Posts tagged Painting
Inner Worlds: Interview with Tanner Mothershead
Mothershead, Tanner_01.jpeg
Tan.jpg

Tanner Mothershead is a midwestern born artist. He attended undergraduate school at the Northwest Missouri State University before going on to attain his MFA at the University of Iowa with an emphasis in ceramics and minors in painting and sculpture. He has exhibited work at NCECA and published in New American Paintings

A driving force in the creation of his work is a desire to make sense of both people and place. The work stems from a fascination with the human mind's ability to interpret, transform, and create the world around it. Much of the work formed acts as an apparatus for viewing and experiencing a conceptualized inner world in relationship to tangible reality.  His research delves into the functions and meanings of symbolism, spatial relations, and degrees of abstraction. Elements of Jungian psychology, philosophy, and architecture are woven together in these biomorphic surreal narratives.  

Mothershead, Tanner_02.jpeg

Briefly tell us about your current work.

My current work focuses on the relationship between physical and perceived reality, with an emphasis on the inner worlds people create either for idle pleasure or to escape traumatic experiences. Everyday in the news we hear about mass shootings and are bombarded with senseless acts of violence. I think about events that have happened to the people closest to me as well as a deeply traumatic event in my own life, the dots and lines of happenings and how they connect. The work I make becomes objects of connection. They appear outwardly as fun fantasy worlds with bright color, enticing one to look deeper. Neon doors, steps, and pathways act in contrast to darker, more sinister, elements buried further in.

Mothershead,Tanner_07.jpeg

At first glance your work looks very material based. Can you give us some insight about your use of materials?

I suspend layers of paint and other materials in transparent resin in order to form sculptural paintings. This drive stems from my compulsive desire to give physical form and depth to these imagined spaces; I wish to make more concrete the fact that the mental landscape is just as real as the one we all share. They take the shape of geoded doorways or shards, reminiscent of transitional spaces, as well as how our perceptions of reality build up over time and pressure. Most recently I have begun making them in the form of the midbrain and visual cortexes, the parts of human anatomy linking the eye to the brain. They remain as fragmentary images of places alien to outsiders and have a shallow, ghostly, topographical map stamped on its surface.

Spiritually, I work to embody elements from two notable psychotherapists, who also dabbled in creative practice: Carl Jung, who was a leading pioneer in the understanding of the inner human, and Herman Rorschach, who utilized a delicate balance of pure abstraction to that of recognizable objectivity.

Mothershead_Tanner_03.jpeg

Who in the art community inspires you?

Currently the artists I have found inspiring, and thoroughly enjoyed following their practice, have been Lauren Clay, Michael Reeder, Alex Eckman-Lawn, and Donté K. Hayes.

"My Thousand Sounds" Exhibition by Painter Adam Lee at BEERS London

BEERS London is thrilled to present My Thousand Sounds, the third solo exhibition at the gallery by esteemed Australian painter Adam Lee. The title, borrowed from Christian Wiman’s 2008 poem, A Small Prayer in a Hard Wind, suggests the notion of a divine presence amidst human fragility.

In his newest paintings, Lee continues his ongoing fascination with painting as a form of private pilgrimage. For Lee, the process of painting can be perceived as a metonym for a type of spiritual voyage. His intention is that the viewer might perceive these paintings as personal votive objects linking the familiar terrains of memory, family, and loss, with that of an uncanny yet unseen sense of corporeal transcendence. In many ways the works function as relic-like objects that house much greater sublime ideas. 

About the Artist

Adam Lee works from his studio in the hills of the Macedon Ranges, Victoria, Australia, and he works mostly with traditional painting and drawing materials. His work references a wide range of sources including historical and colonial photography, biblical narratives, natural history, and most recently seem to embody more imagined or fantastical sources, investigating aspects of the human condition in relation to ideas of temporal and supernatural worlds. There is a sort of unsettling stillness to Lee’s work, a type of peaceful disquietude, where figures are situated in strange, unearthly spaces seem to tend to their own spiritual procession. As his practice has moved from more traditional ‘landscape’ painting to a practice that incorporates more emotive, poetic and narrative qualities, the work seems laboured upon with an almost religious reverence – somewhere between RB Kitaj and Rothko, oddly enough. There is a stylization of all Lee’s forms – where the figures become almost crystallized – and the viewer senses the creative and critical processes Lee undergoes to create his distinct bodies of work. From hunters, to shamanism, to fatherhood, Lee’s themes result in an informative nucleus from which he works prolifically to create large paintings and drawings that respond to a central theme. As viewers, we become complicit to the world he creates.

Exhibition dates: October 19 - November 23, 2019

Johan Barrios Solo Exhibition, "Monólogo"

 

J O H A N  B A R R I O S

 

Monólogo

unnamed 1.jpg

 

Artist Reception: Friday, October 25, 6:00 – 8:30 pm

Anya Tish Gallery is pleased to announce Monólogo, a solo exhibition of new work by Johan Barrios, a Colombian artist now living and working in Houston. This is Barrios’ second solo exhibition with Anya Tish Gallery. Monólogo features paintings that convey the paradoxical dimensions of one-self. Barrios' work has surreal and cinematic qualities with a haunting aesthetic that is at once captivating and unsettling. 

“For me, all the pieces that are part of this project called Monólogo are the result of questioning what we call identity. All these self-portraits try to give an irrational look at how we are exposed to a symbolic solitude that distances us from any collective system. From my perspective, these figures are a replacement for a certain emotion that can often be related to fears and failures and become vulnerable to the conflicts that arise in the work itself creating a wider range of questions between image and spectators.”    - Johan Barrios

 Johan Barrios, born in 1982, is one of the most technically accomplished painters of his generation. Barrios’ work provokes the unique ability to make us feel and sympathize with his images invoking a harmony of the imagination and cognitive thought. Using himself as his own model he creates psychological portraits full of contradictions, doubt, beauty and anxiety, that exist between the surface of the canvas and trompe l’oeil illusion. Barrios pays close attention to every detail, expertly rendering muscle tone, hands, fabric wrinkles and flyaway hairs. He effortlessly translates light and shadow, executing his pieces with the proficiency of old masters. Depicted in a state of suspended tension, the subject has no identity, no narrative, no location, yet carries a diffused emotional resonance that addresses existential issues such as loneliness, self-discovery, intimacy and fragility.

Johan Barrios received his Masters in Fine Arts from the Universidad de Antioquia in Medellín, Colombia, and has since exhibited across the globe in such major cities as Zürich, Switzerland; New York City, New York; Barcelona, Spain; Cologne, Germany; Montreal, Canada; Los Angeles, California; and Denmark. His work has been featured in numerous renowned print and online publications, including ArtMaze, HI FRUCTOSE, Minus 37, The Jealous Curator, and Juxtapoz Arts and Culture Magazine.

unnamed 2.jpg
unnamed 3.jpg
unnamed 4.jpg
Storytelling Through Painting by Jazmin Donaldson
Lady_Purple_Rain (1).jpg

Jazmin Donaldson

Jazmin lives and works in London and recently graduated from the MFA Program at the Slade School of Fine Art. Recent exhibitions include The Field, ASC Gallery London, Wells Art Contemporary, Wells, Distant Heres, The Stone Space, London and Cartoons and Cereal, Offshoot Gallery, London.

 STATEMENT:

In my work I explore the idea of storytelling with painting. The stories initiate from an autobiographical point of view and then take their own form by adding fantastical elements. I am interested in the intersection between memories and fantasy. My work is influenced by the world of fairy tales and myths where I re-use already known motifs in order to tell contemporary stories and concerns. I am specifically interested in women’s role in society and change over time, how we perceive that role and what feminism means today.

I am interested in the creation of each one of the characters of the stories and what they each represent. Elements that I am interested in exploring through different imagery are themes of identity, transformation, the absurd, the nonsense and the role reversal. All of them have in common the disruption of meaning or multiple meanings, which, in the end is part of an always shifting language that I am searching for.

www.jazmindonaldson.com 

Ive_heard_it_all_before_said_Alice (1).jpg
Down_the_hole (1).jpg
An_Empty_Promise (1).jpg
Colorful and Textured Paintings Claire Whitehurst
Claire_6big (1).jpeg

Claire Whitehurst is an artist living and working in Iowa City, Iowa, where she is teaching and pursuing her MFA in Painting at the University of Iowa. She was born in Louisiana and raised in Mississippi, earning her BFA at the University of Mississippi, and a Post Baccalaureate degree from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art in Philadelphia, PA. Her work can be found in private collections throughout the United States, and abroad in France and Germany. She has permanent public commissioned installations in Jackson, Mississippi, and in St. Jude’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. She received the Stanley Foundation Grant for International Research to study the formal and sculptural qualities of cave paintings in the Dordogne region of France. Her work explores the liminality between physical and psychological relationships of sense and emotion, the characteristics within the surface of objects as a mythology, and the possibility of narrative through an object’s formal qualities.

Statement

 

Suspended in a state between representation and abstraction, my pictures rely on the surfaces from which they appear for context inside of a structure of color, texture, and symbol. The surfaces often dictate the images that are produced – leaving some room for a sense of autonomy. I’m interested in the boundaries of clarity and misunderstanding, and how those boundaries react to our reliance on the arrangements of symbols and characteristics inside of our own of logic and sense-making. The psychic distance between a viewer and an object can change and pivot depending on what associations their environments provide at any point in time. The tertiary space that follows where logic and idea manipulate is where I’m most interested and engaged. The possibility for an image to confuse and describe simultaneously is what I want out of the images I make.

www.caoimhediamondartist.com

11 (1).jpg
speaking (1).jpg
Realistic Paintings Utilizing Projection by Hali Pollard
heres_a_sign.jpg

Hali Pollard is a recent graduate from Stetson University with her Bachelor's of Art in Studio Art and Communication and Media Studies. Her work has been exhibited in Stetson's 28th and 29th Annual Juried Undergraduate Art Show in 2017 and 2018, where she won the Friends of Art Purchase Award. 

 

Hali presented her Senior Studio Art Thesis Exhibition, Layers, at Stetson University's Student Showcase, where she was awarded the Maris Award Runner-Up. Her piece "Here's a sign," from her exhibition won the Ann Hall Award and now belongs to Stetson University's permanent collection. There are currently two pieces of Hali's that now belong to the permanent collection.

 

Her work aims to elevate the darker side of romantic relationships and associated feelings using projections of light, color, and text. She utilizes the element of projection and dramatic lighting to create layers of meaning on her subjects. Using realistic methods of painting, Hali creates loosely written narratives that come across as familiar but undoubtedly leave questions unanswered.

Self-Expression and Healing in the Abstract Paintings by Svitlana Martynjuk
20190804_155351.jpg

The use of powerful colors within my work has been an important part of my own healing and learning process. Every speckle, every brush stroke has purpose in the exploration of self and tells a story through the safe space of each canvas. My history, my culture, my purpose. An identity lost amongst the expectations of society and its constant mislabeling of body and meaning. I represent these struggles and my existence through a vibrant palette to show not only the freedom to exist as I am, but to find joy in these tangled emotions and portray the brighter side of letting go.

About

Svitlana Martynjuk was born and raised in the beautiful western capital region of Rivne, Ukraine. The memories of her great-grandmother’s quaint cottage home, nestled in the quiet Ukrainian countryside, bring to her many fond emotions and influence much of her work today.

Svitlana’s interest in art has been born the second she remembered sitting on her mom’s lap as a child, drawing with a blue pencil. She later would move to the United States where she completed her education in Fine Arts, Psychology, and Strategic Management. Inspired by the human mind and with a fascination for nature, she is a traveler at heart and appreciates experience through interaction and exploring the complexities of diversity in people. Her work is in private collections all over the world and includes a wide array of commissioned pieces, published book illustrations, and collaborations with both West Elm, Minted, to name a few.

Color Pops by Su Knoll Horty
Color Pops 25, Oil on canvas, 24in. x 24in., Lo-res_.jpg

Color. Form. Space. Once only childish playmates, this tempestuous trio has become a passion for Su Knoll Horty.  Her love of bold colors and abstracted space has been inspired by the work of Nicolas de Staël, Josef Albers, Richard Diebenkorn and David Hockney. Exploring the power of color to elicit emotion, Su sees it as her task to convey the exuberance she feels when working with the saturated colors in her painting. She is also fascinated by the spatial dimensions, which can develop through the relationship of colors.  That’s passion. Once you’re in its Jack Russell grip, there’s no shaking it off – no matter where life takes you.

In 2012, Su completed the CE Core Curriculum Program at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (Pafa). Su continues with Master Classes at Pafa. She received an Award of Merit by Manhattan Arts International in the online exhibition of The Healing Power of Art 2019. Su is a member of the Philadelphia Sketch Club and received two Honorable Mention awards for her entries in the Absolutely Abstract shows, in 2012 and 2013 as well as being a juror in the 2015 Absolutely Abstract Show. Su exhibits regularly and has exhibited in numerous solo and group shows, including The Biggs Museum of American Art. Her work is held in the Camden County Art Bank in New Jersey and in numerous private collections.

Su Knoll Horty is represented by Bluestone Fine Art Gallery in Old City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and has recently exhibited at SOMA NewArt Gallery in Cape May, New Jersey.  From 2012 until 2019, Su displayed her paintings in Senator Chris Coons’ Washington, D.C. office.

Artist Statement:

Moving beyond the stain to a more fluid style of painting is what’s on my mind these days. The paint stain is still there during the inception of a painting, but it is more of a building block than a final presentation of schematic color. Gone too, for the moment, are the straight edges. I’m exploring fluidity, in all its measures: organic form, undulating movement, saturated ‘liquid’ color, and stylized gestural marks. It’s through fluidity that I find color to be most expressive. The challenges of creating visual depth through vibrant color, along with subtle and not so subtle shifts in tone are the things exciting me now in the studio, The depth and unexpected form that comes from working with intense color is giving me tremendous satisfaction and leading me into intriguing directions.

Color relationships are still important to me, as are tonal variations. With highly saturated pigments, building form through variation in tone is possible in new ways and presents a deeper ambiguity of space in my work. This ambiguity allows viewers to find what they will in my paintings. This is important to me because I want my viewers to find something they relate to in my work, making each viewing experience unique. 

My latest works offer an intriguing spectacle of color and form, which I call Color Pops.

Website: www.suknollhorty.com

Instagram: @su_knoll_horty

E-mail: sckh@comcast.net

Inspiration from the Ordinary | Artist Danielle Biglin
3_sardines.jpg

South Florida based artist, Danielle Biglin, has been painting since the early 90’s.  Her work started in watercolor landscapes and has evolved into little gouache paintings and drawings of found objects, household items, and sardines...she loves their dopey faces.  Danielle finds inspiration from and brings life to the ordinary and mundane.  Her work has been shown at the A.E. Backus House in Fort Pierce, Florida and Second House in Montauk, New York. 

Contemporary Vanitas and Memento Mori Art by Michele Melcher
LadywithaRosary.jpg

Michele Melcher is an artist living in Carversville, a historic area of Southeastern Pennsylvania. She attended The University of the Arts in Philadelphia, receiving a BFA in Illustration in 1997. For the past 15 years, she has worked as a freelance illustrator specializing in advertising, editorial, and portraiture. All the while she has participated in gallery shows working in several different mediums including watercolor, pen and ink, graphite and most recently, oil.

Her latest paintings pay homage to the decadence of 18th and 19th-century portrait masters as well as her interest in vanitas and memento mori art. 

Statement

The series,“Dead Masters”, pays homage to my interest in 18th and 19th century portraiture as well as vanitas and memento mori art. My background in illustration includes a lot of editorial work, a large percentage of that being portraiture. Much of that is straight to the point, representational digital portraiture and at times, dry. While transitioning mediums and teaching myself oils I was delighted by the pure decadence with which some of the aforementioned painters represented their subjects. I love the larger-than-life hairstyles, lavish clothing and opulent accessories. In regard to vanitas and memento mori art: it’s fascinating to learn about the images and symbolism of these two sometimes misunderstood genres as well as the pure scientific aspect of studying and drawing the workings of the human skeleton.

 

Instagram @michelemelcherillustration

Facebook @michelemelcherillustration

Twitter @michelemelcherillustration

Atefeh Baradaran, Contemporary Artist Exploring Geometry, Depth and Flat Surfaces
Atefeh_Baradaran_AGradientEscape.jpeg

Atefeh Baradaran is an Iranian Canadian artist based in Vancouver, Canada. She holds a BFA from Emily Carr University of Art + Design (2016). Throughout her practice, she has explored various disciplines, including painting, drawing, sculpture, and ceramics and her work remains continually informed by the mall. Atefeh has an inclination towards hard-edged geometric patterns and process-oriented work. Shedraws inspiration from intentional and accidental compositions present in her surroundings. Her abstract work often presents methodically produced designs that are playfully combined with unexpected elements of disruption.

Time and time again, I find myself attracted to exploring the tension in dualities, transitional states, and binary opposites within art. Painting, in particular, becomes fascinating when we acknowledge its conflicting attributes. The use of paint to portray depth on a two dimensional (and traditionally rectangular) surface has been the subject of both praise and criticism throughout history; Techniques practiced by academic painters to create 'realistic' imagery have been abandoned by modernist painters who viewed illusion as dishonest to the flatness of the surface and the materiality of paint. While the discourse itself remains unresolved, incidentally this serves to maintain relevance in informing much of today's art practice.

In my recent body of work, the focus is placed upon the tension created by combining visual depth and the flat surface together. I aim to activate the physical, visual and conceptual spaces that inherently exist within a painting: the space confined by the frame, the surface plane, and the illusionistic space of the image. In doing so, I allow these elements to break out of their conventional roles and find their own unique voice—a liberation. This tectonic play with the structure places the work in an ambivalent state between painting and sculpture.

Create! Magazine Issue 16 Contents
issue16-2.jpg

We are pleased to announce the release of Create! Magazine Issue 16!

Please refresh this page in your browser if you are not seeing the product or add to cart feature.

Human Imagination Explored in the Portraits by Erin Armstrong
EchoPark_Erin_Armstrong.jpeg

Erin is a contemporary figurative artist working and living in Toronto, CA. Her work looks into the human imagination as it is expressed visually. She is particularly intrigued by the ways in which the mind can conjure and create worlds by piecing together memory, experience, and the ability of the mind’s eye to render a non-reality. She draws on the genre of portraiture as a foundation for these explorations, but chooses to depict not a person or sitter, but an atmosphere or sensation expressed inside the formal qualities of human shapes. 

Her work has been exhibited extensively throughout Canada and the US as well as England, Australia, Scotland, Switzerland, and Sweden. She is currently working towards two upcoming solo shows in Seattle and Geneva in 2019. 

Select features include: Nylon Magazine, House and Home Magazine, ShopBop, Its Nice That, Domino, Cultured Magazine, The Jealous Curator.

Select clients/projects include: Nike, Anthropologie, The Drake Hotel, Portia De Rossi’s "General Public Art", Hulu’s “The Handmaids Tale”, Saatchi Limited.

erinarmstrongart.com

Studio Sunday: Samantha Boni
Screen Shot 2019-07-22 at 4.54.53 PM.png

This Sunday’s feature gives you a behind the scenes peek into the studio practice of one of our PxP Contemporary invited artists, Samantha Boni. Based in Italy, she creates stunning landscapes and is inspired by nature and the freedom associated with being an artist. Learn more in her interview below and then check out her two affordable paintings available with our gallery through our first exhibition Pilot. The show is only up for a few more weeks so don’t miss out on the chance to collect her work or one of the many other incredible artists we curated for this inaugural show!

Bio

Samantha Boni was born in Modena, Italy. After studying languages at school, she took painting lessons from Italian maestro Alberto Cavallari and then attended the antiques restoration school, La Bottega del Restauro, in Modena for four years. At the same time, she started her career as a professional painter.

Screen Shot 2019-07-22 at 4.54.32 PM.png

When did you first become interested in art?

I have always been interested in art. I started painting when I was a child and developed this passion through my teen years. Then I discovered restoration and studied al fresco techniques for years.

Tell us about what inspires you creatively.

I am inspired by nature and its light, what hits my eyes and gives me feelings or emotions.

What is your process like?

I am working on a series of abstract paintings about water and its energy. I use palette techniques and I feel that there’s something therapeutic about it - strength, energy, anger, fury, happiness and sadness all together.

Screen Shot 2019-07-22 at 4.54.23 PM.png

Describe your current studio space. What is most important about it or one thing that you can’t live without in your work area?

My studio is a well lit room with sketches everywhere. When I work I really need silence, like being closed in my favorite bubble.

What is one piece of advice that has stuck with you or a quote that you think is especially meaningful?

Art is freedom. Try, try, try and try again.

Are there any exciting exhibitions, projects, or collaborations going on this year that you’re currently working on or will be soon?

I’ve been focusing on my series of abstract landscapes. It’s a new mission to me. At the moment, I also have an exhibition in Italy at the Villa the Moll and I’m really proud to be part of your project PxP Cpntemporary.

London-based artist, Laurence Jones, to have solo exhibition at Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery
’Night Pool', 210 x 180cm, Acrylic on Linen, 2019-2000px.jpg

How To Live In Los Angeles is an exhibition of fifteen new paintings by London-based artist, Laurence Jones, that focus on psychologi-cal space, and play with ideas of narrative and the cinematic in art.

The paintings, derived from first and second-hand photographic images of Los Angeles, combine reimagined modernist interiors and intense vibrant hues, blurring the boundaries between real and imaginary. Silent swimming pools and silhouetted palm fronds dominate the landscape, and the dazzling rays of a simulated sunset threaten to overwhelm us.

Jones’s work, of great formal elegance and technical mastery, asks questions about how one reads and consumes images, and how one makes them in the era dominated by photographic representation.

A signed print publication with full colour reproductions of all work in the show will accompany the exhibition.

Please join us at the Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery, 2a Conway Street, Fitzroy Square, London, W1T 6BA.

Laurence Jones: How to Live in Los Angeles 1 October - 2 November 2019

www.rebeccahossack.com