Posts tagged Nature
Color Washed Photography Inspired by Nature By Kristin Hart
PASTEL_DESERT_40x40.jpg

"Color washed Photography inspired by nature." 

Kristin Hart is a Florida based artist. Her pieces have a sense of calmness and dreamlike, almost otherworldly beauty. Often while editing, she adds washes of soft pastel color and accentuates the light to help express the emotions that she felt in that moment in time. Kristin's photography is a self-reflective and emotional journey, a way for her to document and visually express what is inside of her, with the primary objective of making the viewer feel a sense of peaceful and spiritual elevation.

CALIFORNIA_COLOR_40x60.jpg
Paintings of the Natural World in a Digital Age by Josiah Ellner
Summer_Nights_in_the_Backyard.jpg

Josiah Ellner is a Milwaukee-based artist who earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and Drawing from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2019.  Ellner was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin but grew up in Xi’an, China and later came back to Milwaukee to attend UWM.  Due to spending his whole life living in cities, he has always felt alienated from the natural world.  Despite these feelings of alienation, he has found himself strangely drawn to natural elements that are encountered in daily urban living. This has inspired him to create work that represents the estrangement of humanity from nature.  Through using a mixture of oils and acrylics, he paints figures in urban environments and inserts natural elements.

Statement 

The natural world has changed drastically since the onset of the digital age.  With this change, the natural world as we know it has begun to fade and become background noise to new technology.  Despite this, we as humans are still drawn to the natural world and tend to hold onto natural elements in our daily lives, whether that be consciously or subconsciously.  My work tackles the growing complicated relationship that people of the digital age have with the natural world.  My paintings evoke one to further contemplate their personal relationship with the natural world.

Large-Scale Paper Installations by Clare Celeste Börsch
10_IntimateImmensity1.4.jpg

Clare Celeste Börsch is an international artist best known for her large-scale paper installations and lush compositions of flora and fauna. Pushing the limits of assemblage and collage, Clare uses found, photographed, and hand-painted images to create artworks that span from works on paper to large-scale installations. Her portfolio includes clients in New York, London, Los Angeles, Houston, Berlin, Copenhagen, Barcelona, Milan, Victoria, and Perth. She lives in Berlin with her husband and son.  

I enjoy creating immersive spaces. I want work that draws people in and momentarily transports them somewhere surreal.
— Clare Celeste Börsch


Statement

Clare has been assimilating to different cultures and environments her entire life – having lived in Brazil, the US, Italy, Honduras, Argentina, and Germany. Rich with texture and detail, each composition pays tribute to her capacity to transform her archive of experiences into hallucinogenic ecosystems of their own. The lush assemblages of fauna and flora exude a visceral and intimate fragility. They speak to the mutable nature of memories as reconstructions that border on mythologies.

'Moment', Making Art's New Film on Landscape Artist Sarah Winkler

Landscape artist, Sarah Winkler, sums up our spiritual need for the wilderness in Making Art’s newly released film, ‘Moment.’

“We need the experience of being romantically and poetically lost in the wilderness, and being found again”

PikesPeakPinkGraniteNEW.jpg
SouthParkPlacerValley.jpg
SWA_8.17_Eclipse5.jpg
mountainforest.jpg
vermillioncliffs.jpg
PikesPeak.jpg
Emily White Uses Drawings to Reflect on the Human Relationship with Nature
EmilyWhite_CoyoteAndSnake_300dpi.jpg

I am drawn to the relationship between the animal and its changing environment. The rise of industry and technology have altered our native landscapes and redefined the relationships forged between humans and animals. My paintings are paired with objects that are distinctly human, illustrating the bond of the animal’s life with our own. I invite audiences to reflect on the consequences of human industry and innovation on our natural world, and our relationship to it.  

Emily White is a sculptor, painter, and muralist from Brockton, MA.  She received her BFA from Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston in 2011 with a focus in sculpture. White has received awards including the Wind Challenge (Fleisher Art Memorial), the Helen Blair Crosbie Sculpture Award (Massachusetts College of Art and Design), she was nominated for an Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award (International Sculpture Center) for two consecutive years, and she is a Visual Arts Fellowship Finalist (Center for Emerging Visual Artists).  Her artwork has been exhibited in public spaces such as the Philadelphia Zoo, the Entrance Garden of the Philadelphia Flower Show and in the Philadelphia International Airport.  White has had solo exhibitions at Hotbed (Philadelphia, PA), View Art Center (Old Forge, NY) and Penn State Altoona (Altoona, PA).  Her 2D and 3D work has been in group exhibitions in the US and abroad including shows at Harvard’s Peabody Essex Museum (Salem, MA), The Philadelphia Art Alliance, Fleisher Art Memorial, James Oliver Gallery, and The Royal Castle (Warsaw, Poland). Emily White lives in Philadelphia and works for the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program.

www.emilyrwhite.com

Dreamlike, Atmospheric Paintings by Chrys Roboras
Somewhere_.jpg

I love to place the human figure in vast, colorful semi-abstract landscapes. In some works, my figures are depicted outlines that have been filled in with various colors and shapes - as if the human form is a 'container' - of emotions, thoughts, and memories. In other works, there is a more realistic representation of the human form, yet a dreamlike atmosphere most often still pervades. The human condition - its isolated sense of being - is a central theme in my work, and stems from my own experience as a Diaspora Greek, in limbo between two cultures, always seeking a place to call home. "It is important to recognize the natural need of a human being to find a place to belong to; a place where one can find peace."

Chrys Roboras was born in Sydney, Australia. Coming to Athens she studied at Middlesex University, achieving a Bachelor of Fine Arts & Technology with First Class Honors. She has had 11 solo exhibitions; in Athens, Paros, New York, Toronto, London, Lugano, and Los Angeles.

Chrys has participated in Art Athina, Revolution Art Fair, Parallax Art Fair, Biennale of Chianciano, Biennale of Beijing, Biennale of Santorini, Scope Art Fair, Emerging Artist Award-Dubai, Art Takes Paris, The Artist Project and The Other Art Fair by Saatchi. Chrys’s work has achieved awards in various exhibitions.

Her work has been featured on music book covers, in the book «International Contemporary Masters Volume 5», Hidden Treasures Art 2014, ArtTakes Miami 2012, 2014, 2015, Serendipity Magazine "stories from the fringe" 2013 and made the shortlist for the Emerging Artist Award Dubai 2016.

Chrys has also won the feature in the Artist Portfolio magazine.

She has participated in over 50 group exhibitions in Greece and abroad.

Her work is found at the Museum of Fine Arts in Las Vegas and in many private collections in Greece and abroad. Chrys was also an invited Guest Speaker for UnfodingArt North Carolina, USA.

www.chrysroboras.com

Beautiful Paintings Inspired by Nature, Australian Artist Jessie Pitt
Reflection2019.107x173cmGraphiteInkAcryliconCanvasJessiePitt..jpg

Jessie is an Australian artist who is based in Austria. She is deeply inspired by the natural world, with a focus on mountain landscapes and nature. The constantly changing light, moods, seasons in the mountains offer a constant stream of inspiration. Jessie feels strongly connected to the mountainous landscape and her artworks are influenced by what she sees in connection to what she feels. A painter of light and shadow, she conveys an impression or a mood, bringing an impression of the true soul of the mountains to everyone. Time is symbolized in her current works in the form of birds.

Her current works are painted/drawn on un-stretched canvas predominantly, that she deliberately crumples to add texture, which is an important part of the finished artwork. Giving them a natural and free look without constraints. Using various mediums such as graphite, charcoal, ink, and acrylic combining both painting and drawing techniques to build up the artworks in layers, trying to achieve a sense of depth and translucency in her artworks.

www.jessiepitt.com

Unconventional Forms: Interview with Deane McGahan
deanemcgahan1.jpg

Interview by Alicia Puig

Deane McGahan is contemporary sculptor currently residing in the Seattle metropolitan area. As having grown up in the Northwest, her aesthetic sensibilities are deeply rooted in the region. Not only as an appeal to the natural beauty at her doorstep but the lived-in experience of people, the effectual charge of living, which Seattle and its many haunts have afforded her.

"This new body of work is inspired by the desire to create unconventional forms. Shapes that push the boundaries of the material employed. Altering what ordinarily is the solid uniformity of concrete into casts that seem pulled, stretched, in transit. To take the stone and make it rip, blend, emote. To revise what is normally the process of casting the wet matrix of concrete into a solid block. To discover instead a form that looks like a sound wave instead of a static obelisk. A reverberation rather than an inert constant.  

My aim is to create work that inspires, connects and contributes. Work that bridges the abstraction of human emotion and solid objects. If there is a message in my work, it is the suggestion that untamed feeling might be captured for a moment in the immutable. A snapshot, as it were, of flow caught in an object and held in stasis."

Detail_Raw.jpg

How did you first become interested in art and can you explain a bit of how it led you to the work you create today?

I always knew from a young age that I wanted to fully pursue art. I studied commercial art in college where I sort of fell into making video games before gaming jobs were a thing. Over the course of 25 years, I primarily worked as a 3D environment artist on AAA titles. It was a great way to make a living, but over time I felt the need to build more tangible things, made real, be effectually experienced. Shifting from 3D modeling to sculpting felt like a natural shift, as I found that the spatial awareness I developed in the digital world was applicable to the real world.

Innate_2019.jpg

Tell us about the inspiration behind your artwork or a specific series that you're currently working on.

On a high level, my inspiration fuels from how we evolve through creativity. I'm obsessed with connecting the dots of human growth and art. I have to sculpt every day or something feels wrong. It's like a raw encoded emotion in me to create or die. Capturing these feelings through new shapes and space helps me navigate life. That, and it feels damn good.

Inversion_2018.jpg

What mediums do you use and how do they add to the effect of your work?

I primarily sculpt with concrete because the medium itself connects back to my inspiration for evolving. Normally it's cast into solid blocks for function but to revise the process, experiment, and present new shapes highly influences my work. It's also not a very forgiving medium, which forces me to make lots of decisions in the moment while it's still in a workable state. Ultimately the process itself defines and continues to evolve my style.

Process01.jpg

Describe your current studio or creative space. What is most important about it or one thing that you definitely need in your work area?

My space is quite small for sculpting. I'm constantly rearranging to make room for projects. Right now I'm fine with that, as I've learned that the most important thing about a creative space is to not let it dictate your ability to move forward. I figure it out as I go.

Rapt_2019.jpg

Can you tell us about how where you reside and grew up has influenced your art?

Currently, I live in Seattle but I grew up in Portland and have been in the Pacific Northwest most of my life. The beauty of our region is a given as an influence in my work but the lived-in experiences of the people and the city really drive me.

Split_2018.jpg

Do you have any big collaborations, projects, exhibitions, etc going on during the rest of the year that you'd like to share?

I'm excited to share that I'm going to be part of the Relish group art show opening on June 7th. It's at the new 9th and Thomas building in South Lake Union. It's great to see non-traditional curated shows starting to pop up around town.

Visceral_2019.jpg
The Future of Our Planet: Interview with Nick Pedersen
Pedersen_Artwork02.jpg

Interview by Alicia Puig

Nick Pedersen is a photo-based digital artist and illustrator whose work focuses on environmental issues and political activism. He holds a BFA degree in Photography, as well as an MFA degree in Digital Imaging from Pratt Institute in New York. He has shown artwork in galleries across the country and internationally, recently including the Los Angeles Center for Digital Art, the Fleisher Art Memorial, and the NYC Affordable Art Fair. His work has been featured in numerous publications such as Vogue, Juxtapoz, Hi-Fructose, and on the covers of Photoshop User and After Capture. In the past few years, he has also completed Artist Residencies at the Banff Center in Canada, the Gullkistan Residency in Iceland, and the Starry Night Retreat in New Mexico. 

Statement 

My artwork is primarily inspired by my experience with nature and environmentalism. It is specifically motivated by my concern for the future due to the effects of climate change, sea level rise, deforestation, and many other environmental impacts humans have had on the planet. My goal with these projects is to visually depict this modern conflict between the natural world and the manmade world in interesting and provocative ways, to create elaborate, photorealistic images that carry a message of conservation and sustainability. Through my work, I want to show a glimpse into these hypothetical worlds and provide viewers a space in which to contemplate the future of our planet.

Pedersen_Artwork01.jpg

How did you first become interested in art and can you explain a bit of how it led you to the work you create today?

Growing up, I was always interested in photography, documenting my adventures in the outdoors and all the places I travelled. I got my degree in photography and started learning how to use digital tools for photo editing, which was a revelation. I realized that instead of using photography just for documentation, I could also create whatever I could imagine. I did a lot of experimentation with digital photomontage and came up with my own style and conceptual motivations. A few years later I decided to pursue an MFA degree in Digital Arts at Pratt Institute in New York to really focus on these techniques and concepts. After taking everything that I’ve learned, now I’m working on various personal projects and commissions, showing my work in a few galleries, publishing my artist books, and teaching workshops on photography and digital imaging.

Pedersen_Artwork03.jpg

Tell us about the inspiration behind your artwork or a specific series that you're currently working on.

The main inspiration for much of my artwork has been my experience with nature and environmentalism. I’m motivated by my concern for the future, due to the effects of things like climate change, sea level rise, deforestation and many other environmental impacts humans have had on the planet. My goal with these projects is to visually depict this modern conflict between the natural world and the manmade world in interesting and provocative ways, and create elaborate, photorealistic images that carry a message of conservation and sustainability. I portray this as an epic struggle and in my work these forces clash in “theatrical, post-apocalyptic battlegrounds”.

My newest series, "Floating World" is an ongoing project exploring the impending issues sea of level rise in coastal cities around the world, and depicting those most threatened by flooding in the future. With carbon emissions reaching levels not seen in 15 million years, the atmosphere is currently on course towards a ‘climate crisis’ where modern civilization could become unsustainable. From melting polar ice caps, ocean acidification, and sea level rise to historic droughts, stronger wildfires, and more extreme weather events, we are quickly approaching a strange and unpredictable future. This work explores the idea that the world as we know it might not be around forever, and questions the legacy that modern humanity will be handing down to the next generations.  

Pedersen_Artwork04.jpg

What do you hope your viewers take away from seeing your art and how do you think working in photography and digital art specifically adds to the effect of your work?

All of my artwork is created using my own photography, so after researching and sketching out ideas to work with, the next step is to photograph everything I need for the project. For much of my past work I started with images from cities on the east coast like New York, Brooklyn, and Philadelphia which was perfect to collect photos of urban decay like buildings overgrown with vines and industrial ruins. The images of animals came from the wild, zoos, aquariums, taxidermy shops, and museums of natural history. Finally, many of the landscape images came from traveling around the US and to a few different countries over the past few years to capture the best source material. Then to create my images, I use a complex process of digital imaging and each image is actually made up of about 50 or more photographs meticulously pieced together. So I spend a lot of effort building up an image, figuring out the lighting, shadows, color, and other effects to make it look realistic and seamless. Each piece is carefully planned out and created as an intricately layered construction, which gives it such a hyper-real, illustrative quality. Through this work, my main goal is to show viewers a glimpse into these hypothetical worlds that I’ve created, and provide a space to contemplate the future of our planet.

Describe your current studio or creative space. What is most important about it or one thing that you definitely need in your work area?

Last year we bought a house, so I’ve actually been working to set up a new home/studio. So far, I have a desk station for my computer equipment, a photo space with backdrops and studio lights, and a large-format printer, along with a drafting table and flat-file cabinet. The studio space is set up really well for me to create my digital photomontage pieces and then print my own limited editions of the work. A large part of my creative time is also spent taking photos out in the wilderness, at parks, museums, or travelling to get all the source material I use in my artwork. So I would say the single most important thing for my work would be my camera, because I take it with me everywhere. 

Pedersen_Artwork06.jpg

What one piece of creative or business advice would you give to your younger self?

In terms of business, it is really important to realize early on that you will be running a small business as a visual artist. I resisted that for a long time because I just wanted to create artwork, but I’ve learned a lot since then and I think I’m now at a place where I’m confident about what I’m doing with my career. Creatively, I think it is important to continuously learn new things and expose yourself to new situations so you have something relevant to respond to. I would say that the most important thing is to follow your own path, and create the artwork that you are actually interested in and care about. For me, it has been important to create artwork that is about the time I live in, that has personal meaning and raises significant questions.  

Pedersen_Artwork05.jpg

Do you have any big collaborations, projects, exhibitions, etc. going on during the rest of the year that you'd like to share?

A few weeks ago I completed a great artist residency in southern New Mexico called the Starry Night Retreat. It was a really interesting place to work, and I gathered a huge amount of new source material taken from many strange and beautiful parts of the Southwest. With this work I’m thinking about creating a new series using the expansive landscapes I photographed at the White Sand Dunes, and combining it with my other imagery from the region showing astronomical research, space exploration, and weapons testing that has been a big part of New Mexico’s history. So this year I’m taking some time away from exhibitions to focus more on researching, experimenting, and coming up with new ideas for environmental series and other projects. One big thing I’m looking forward to is that I will be a Visiting Artist at Pratt Institute coming up this fall, where I will be doing guest lectures and critiques for the Digital Arts Department. 

Stay tuned for new work, and feel free to follow me at: 

https://nick-pedersen.com

https://www.instagram.com/nick_pedersen

https://www.behance.net/nickpedersen

Complexity Through Minimal Expression: Interview with Yihong Hsu
IMG_8922-F.jpg

Yihong Hsu has an interesting multi-cultural background. She was born in Seoul, Korea as 3rd generation Chinese immigrants. She received American education since elementary school to college. She now lives permanently in Hong Kong.

 Yihong Hsu received her Bachelor of Art in Graphic Design at  Maryland Institute, College of Art, USA and later received her Master in Arts, Design Management, at International Design Advanced Studies Hongik University in Seoul, Korea.  

Her multi-national and cultural background lead her to have a successful career in design and branding industry for 18 years.

In 2018, she had a first break through as an artist, by being commissioned to do an art installation of 10 meter wide giant Panda and 7 meters tall Camellia tree - LOVE.FOUND. in Chongqing IFS mall (with co-artist Simone Carena of Italy). Ever since, she has found a new passion in contemporary art and have been painting for the past year. 

Artist Statement

Seed Series

The “Seed Series” was developed as a personal interpretation of nature and carries a deeper meaning of how that relates to us - humans. Flowers are portrayed as carriers of the seeds. All flowers carry female and male parts and thus self-reproductive. It is in all nature of things, a desire to reproduce and seeds are the beginning of that. My paintings are the exploration of seeds, seeds journey. Every seed will carry its own path, it may fall out sometime, it will one day be received, and it will grow.

Ball Series

Circles (balls) are very intriguing. They create movement and tension in the space and create odd spaces around them. They are so simple yet so powerful and I find myself using circles (balls) to interpret life, my own encounters, experiences, and emotion. Using the most minimal expression to interpret some complicated thoughts.

Interview by Alicia Puig

IMG_0393.JPG

How did you first become interested in art, and can you explain a bit of how it led you to the work you create today? 

I was a graphic designer for 18 years working in branding and advertising agencies. During those years, I always felt like there was an artist in every designer.

However, designers are very restricted, as they also have to be sensitive to the project's objectives, client's needs, market trends, etc. I was longing for freedom to express myself the way I wanted to and about things I was interested in. In 2018, I was lucky to be commissioned to do an art installation piece in Chongqing, China. A 10-meter long chrome finishing panda lying on top of Chongqing IFS shopping mall complex - named LOVE.FOUND. (co-artist Simone Carena) and a 7-meter tall metal-chrome camellia tree. During the project, which lasted one year, I did a lot of research on flowers and how to express them. I sketched a lot of camellias and ways to make it more interesting. It is during this time that I fell in love with flowers and nature and decided to quit my 18 years of career in advertising and start the journey of depicting flowers and nature. I have been painting ever since and find it very therapeutic and self-satisfying. 

IMG_9738.JPG

We love that some of your work is minimalist while other pieces have more complex layering and patterns. Can you tell us about what inspires you? 

It was a long train of thought and curiosity that led to these two very different types of paintings. I personally called them the "seed series" and "ball series." As I started to dig into and experimenting with different ways of expressing flowers, I became more curious about the anatomy of the flower. Something not everyone draws about when they draw beautiful outskirt of flowers. What I learned from the biological anatomy diagrams of flowers was that all flowers carry female and male parts and what I thought were the seeds of flowers were only pollens and that the seeds are carried deep inside the ovary and ovule. This was very intriguingand interesting to me, and it inspired me to start painting flowers always emphasizing on the seeds that they carry. I also started to imagine them all around us in nature, how they strive to survive and get transferred to other flowers, and so on. To me, it somehow reflects human life and what we go through in life. For the "ball series," it began when I started to draw a lot of circles for the "seed series." It was very fun and interesting to me how circles affect the space around it. It gives a sense of motion even in a still 2-dimensional space. It is a perfect round-edge shape but provides oddness. I was inspired to just use circles (balls) and the most minimal expression to depict this tension. When I want to tell a very complicated story and put a title to the "ball series" pieces, it makes perfect sense!

IMG_0001.JPG

What is your process like? Do you do a lot of sketching or make work more intuitively? 

I do a few sketches before just to make sure what is already in my head looks okay on flat surface. 

Describe your current studio or creative space. What is most important about it or one thing that you definitely need in your work area?

My creative space is an extra room at my place that I transformed into my workspace. There is no most important "thing" for me. I just need absolute silence and natural sunlight. I love my big window. 

What is your favorite thing about being an artist? That I can transform my thoughts and feelings into art. I don't need to organize my thoughts into PowerPoint slides and excel sheets and use fancy words to write about it. I just draw them. I feel free!

Jessica Tenbusch
Jessica_Tenbusch_5_LookingThrough.jpg

Jessica Tenbusch is inspired by the animal and plant species that live near humans. She explores the relationships between species and how they shaped her experience as a human animal. Her work is an observation on our role as ecosystem builders and destroyers. These works are fragments of our daily environment, showing just how close nature is in our everyday lives, embedded in our homes and neighborhoods. In her childhood, she shared her home with a multitude of other animals and hundreds of houseplants. Outside was always inside.

She loves to work in the spaces between two-dimensional and three-dimensional representation and uses color pencil, ink, acrylic paint, wood, metal, and found natural and man-made materials to create sculpture and works on paper.

Jessica received her BFA in 2011 and MFA in 2014 from Eastern Michigan University where she concentrated in metalsmithing and drawing. In addition to exhibiting her work nationally, she is active in the local arts community curating shows and coordinating events. She lives and works in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Her practice is located within Ypsi Alloy Studios, a 3D arts studio she co-owns and runs with two other local artists.

JessicaTenbusch_1_SuburbanEdens.jpg
JessicaTenbusch_2_PrivacyScreen.jpg
JessicaTenbusch_3_SummerSounds.jpg
JessicaTenbusch_4_AzaleaGarden.jpg
Chloe Hedden
BAHOTAA_KARAM.jpg

Chloe was born and raised in Utah's wild red desert, but has had the great fortune to call many amazing places around the world her home. A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, she is as comfortable painting large oils as she is illustrating children’s books. In 2007, She won an International Creativity award in the category of commercial illustration for “The Peaceful Warrior.” Her first children’s book, “The Illuminated Desert,” written by Terry Tempest Williams and published by the Canyonlands Natural History Association in 2008, won The Mountains and Plains Bookseller’s Award for Best Children’s Book. She currently resides in Southern Utah and makes art full time.

Statement

As an artist, Chloe looks for the unseen patterns and hidden narratives that reveal the magnificence in all things.  Robert Henri said, "Paint the spirit of the bird rather than its feathers."  There is a still point in every moment and to capture this essential luminescence is to acknowledge the ancient wisdom in all things. She makes use of archetypes from the cultural and mystical history that connects all humans and all life forms.  Joseph Campbell said that artists are the shamans of our time.  She believes that we have the ability as well as the obligation to find and share truth and offer direction to the greater community.  It is with this inspiration that She delves into the riches of the collective unconscious and the imagery and symbolism of her dreams to draw out something bigger than herself to share with the world.

CHERDI_KALA_3.jpg
MAMAN_COCHET_4.jpg
Erin Holscher Almazan
Alpha.jpg

Erin Holscher Almazan is an Associate Professor of Printmaking and Drawing at the University of Dayton in Dayton, OH.  Erin is a native of North Dakota. She received her BFA in Fine Arts from Minnesota State University Moorhead and her MFA in Printmaking from Rochester Institute of Technology, in Rochester, New York. She has completed two printmaking residencies at the Frans Masereel Centrum in Kasterlee, Belgium. Erin’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and has been included in exhibitions in connection with the Southern Graphics Printmaking Council and the Mid-America Print Council. Erin is also an active member of the Dayton art and printmaking community.  She resides in Dayton with her husband and two sons. 

Statement

My work is a direct and emotional response to identity; I am continually fascinated and perplexed by my roles and relationships. Through my work, I reflect on a malleable identity shaped not only by our own shifting environments, but also by nature, nurture, inheritance, and history. I draw, print and paint to fluidly move with and investigate form and edge and to achieve a range of gestural lines and marks. I strive to communicate acceptance, ambivalence, struggle, empathy, and connectivity, and to convey the duality embedded within our identity.

Initiation.jpg
TheOnlyWay.jpg
Hidden Nature: Interview with Darko Vuckovic
04.jpg
Talent is a good advantage, but it brings us to our goal only if nurtured through constant work.

Vuckovic was born in Podgorica, Montenegro and graduated from Faculty of Fine Arts in Cetinje in 2001, in the class of professor Dragan Karadzic, painting department.

From 1999 to 2000, he attended L’ecole Superrieure d’Art du Grenoble, France, where he started to experiment in computer-generated imagery, photography and experimental sound.

In 2012, he completed specialized studies, painting department, at the Faculty of Fine Arts in Belgrade, in the class of professor Zoran Vukovic. He has been a member of ULUCG (Association of visual artists of Montenegro) since 2002.

Soft_Form_I_-_terracotta_-_W_35_x_L_25_x_H_30cm_-_2017..jpg

The Heraldry of Nature (Imprints and Traces)

Every shape in the visible nature, the smallest as well as the biggest, is revealed as harmony. 

The Māori from Polynesia had the word “mana” for expressing the unity of things, the strong feeling that life is a unity in which not only gods, people and all living things partake, but also things that to us seem dead. “Mana” thus represents an immediate experience of the “sacred force that permeates life”. All of their art is filled with spirals as visual displays of the force. They were engraved into wood and stone, painted, or even tattooed on the body. One can find identical spiral motives in many other parts of the world, some originating from prehistoric times.

In nature we find the spiral movement in the structure of the DNA molecule, as well as in the spiral galaxies. The “murmur” of the cosmos is expressed through shape, just as fine sand placed on a string instrument makes precise geometric shapes when one plays a tone.

György Doczi, a Hungarian architect from the early 20th century, discovered the same mathematical laws at the basis of architecture, the elements of landscape, the anatomy of humans, animals and plants, the tone scale, the rhythm in poetry, prompting him to introduce the concept of a dynergic pattern“.

The displayed works have a common thread. They represent different imprints of the universal energy flow, which is visible just partly. This energy weaves tirelessly behind the curtain of the material world, maintaining it and driving it. The idea once obsessed J. W. Goethe (Essay on the plant), and later Rudolf Steiner when he speaks about the active spiritual reality, deeming it the cause of what we perceive with our outer senses. The wide field of his work and his views had a profound impact on art: the works of Kandinsky, and later Joseph Beuys, among others.

Occasionally, the hidden, dynamical and changeable nature finds its artistic expression and displays itself in physical form. That is why I consider myself only as a formal author of these works.

_Soft_form_IV_-_porcelain_-_W_50_x_L_14_x_H_10_cm_-_2018..jpg

When and how were you first introduced to working with ceramics?

I started doing ceramics about ten years ago. Considering I received a degree in painting, the main techniques of my artistic expression were drawing, painting, photo collages. A set of circumstance led to my sharing a studio with some sculptors. This was a decisive factor for my gradual shift to ceramics and getting to know its secrets. Ceramics enabled me to add a third dimension to the visual images I created. I was and still am fascinated by the possibilities it offers, which are practically inexhaustible.

Soft_Form_III_-_terracotta_-_W_21_x_L_14_x_H_23cm_-_2017..jpg

What inspires your work?

Inspiration is something that is in my case spontaneous, which arrives the moment I start communicating with the material, in this case with clay.

There are certain conditions that have a positive effect on achieving a required state of sensitivity when creativity can be expressed in the proper way.

Frequent trips to nature contribute to this state. The rhythms of nature and its changes are somewhat similar to the rhythms of the forms I create. My forms are organic and changeable, almost natural.

001.jpg

What is your process like when you start a new sculpture?

In most cases, I don’t have a clear idea and plan about what I wish to accomplish because I want to leave open the possibility of a surprise.

I allow the forms to change by their own inner rhythm and impulse. This is probably the main reasons why the technique has been holding my interest for so long. Later, after the first round of baking clay, some additional effects are made with texture and glaze, making it even more interesting. Sculptures are often baked multiple times in a row until the desired effect is achieved.

Below is the link for my short film on clay and an ancient method of sculpture making. The film was screened at the AVI Fest - Short Film Festival 2017, where it won the first prize.

002.jpg


Who are some artists that inspire you?

It used to be Hieronymus Bosch and Flemish painters. Afterward, surrealists like Max Ernst, the metaphysical painter Giorgio de Chirico, but also M.C. Escher.

As for sculptures, I am most fascinated by the sculptures by Joan Miro and some works by Joseph Beuys.

These are the artists whose work always leaves an impression on me.

03.jpg

What has been the most challenging aspect of your career thus far? How did you overcome it?

The greatest challenge is persisting in doing what one loves. It isn’t always easy. It means not compromising what one considers truly worthy of doing. Like the moment I left my steady office job as a graphic designer so I would have more time for my artwork. It often means entering a zone of economic instability. These decisions bring many questions, doubts, and dwellings, and one needs to learn how to cope with that. It becomes easier as time goes by.

01.jpg


What would you say your greatest strength is as an artist?

For me, art is something that gives meaning even at times when we cannot find it in our surrounding, in the outer world. The fact itself is encouraging and gives strength and motivation. For me, that is enough.

Soft_Form_V_-_terracotta_-_W_25_x_L_12_x_H_17_cm_-_2017..jpg


Do you have a piece of advice you have received that you would like to share with our readers?

There is good advice in the tale about Aladdin. It says that if you rub the lamp long enough, a genie will appear. The lamp represents us and our unnurtured talents. This means that if we are persistent and focused, results are inevitable. Talent is a good advantage, but it brings us to our goal only if nurtured through constant work.

Adam Hall

As a visual artist, Adam Hall began working mostly with charcoals and oils. Self taught, he attempts to mix traditional style with contemporary. Using palette knifes and layering techniques he creates a true richness and depth to his work. Adam believes every painting is his next opportunity in truly expressing his vision and vibe through landscape. “Art is such a powerful tool and I strive to use it in the most positive way I know how.” While his passion for art began growing up in Wellsburg, West Virginia, his professional artistic career began nearly a decade ago in Nashville. Adam quickly became involved with a local interior design firm whose clientele took great interest and demand for his art. His work is now featured in several galleries throughout the southeast United States. Adam Hall proudly resides in Nashville, TN, with his wife Thais. Adam spends most of his time in his studio in Nashville and continues to discover a fulfilling purpose through art.

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adamhallart/

FB page: https://www.facebook.com/adamhallart/