

We were so thrilled to be able to chat with Eileen Owens, currently a Research and Exhibitions Assistant in the European Paintings Department at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. She curated the exhibition ‘Biting Wit and Brazen Folly: British Satirical Prints, 1780s–1830s', which opened at the museum earlier this year. The show will be on view for a few more weeks, until December 5th, so we highly recommend that you go and check it out!

Connoisseurs, 1799, by Thomas Rowlandson. Hand-colored etching. Given to the Philadelphia Museum of Art by Carl Zigrosser, 1974.

Connoisseurs, 1799, by Thomas Rowlandson. Hand-colored etching. Given to the Philadelphia Museum of Art by Carl Zigrosser, 1974.

Installation view. Photo credit: Joseph Hu.

Installation view. Photo credit: Joseph Hu.

Talk about your background in art and art history. Was it something that you were always interested in growing up?

Yes and no. I grew up in the southeast of Ireland, in a medieval city that was steeped in history. I would visit Kilkenny Castle often (my sister and I could probably still recite the tour now, decades later!) and loved learning about the city’s history. So, I had an appreciation for art in a very broad sense, but I didn’t visit my first art museum until I was a 17. When I moved to New York State, my high school offered an art history class, and I was immediately intrigued--I could actually learn about all these paintings I only vaguely knew about from TV or magazines. Taking that class, and having opportunities to visit the Met and MoMA on field trips, truly unlocked something in me. It was as if I was suddenly in on this secret new world--one I felt profoundly connected to.   

Even with this passion though, the understanding that I could have a career working in an art museum came to me fairly late. It wasn’t until I studied abroad in Rome my junior year of college that I committed to adding Art History to my major. The cliché of falling in love with art in Rome is true for me. I challenge anyone to live there for three months and not contemplate how important, enlightening, and continuously relevant art is in our shared history. Not to mention the sheer thrill of seeing so much beauty in one place! It was impossible to ignore.

You went on to study at Temple University for your MA in Art History. What was your focus and what did you enjoy about the program?

I studied nineteenth-century French art, with a focus on prints and print culture. I felt really supported by the faculty at Temple. The size of the program made it easy to develop solid mentor relationships with professors and some great friendships with fellow students as well. Being in an art history program that is part a renowned fine arts school—where people are creating and exchanging ideas in real time—was really appealing to me too.

Temple’s connection to Philadelphia and its arts and culture scene was also a huge influence, not only for access to exhibitions and arts institutions, but for internships and post-grad job applications, too. Being able to capitalize on that network really helped me get my foot in the door.

Tell us about how you ended up at the PMA! That must have been an exciting transition out of grad school.

It definitely was! I was very fortunate to have gotten a fellowship right out of school and to still be working at such a valuable institution now. I was selected as the Suzanne Andre Curatorial Fellow in Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, which is a two-year fellowship that I began in 2016. In grad school, I developed a love of works on paper—how they were made, how they functioned in society, who collected them—and this was my first museum position where I got to interact directly with these objects on a daily basis. Running the department’s busy study room, preparing for acquisition meetings, completing condition reports, taking courier trips—it was all vital training in the daily tasks of a curator.  

Monster Soup Commonly Called Thames Water, Being a Correct Representation of that Precious Stuff Doled out to Us, William Heath, 1794%2F95 - 1840 Gift of Mrs. William H. Horstmann, 1955.

Monster Soup Commonly Called Thames Water, Being a Correct Representation of that Precious Stuff Doled out to Us, William Heath, 1794%2F95 - 1840 Gift of Mrs. William H. Horstmann, 1955.

As part of your two-year fellowship you had the opportunity to curate an exhibition. How far in advance did you begin planning for it, what was the process like and what did it entail?

All in all, from concept to opening day, the show was in planning for the better part of a year and a half. I started throwing around potential exhibition ideas pretty much as soon as my fellowship began. I had a standing interest in caricature, having researched French satire for my masters’ thesis.  The museum’s holding of caricature, specifically British caricature, is so rich it just made sense to showcase these fantastically funny and perpetually relevant images.

I spent a long time looking through the more than 300 British caricatures in the museum’s collection. Early on, I made the choice to focus specifically on social satire, intentionally leaving out political works that might be less relevant (or understandable) to a modern audience today. What was so revealing, and actually pretty heartwarming, was how similar our collective sense of humor is now and then. What Londoners in the 1800s found funny and what we laugh about today really hasn’t changed that much. There are so many relatable threads running through the comedy of these centuries’ old prints—from anxieties about new technologies and environmental issues to the struggle to keep up with the latest fashion.

The Gout, James Gillray, c. 1745 - 1818. Purchased with the SmithKline Beckman Corporation Fund, 1949.

The Gout, James Gillray, c. 1745 - 1818. Purchased with the SmithKline Beckman Corporation Fund, 1949.

The show has been up for several months and has been extended until December, congratulations! What are you working on now or what's next?

Thank you! It has been so fun to share the exhibition with visitors. I love sneaking in the galleries and watching people, young and old, giggling at the prints!

I was fortunate enough to stay on at the PMA once my fellowship ended. Currently, I am a research and exhibition assistant in European Painting, working with curator Jenny Thompson on an upcoming Impressionist exhibition that will open in April 2019. In addition to the exhibition, we are planning a reinstallation of the PMA’s nineteenth-century permanent collection galleries too. Both are exciting projects that I’ve really enjoyed digging into!

*Photo credit for all exhibition installation images: Joseph Hu.

Going The Extra Mile: Career Decisions, Networking and Standing Out From The Crowd With Alicia Puig
Alicia reading  Create! Magazine  in Amsterdam

Alicia reading Create! Magazine in Amsterdam

Alicia Puig is an art historian who has worked for several notable galleries, museums, and nonprofit organizations throughout her career and who is very experienced in marketing for the arts and exhibition development. She was a practicing artist for many years, but after starting her first gallery job managing a small exhibition space for student art, she soon realized that she loved helping young artists put together what was often their first professional quality solo show more than creating her own work. Since then, she has continued to seek out new opportunities for creative professionals like herself and has connected many artists to their next exhibitions, published features, or sales.

On this episode, Alicia Puig shares how she figured out her unique career path in the art world and what helped her make the difficult decision about which one of her passions to pursue.

Alicia has been able to carve out a place for herself in the arts by practicing resilience and handling rejection with grace. She shares tips on how to stick out from the crowd and outsmart your competition when looking for opportunities. This episode also offers effective networking strategies and offers tips for artists on working with galleries.

If you are at a crossroads in your career or are excited about making it as a gallerist, curator or work with major art institutions, this one is for you!

Painting on a photograph by Alicia Puig (discussed in this episode)

Painting on a photograph by Alicia Puig (discussed in this episode)

Paintings Alicia Puig completed during her undergrad at Kutztown University

On Curating: Podcast Interview with Margaret Winslow, the Curator of Contemporary Art at the Delaware Art Museum
Photo by  Lindy Powers

Photo by Lindy Powers

Join us for a fun and informative conversation with Margaret Winslow, the Curator of Contemporary Art at the Delaware Art Museum. Margaret shares her journey of becoming a curator, offers advice for those interested in pursuing museum or curatorial work and shares tips for interested in getting a museum exhibition.

Margaret Winslow currently lives and works in Wilmington, Delaware where she is the Curator of Contemporary Art at the Delaware Art Museum. Margarethas curated for the Neuberger Museum of Art and The Delaware Contemporary and assisted with exhibits for the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. Her recent exhibitions at the Delaware Art Museum include Dream Streets: Art in Wilmington 1970–1990Retro-Active: Performance Art from 1964–1987Anne Truitt: Luminosities, and Once Upon a Time in Delaware: In Quest of the Perfect Book, the most recent installment of Nina Katchadourian’s Sorted Booksproject. In 2010, she attended Independent Curators International’s Curatorial Intensive in New York and in 2015, she served as juror for Art of the State: Pennsylvaniaat the State Museum of Pennsylvania. Margaretholds a B.A. in Art History from the University of Mary Washington and an M.A. in Modern and Contemporary Art, Theory, and Criticism from SUNY Purchase College.

Resources:

https://www.delart.org
http://www.mdartplace.org
https://www.nationalservice.gov/programs/americorps

(header image via website)

The Language of Painting: Podcast Interview With Artist Anna Valdez

In this episode of Art and Cocktails, Kat and Anna Valdez share a few drinks and dive into Anna's incredible journey as a painter. We chat about how her experiences in archeology and anthropology influenced her current work. Anna talks about her love of processes and rituals and explains the inspiration behind her beautiful paintings.

Born in 1985 in Sacramento, California, Anna Valdez’s interest in cultural formation and collective consciousness began in her hometown. Exposed from a young age to a uniquely Californian cultural milieu, her proclivity for collecting and crafting a poignant and meaningful visual vocabulary took root during time spent sharing in the traditions and environments of people within her community. Her fascination with the ways in which cultural identities intersect lead her to pursue a career in sociocultural anthropology.

It was on an archeological dig in Ireland that Valdez first discovered her skill for art making. Valdez was encouraged to keep a sketchbook of the site, creating scale drawings and maps. Visually reinterpreting these “abandoned sites” allowed Valdez to explore the connection between anthropological and artistic methods of cataloguing and record-keeping.

Today, working across painting, drawing, printmaking, collage, and digital media, Valdez examines the relationship between material and cultural identity. Valdez incorporates articles found in domestic spaces such as plants, textiles, vessels and keepsakes into her work as a method of storytelling.  Her colorful work invites the viewer to consider objects as emblematic of personal and collective experience, shifting between still life and portraiture. 

Anna Valdez received her MFA in painting from Boston University in 2013. Her work has been exhibited in museums and galleries across the United States. Valdez’s work has been featured in Juxtapoz Magazine, New American Paintings, Booooooom.com, and Daily Serving. Her work has recently been exhibited at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Masur Museum of Art, the Danforth Museum, Boston University Art Galleries, Hashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco, and Parts Gallery in Toronto Canada.

Anna's Work:
http://annavaldez.com/

Recent Museum Exhibition at Crystal Bridges:
https://crystalbridges.org/exhibitions/georgia-okeeffe/

Anna's Instagram

Photos by Nora Lowinsky

Interview with Kate Young: Hosting Inspiring Events at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
HAM Grandstairs 01 SoFA Gallery View.jpg


Tell us about the PAFA venue space. When did this program open up and what types of events do you host?
 
PAFA has been inviting special events in its spaces for decades, but it’s really taken off in the past five years. Businesses and couples are interested in shedding off the traditional banquet hall for something unique. By using spaces that inspire guests right when they walk in allows for hosts to set a mood from the start of their event! About half of our clients are couples getting married, and the other half are non-profit and corporate clients hosting events to honor their employees or their business partners.

Exterior of both buildings.jpg


Share a little bit of history behind the building. 
 
There are two buildings adjacent to each other that are available for guests to use. The Historic Landmark Building is the oldest museum in the country and has displayed a collection of American art from 1871. This space is an architectural masterpiece and reflects aspects of the Gothic revival movement in the US as well as Venetian designs, Eastern ornaments, and cast-iron work.
 
The Samuel Hamilton Building was actually built to be a car storage facility and showroom in 1916. The first two floors are now a modern gallery space that are shared by our event guests. Architecturally, the space is grand with expansive ceiling heights and a grand stair case that seems to float in the space. The interior structure of the massive building is supported by a triangular grid of interior concrete columns; once a practical way for cars to pass through the space, and now a wonderful way to allow for wide open gallery and event spaces.
 
Both buildings offer incredible spaces that serve a purpose other than events. In that way, they feel to me like they are more inviting and exciting!

HLB Grand Stairs Landing 03.jpg


 
What are some exciting attributes and bonuses to having an event at PAFA?
 
PAFA events naturally feel like you’re gaining secret access to the museum after hours – because you are! We are one of the only museums in the area that allow you to dine in the galleries rather than an offshoot event space. That makes for an incredible backdrop for your event space!
 
We work to provide a really seamless experience for guests for easy planning– with convenient parking garages or valet, coat checks, dance floors, lighting and A/V packages, and in-house tables and chiavari chairs. We take a lot of the guesswork out of throwing an event by having a team of experienced planners and event hosts!
 

HAM TUT+AB+SFA.jpg


What role does PAFA play in the Philadelphia arts and culture community?
 
Through our spectacular galleries, our internationally known school of fine arts, and our public programs, PAFA strives to provide students and visitors alike with a unique and thrilling experience. We’re always striving to be a source of inspiration for the Philadelphia community and grow our offerings to our students and the public. For example, PAFA was just awarded $500,000 from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania through the Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP) for the institution’s Campus Master Plan. Partnerships with local groups like Mural Arts – who’s office is in our Hamilton Building – allows us to stay involved in the art and culture scene outside of our galleries!

Cast Hall Groomsmen 01.jpg

How can those interested learn more and get in touch?
 
If you’d like to rent one of these incredible spaces, email Venue Sales Manager, Kate Young kyoung@pafa.org. If you’d like to know about other programs, exhibit schedules, or the school, visit our website at www.pafa.org!

Mark Liam Smith

Mark Liam Smith (b. 1973, Middlesbrough, England) developed an interest in art at an early age and spent much of his childhood drawing obsessively. After completing three bachelor degrees—Fine Arts (Painting), Science (Physiology), and Arts (Linguistics)—at the University of Saskatchewan, he moved to Paris to continue studying art in some of the world’s greatest museums. After some time, he returned to Canada to pursue a Ph.D. in Linguistics at McGill University.

Since moving to Toronto in early 2015, Mark has had several exhibitions, notably in Toronto, London, New York, and at the SCOPE Basel art fair in Switzerland. He has been granted the Emerging Artist Award by the Federation of Canadian Artists and featured by Hi-Fructose, Booooooom, and Bizarre Beyond Belief Magazine, among others.

Mark is represented by Galerie Youn (Montreal), Rouge Gallery (Saskatoon), and 19 Karen Contemporary (Gold Coast, Australia). 

Mark currently lives and works in Toronto.  

Statement

This series of paintings, A Day at the Met, examines the subjectivity of perception in art. When we view art, we filter it through our education, experiences, and emotions to derive meaning. An artist's intended meaning will thus have as many nuanced interpretations as there are viewers. This body of work is a meta-statement on the relationship between the artist, the art, and the viewer. 

This series was inspired by my observations of people at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. I wondered what these people brought to the art they were observing; specifically, how each interpretation was as unique as the viewer. In my paintings, I show what I imagine to be each viewer’s interpretation of the art they are observing by incorporating surreal elements and highly saturated color.

Because I am color-blind, I long had to rely on my knowledge of color-mixing formulas to recreate skin tones and other local colors. Later in my practice, I realized that local colors served only to restrict my expression. By viewing my color-blindness as a strength rather than as a weakness, I began embracing the use of non-local colors to develop my work. I use non-local colors to exaggerate the idea of subjectivity.