Posts tagged Painting
Studio Sunday: Samantha Morris

It’s Sunday and you know what that means - another behind-the-scenes look at one of the artists from our community! This week we’re so excited to be sharing a brief interview with Samantha Morris, who we’ve had the pleasure of working with on our very first exhibition with PxP Contemporary.

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Bio

Samantha Morris was born in 1995 and grew up in Madison, Connecticut; she now lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Morris graduated from The University of the Arts in 2017 with a BFA in Fine Arts with an emphasis in Painting and Drawing. In addition, she will begin her graduate studies in the MFA Fine Arts program at Pratt Institute in September 2019. Recent solo exhibitions include:  Kanna Rými, Listhús Gallery in Ólafsfjörður, Iceland; and BFA Thesis Exhibition, The Space Between, The University of the ArtsSelected group exhibitions include Black and White, Site:Brooklyn, Practice: In Progress, NARS Foundation, and Space Invaders, Fountain Street Gallery among others. Morris’ work has been published in FreshPaint Magazine, Opción Magazine, ArtMaze Magazine, and Underground Pool.

Statement

In my artwork, I focus on the idea of an individual traveling through a space; exploring place through architecture and landscape, abstracted through line, shadow pattern, contrast, and negative space. I am interested in dynamics, what can and can’t be seen. The seemingly mundane aspects of everyday life, one light shining through the square of a window frame, or the corner of a plant casting shadow on glass. Influenced by photography and film, my work investigates the stillness of night; the frozen moments before something happens. It exists in the “in between”, the time when your eyes adjust to the contrast of natural illuminated light and the depth of darkness. I feel immersed, traveling through such spaces. Each piece has reference to an environment, while existing in its own space.

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How did you first become interested in art and can you explain a bit of how it led you to the work you create today?I have been passionate about art for as long as I can remember. I knew that it was what I wanted to pursue, which led me to earn my BFA from University of the Arts. There, I was able to develop my artistic practice that now informs the work I create today.

Describe your current studio or working area. What is most important about it or one thing that you definitely need in your creative space?

Right now I have a studio at NARS (New York Artist Residencies and Studios) in Brooklyn, NY. The most important aspect of my studio is having expansive wall space. I’m currently working on large wooden panels directly on the wall, which gives me the ability to step back and view my paintings from a distance. It’s also very important for me to have reference material surrounding me in the studio. This can range from drawings, collages, photos, and film stills, all of which inform my work.

Tell us about the inspiration behind your paintings.

In my artwork, I focus on the idea of an individual traveling through a space; exploring place through architecture and landscape, abstracted through line, shadow pattern, contrast, and negative space. I am interested in dynamics, what can and can’t be seen. Influenced by photography and film, my work investigates the stillness of night; the frozen moments before something happens. It exists in the “in between”, the time when your eyes adjust to the contrast of natural illuminated light and the depth of darkness. The work is influenced by Scandinavian architecture, from experiences in Iceland and Norway. Each piece has reference to an environment, while existing in its own space.

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What is your process like? Do you do a lot of sketching or make work more intuitively?

All of the work I create comes from places I have experienced first-hand. I start by using photography as documentation and reference, then drawing and collage to explore composition and space, which then translates into paintings on panel. I pay attention to the differences between being in an actual physical space, experiencing a photograph of that place, and then finally creating, and experiencing that space through a form of rendered imagery such as painting or drawing.

Do your works often undergo a lot of changes before you consider them complete? How long does a piece take?

I have found that painting with oil on panel most successfully captures the concept of the work. It allows me to build passages of color through the use of mediums and thin transparent layering. Through this process, a sense of internal light emerges from the work. Changes occur throughout the act of making, and painting in this way can take weeks, working in layers and accounting for drying times. I consider a painting complete when the space is compelling, and asks the viewer to enter into it through the depths of light and dark within the subtle differences in tone and value.

Are there any exciting exhibitions, projects, or collaborations going on this year that you’re currently working on or will be soon?

I am showing work in the exhibition Collage, at Site:Brooklyn from June 14th - July 13th in Brooklyn, NY, as well as Paperworks, at b.j spoke gallery in Huntington, NY from August 1st - 28th in Huntington, NY. I will also be exhibiting work in the MFA Welcome Back Show at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY from September 16th - October 10th.

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Rebecka Skog
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Born in Sweden, Stockholm in 1986.

She likes to travel, discover other cultures and fixation by all the colors found in culinary dishes, in music, and in any artistic discipline.

Rebecka has exhibited in different European cities, (London, Madrid, Barcelona, Vienna) and publications in magazines such as Elle, Cosmopolitan and Marie Claire.

She is currently living between the Canary Islands and Copenhagen working on different projects.

www.rebeckaskog.com

“Potholes" by Los Angeles-based artist Henry Fey
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First Amendment Gallery is pleased to announce, “Potholes,” a new solo exhibition by Los Angeles-based artist, Henry Fey. Fey’s latest collection of works incorporate acrylic painting and image transfers of the artist’s photographs in an engaging installation of twenty-four 8x10 inch pieces, a departure from his previously exhibited large-scale paintings.

For “Potholes,” Fey uses his signature blend of digital and analog processes to simulate a visual journey of a casual ride through a cityscape. Individually, the works recall innocuous colors and textures that seamlessly flow into another to then be punctuated by abrupt darkness - a pothole that only disrupts your journey momentarily before sending you back on track. Collectively, these examinations recontextualize familiar forms with the framed works acting as windows into particular moments of that ride.

Henry Fey (b. 1993) is an artist and San Francisco Art Institute alum living and working in Los Angeles. Using painting as a tool, he draws from his surroundings and recontextualizes images through abstraction.

For further inquiries on the artist or available works, please contact info@1amsf.com.

Solo Exhibition by Artist Danielle Krysa at Mayberry Fine Art
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By Ekaterina Popova

Artist Danielle Krysa has been busy in the studio this year, and it shows. I have always been a fan of her collage work, but most recently she took her studio practice on a whole other level and released a solo exhibition filled with large scale paintings and mixed media pieces that will inspire you, take your breath away and even make you laugh.

Danielle's work is on view at Mayberry Fine Art from June 1 - June 28, 2019. To purchase or inquire about available work visit www.mayberryfineart.com or email toronto@mayberryfineart.com

Danielle's Statement:

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There are, and always have been, a ridiculous number of stories in my head - stories I tell myself, stories I share out loud, and stories that become my mixed media collages. My most recent work takes those narratives a little further, inviting the viewer into my mind. There are messes and moments of pure joy that exist in an ‘artist’s chaotic and abstract world. There are also quiet white spaces – completely void of ideas – but then somehow, someway the creative machine starts churning again. A juicy stroke of paint in the perfect hue, or just the right found image and, voila, joy is restored! These artworks are a glimpse into the never-ending treasure hunt that goes on in my head – a combination of humor, personal thoughts, rich textures, found images and vibrant color.
— Danielle Krysa

Danielle is the writer behind the contemporary art site, The Jealous Curator, and the author of "Creative Block", "Collage", "Your Inner Critic Is A Big Jerk" and "A Big Important Art Book". Her work is in private collections in Canada, The United States and Europe. She has a BFA in Visual Arts, and a post-grad in graphic design and lives with her family in British Columbia.

Complexity Through Minimal Expression: Interview with Yihong Hsu
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Yihong Hsu has an interesting multi-cultural background. She was born in Seoul, Korea as 3rd generation Chinese immigrants. She received American education since elementary school to college. She now lives permanently in Hong Kong.

 Yihong Hsu received her Bachelor of Art in Graphic Design at  Maryland Institute, College of Art, USA and later received her Master in Arts, Design Management, at International Design Advanced Studies Hongik University in Seoul, Korea.  

Her multi-national and cultural background lead her to have a successful career in design and branding industry for 18 years.

In 2018, she had a first break through as an artist, by being commissioned to do an art installation of 10 meter wide giant Panda and 7 meters tall Camellia tree - LOVE.FOUND. in Chongqing IFS mall (with co-artist Simone Carena of Italy). Ever since, she has found a new passion in contemporary art and have been painting for the past year. 

Artist Statement

Seed Series

The “Seed Series” was developed as a personal interpretation of nature and carries a deeper meaning of how that relates to us - humans. Flowers are portrayed as carriers of the seeds. All flowers carry female and male parts and thus self-reproductive. It is in all nature of things, a desire to reproduce and seeds are the beginning of that. My paintings are the exploration of seeds, seeds journey. Every seed will carry its own path, it may fall out sometime, it will one day be received, and it will grow.

Ball Series

Circles (balls) are very intriguing. They create movement and tension in the space and create odd spaces around them. They are so simple yet so powerful and I find myself using circles (balls) to interpret life, my own encounters, experiences, and emotion. Using the most minimal expression to interpret some complicated thoughts.

Interview by Alicia Puig

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How did you first become interested in art, and can you explain a bit of how it led you to the work you create today? 

I was a graphic designer for 18 years working in branding and advertising agencies. During those years, I always felt like there was an artist in every designer.

However, designers are very restricted, as they also have to be sensitive to the project's objectives, client's needs, market trends, etc. I was longing for freedom to express myself the way I wanted to and about things I was interested in. In 2018, I was lucky to be commissioned to do an art installation piece in Chongqing, China. A 10-meter long chrome finishing panda lying on top of Chongqing IFS shopping mall complex - named LOVE.FOUND. (co-artist Simone Carena) and a 7-meter tall metal-chrome camellia tree. During the project, which lasted one year, I did a lot of research on flowers and how to express them. I sketched a lot of camellias and ways to make it more interesting. It is during this time that I fell in love with flowers and nature and decided to quit my 18 years of career in advertising and start the journey of depicting flowers and nature. I have been painting ever since and find it very therapeutic and self-satisfying. 

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We love that some of your work is minimalist while other pieces have more complex layering and patterns. Can you tell us about what inspires you? 

It was a long train of thought and curiosity that led to these two very different types of paintings. I personally called them the "seed series" and "ball series." As I started to dig into and experimenting with different ways of expressing flowers, I became more curious about the anatomy of the flower. Something not everyone draws about when they draw beautiful outskirt of flowers. What I learned from the biological anatomy diagrams of flowers was that all flowers carry female and male parts and what I thought were the seeds of flowers were only pollens and that the seeds are carried deep inside the ovary and ovule. This was very intriguingand interesting to me, and it inspired me to start painting flowers always emphasizing on the seeds that they carry. I also started to imagine them all around us in nature, how they strive to survive and get transferred to other flowers, and so on. To me, it somehow reflects human life and what we go through in life. For the "ball series," it began when I started to draw a lot of circles for the "seed series." It was very fun and interesting to me how circles affect the space around it. It gives a sense of motion even in a still 2-dimensional space. It is a perfect round-edge shape but provides oddness. I was inspired to just use circles (balls) and the most minimal expression to depict this tension. When I want to tell a very complicated story and put a title to the "ball series" pieces, it makes perfect sense!

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What is your process like? Do you do a lot of sketching or make work more intuitively? 

I do a few sketches before just to make sure what is already in my head looks okay on flat surface. 

Describe your current studio or creative space. What is most important about it or one thing that you definitely need in your work area?

My creative space is an extra room at my place that I transformed into my workspace. There is no most important "thing" for me. I just need absolute silence and natural sunlight. I love my big window. 

What is your favorite thing about being an artist? That I can transform my thoughts and feelings into art. I don't need to organize my thoughts into PowerPoint slides and excel sheets and use fancy words to write about it. I just draw them. I feel free!

Wenyan Xu
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Wenyan Xu began her career in art almost twenty years ago as a BFA student studying in the Academy of Art & Design, Tsinghua University, a top art college in China. In order to further understand contemporary art, she journeyed across continents to study art in the United States. Having completed her M.A. in the Art and Visual Culture Education Program at the University of Arizona, she focused on her artistic process and production. Through the M.F.A. painting program at Indiana University in Bloomington, she is fulfilling her artistic dream. Her paintings had been shown nationally and internationally, including at the National Art Museum of China (NAMOC), China; the Verum Ultimum Art Gallery, Portland, OR, U.S.A; and the M.A.D Gallery, Milan, Italy.

Statement

My current body of work is about space-time and emotion. Through my painting, I invite viewers to experience a journey from space to time, to engage in the interweaving of emotion and reality, and to be aware of spiritual energy versus the limits of daily life.

Space-time is a physics concept, which describes the universe with the three dimensions of space and the one dimension of time. We usually think that we are not able to live beyond space-time and are only subject to reality, yet never realized that our emotions can change the track that we go through. The human emotion is historical, interrelated, spontaneous, unarticulated and passionate in my painting. Emotion, as an innermost power of human, has been spreading the energy throughout human history and contributing to our civilization. How much do we give credit to this internal motivation? Instead, knowledge, skills, and intelligence are regarded as main drivers for the development of society. In my opinion, knowledge, skills, and intelligence can only build a world in three dimensions. Their product can last and add up throughout the length of time but cannot exceed it. However, emotion can go beyond space and time. It can outreach the world of four dimensions, target a location in the chaos of four-dimensional space, and then build a time tunnel, which you had not anticipated but would go later on in your life. Therefore, emotion has a different dimension with reality in my work. It also has potential energy to change reality, the world in three dimensions.

The reality is abrupt and rational, devoting itself to breaking down and rebuilding our emotions. I abstract marks and symbols from daily life to display a sober and unordered present. They represent rules and laws unassociated with personal emotions.

www.wenyanxu.org

Studio Sunday: Seth Remsnyder

We’re so excited to be bringing you a Studio Sunday feature with Seth Remsnyder!

My current body of work is titled: “Signage”. These are paintings on metal pieces like signs. The paintings are non-representational works focused on color, arrangement and movement. Some are placed on sign posts and installed in the public to play off of the signage that covers our communities. The intent of this body of work is to place serious works of visual art in a public context that deals with the concept of taking notice of the world around us. Signage is intended to grab the attention. So is visual art. The difference is often the context. Why do we so often miss what we are supposed to see when we are out in the world? Is the benefit of visual art in the public space the benefit of helping us remember how to see? I propose that it is. My current work aims to play off of the concept of signage to confront the public with visual art work in the public spaces that we traverse and all too often ignore. Perhaps most important is the basic idea that works such as these hold the possibility of brightening the days of the residents of our communities.

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How did you first become interested in art and can you explain a bit of how it led you to the work you create today?

I became interested in art when I was about 9 or so? I liked to draw well before that but my Mom stashed a little post Impressionism/Impressionism catalogue in her magazine rack and I saw a painting by Vincent van Gogh called “Stairway at Auvers” and I was blown away. I tried to paint a lot after seeing that. I think I know how to say it better now than I could have when I was younger but I looked at “Stairway at Auvers”, it was unreal, almost cartoonish in a very good way, but also, so real, so tangible, and dense that I felt like I was there with him. I never thought a picture could make me feel as strongly as that one did. I still get chills when I look at it. If you’re reading this, look it up.

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We love that your work is so bold and colorful. Can you tell us about what inspires you and what inspired your series of metal painted signs specifically?

Well, van Gogh absolutely drove me to just go after color and to not be afraid of it so I think that was very formative for my approach to a palette... Perception is such an important part of life... attentiveness to what is going on around us or passing us by, and with my current body of work I am really getting a lot of imagination material from horizons that I see. Sunsets and sunrises and the stuff of life that’s kind of all crammed underneath the skyline is what I imagine most when I’m painting the lines in my work. So, if I see a certain gradient in the sky I try to amplify it a little as a backdrop for the lines I’m painting. I also just tend to think in masses of color so sometimes I just spray down a color and stare at it for a while and see what it reminds me of or what other colors it calls to mind. It never ceases to amaze me the way our minds make connections to certain colors. Another inspiration for the motifs, the lines and the compositions I’m making with them, is a sort of visualization of relationships. We travel along through life with other people, cross paths etc. and so I’m often painting two lines at a time together and then basing the rest of a piece off of those interactions. I think that we think of life in a very linear way... I don’t means straightforward, but rather, the concept in general. I think we all tend to see ourselves going through life in a kind of GPS kind of way. We imagine ourselves going places and we think of life as a path and that concept really interests me. I think lines are really an endlessly interesting motif.

What is your process like?

My process has changed a lot with the current work I’m doing. Spray paint and air brush removes a certain kind of control that I had spent a lot of time developing with a brush and I am really enjoying that. It has helped me forget myself in an important way. I was always very emotionally connected to the brush, the romance of an expressionist stroke runs deep with me so detaching myself from the work with spray has helped me think more clearly about my paintings. I’m more in tune with the formal elements now I think. Process is a strange thing... it always has to start with something metaphysical, as in, what got me working on a given day... and then its a matter of either improvising or trying to fulfill a plan. With my public work I’m really focusing on a certain kind of place to put my work. I want them to be in spaces that are easily visible but neglected. We don’t always see what we’re supposed to see when we’re out and about and we could probably go on all day about why that is but this work is meant to just go straight at a solution to that... namely, putting serious paintings in a signage form and trying to snag the eyes of passers by. I pay more attention to my world when I think I might be missing art along the way.

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Describe your current studio or creative space. What is most important about it or one thing that you definitely need in your work area?

My current studio is on the first floor of my house. I love it. It’s fairly well lit and my family is around. I don’t need much space right now but I am really grateful for what I have... right now at least it’s more than enough.  Music is important to me, I kind of like everything. I do sometimes like to paint without it because the background noise of my kids watching Scooby Doo Where Are You or the old Batman TV show is such a happy kind prof background noise to me. Or, they’ll get caught up in such a good little kid jam session just playing some imaginary game together, my seven year old daughter playing with my three year old is the sweetest noise I can think of. They’re pretty hilarious too so I just listen to them and laugh while I work. One thing I definitely need is a pot of coffee. I’ve been burning the candle at both ends for too many years now and that’s my need I guess.

What is your favorite thing about being an artist?

My favorite thing about being as artist is the way that it has helped me learn to use my eyes. I’ve been really fortunate to pursue my Masters Degree in painting at the Savannah College of Art and Design over the past few years and I think the most important skill I’m leaving there with is a vastly improved ability to take notice of my world, the ability to really use my eyes and take things in. I’m so glad for that. I think it’s also helped me sharpen my memories too. I can remember colors from my childhood better now. I know that sounds strange but I think it’s true.

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Do you have any big collaborations, projects, exhibitions, etc going on during the rest of the year that you'd like to share?

The big things going on for me right now: I graduate on Friday, May 31st!! I’ll be in Savannah to walk and get my degree! Who knows, maybe I’ll leave some signage behind too... My thesis exhibition is in Richmond, Virginia on Friday, June 7 at Gallery Edit on Broad Street and I’m excited to install this show. Last but not least, my wife and I added our fourth child to our family at the end of April!  His name is Hank and he’s the sweetest little guy. Mom and baby are both doing well. Oh yeah, getting picked up by PxP of course. Grateful.

Browse Seth’s available works with PxP Contemporary.

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Joey Slaughter
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Joey Slaughter earned his BFA from Memphis College of Art and his MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art. Upon graduating Cranbrook, Slaughter was awarded the Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Grant. He has also received the Louisiana Division of the Arts Career Enhancement Grant (2012). Slaughter has exhibited widely throughout the US in both solo and group exhibitions. His work has been published in Fresh Paint and in New American Paintings magazine three times. In 2017, Slaughter was awarded the Louisiana Prize from South Arts and received the Sam and Adele Golden Foundation residency. In 2018, had a solo show at Cole Pratt Gallery in New Orleans and attended Hambidge Residency in Georgia. In 2019 he will attend the Crosstown Arts Residency in Memphis and Joan Mitchell Residency in New Orleans.  He currently lives in Ruston, LA, and is Associate Professor of Art at Louisiana Tech University. 

Statement

I am interested in the sending and receiving of information.  I wonder how a simple conversation is absorbed between people, how they’re connected, and what the conversational wavelengths would look like. The main idea is to create abstractions from conversations if you could see sound waves from analog and digital devices passing through and around people. I imagine it to be very chaotic, yet beautiful.

My work is purposefully busy in reference to the busy-ness in our lives. Our thoughts are busy, and I’ve long been interested in what a thought process looks like in the brain, imagining firings of color and structure. I see my works as explosions of thoughts, snippets of conversations, weavings of words and lyrics – a visualization of communication.

The iconic speech bubble is a confined space that conveys communication. I am using a similarly contained white space of the panel to insert colored bursts with embedded depictions of this information. While I work, I pick through mentally archived phrases and dwell on them, building them in layers of paint and wood. Silence and pauses are important to me as well, evidenced by the negative space.

Sebastian Riffo Montenegro
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Chilean visual artist that also currently works as an Art Director in Marketing and Advertising. He maintains a solid production of artworks that criticize consumer society and socially constructed beliefs. Faceless figures in raincoats maneuver through deconstructed color-field backgrounds. Working with a selective palette and controlled lighting, reveals the intent of his work through veils of lucid colors and mysterious forms. Absence presents clear criticism of social mores, the paintings provoke the need to discern new meaning and awaken the tacit human condition of free will.

www.riffomontenegro.com

Adolfo Gutierrez
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Salvadoran-American artist, Adolfo Gutierrez (b.1992), creates art that forces its audience to look beyond the lines and colors, in order to break apart the stories told in a language reminiscent of hieroglyphics. These symbols serve as visual metaphors, describing the conflicts occurring in Latin American countries that have caused their citizens to leave their homes, the hardships of departure, the process of migration, and arrival in a new country with different customs and conflicts. It explores the notion of finding a home away from home and the unknown stories of those who have come to the US. His color palette draws on the exteriors of homes found across Latin America and is a reminder of his roots.

www.adolfogutierrez.net

The Stranger, Solo Exhibition by Alex Merritt at Booth Gallery
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Booth Gallery is proud to present The Stranger, a debut solo exhibition by Alex Merritt, on view May 17 - June 12, 2019, at 325 W. 38th St in New York. Popularly known for his large-scale oils and brutal approach to painting, Alex Merritt will be exhibiting 20 new paintings and drawings in large and small formats.

Merritt’s works include a recurring motif visualized through expansive landscapes juxtaposed by isolated figures which directly confront the viewer. In works like “Hermetic Bliss” (detail above), the subject is visceral and haunting yet vulnerably human. A distinct narrative is intentionally concealed and left for the viewer’s interpretation, much like the artist’s process: it is hidden amongst the layers.

Through a constant working and reworking, the paint is scraped down and built up to range from a thick paste to liquid. The sheer physicality of the canvases showing layers of paint 3-4 inches in depth reveals they are as much of an object sculpturally as they are a 2-dimensional image. Subject and object become one, and the finished works represent a direct result of these layers, weaving in and out of one another, often obfuscating the literal.

Merritt’s influences include the likes of Chaim Soutine, Joan Eardley, Antonio Mancini, and Frank Auerbach; Inspired by their bravado to compose large-scale works and to experimentation with surface quality.

Alex Merritt was born in 1981 in Washington, DC. In 2015, he received his B.F.A. in painting from the Mary- land Institute College of Art and in 2018 completed his MFA from The New York Academy of Art. The artist joined Booth Gallery in June 2018; this will be his first Solo show to date. Works from are in numerous private collections worldwide and currently has had a collection of works acquired by liana Gore Museum in Tel Aviv, Israel.

On Friday, May 17, 2019, an opening reception will be held from 6-9pm and is open to the public.

PxP Contemporary Gallery Launch | 'Pilot' Exhibition
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Create! Magazine and PxP Contemporary are pleased to announce the launch of our online gallery and first-ever exhibition, Pilot. Like the premiere episode of an exciting new television series, we are thrilled to be bringing you a first look at our platform, our artists, and our curatorial style. The story behind the gallery is simple: we want to create a place where buying affordable works by talented artists from around the world is a seamless digital experience.

This first show will bring together highlights from our new roster of represented artists as well as several additional artists that we've invited specifically for this exhibition:

Anna Shukeylo
Brooke Sauer
Eliana Marinari
Huy Lam
Jennifer Small
Jenny Brown
Kestin Cornwall*
Kristen Elizabeth
Marc Scheff
Michelle Lee Rigell
Molly Mansfield
Phyllis Gorsen
Samantha Boni*
Samantha Morris
Seth Remsnyder
Shamona Stokes
Veneta Karamfilova

Any questions regarding Pilot or the gallery in general can be addressed by contacting Co-directors Alicia Puig and Ekaterina Popova at 
info@pxpcontemporary.com.

*Please note that italicized works are shipping from outside of the Unite States and require special shipping arrangements. If you are interested in purchasing works by these artists, please email us directly at info@pxpcontemporary.com. Payment plans are available upon request.

Pilot Exhibition Preview

For full artwork details including size, medium and year, please visit: www.pxpcontemporary.com

Erin Fitzpatrick
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I am constantly inspired by patterns and prints, my travels, summertime, Instagram, interior spaces, my immediate surroundings, fashion magazines, textile design and meeting new people. I have an iPhone full of screenshots, and sketchbooks, notebooks and a studio wall covered in notes and clippings — my collections of visual stimulants. A seed from these images, a West African textile, a languid Miu Miu model, a Slim Aarons photo of poolside decadence, inspires the vibe for each painting. I plan each piece around this initial idea by creating a storyboard depicting wardrobe, model type/look, textiles, and setting. I source my models from my peers and social media, import textiles, shop for wardrobe, and build a set. I style my models and chat with them as I take hundreds of reference photos. The model becomes the focal point in my world of clashing patterns, textiles, and plants.

I’m a Baltimore native and graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art.  I started painting portraits in 2008 and this body of work now contains hundreds of paintings and drawings of artists, musicians, business people, my peers, and commissioned subjects. I have collectors all across the US and around the world.

www.erinfitzpatrickportraits.tumblr.com

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Daina Higgins
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Daina Higgins was born and raised in the Clintonville neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio.  Her early art experiences were at the Columbus College of Art and Design, where she attended Saturday morning classes for seven consecutive years.  During this time she attended Fort Hayes, an arts alternative high school located in downtown Columbus.  In 1997 she received the Silas H. Rhodes Merit Scholarship from the School of Visual Arts in New York.  She moved to New York, and graduated in 2001 with her BFA.
 
Out of a small studio in her Brooklyn apartment, she began making small paintings using a spray paint and stencil technique she dreamt up while looking at Georges Seurat’s drawings.  In 2003, the Rebecca Ibel Gallery exhibited these paintings.  In 2005, Higgins also joined the Elizabeth Harris Gallery, receiving critical acclaim for her 2006 solo exhibition in the New York Times.
 
In 2007, Higgins enrolled as an MFA student at Queens College CUNY.  During the two years of graduate school, she was included in the Queens International 4, a biennial exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art in Flushing, and in 2009 she won the prestigious Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Grant.  Higgins also traveled to California to open a two-person show with Liat Yossifor at the University of LaVerne’s Harris Art Gallery.
 
Numerous publications have documented her paintings, including ArtNews, The New York Sun, The Village Voice, The Columbus Dispatch, and The New York Times.  In 2006 Roberta Smith reviewed my exhibition at Elizabeth Harris Gallery, ending her review with “[she]…creates a poetic awareness of the passage of light, moving through the world, bouncing off things and making visual experience fleetingly possible.”
 
In 2010 Higgins moved to Philadelphia, where she bought a house and studio that she has been renovating.  In November of 2017, she installed "Main Street", a series of three-dimensional paintings, inside storefront gallery Studio Hada in the Mantua neighborhood of Philadelphia. In 2017, Higgins also installed four paintings on permanent view in the Pennsylvania Convention Center (outside of Hall E).


Statement

I developed a traditional studio painting practice out of an adolescence spent as a street and graffiti artist. Because I often worked at night and photographed mine and others’ graffiti, urban night paintings based on photography are central to my work. I am interested in the fleeting nature of mood, tone, and luminosity of the urban environment and how those qualities can be encapsulated in an artifact. I also prefer to work with my hands. Therefore photography is a process that leads to my finished object, which is a painting. I rely on the marketability of paintings to be able to continue my life as an artist.

As a contemporary urban landscape painter my subject has centered around the non-place of the post-modern built environment that is comprised of vast roadside, auto-based businesses, storefronts, parking lots, highway overpasses, and other sites designed to ferry people through space to some far-flung destination. The non-place has been counter-balanced by my concurrent interest in the hyper-local, usually represented as cultural expressions of immigrant business districts in dense east coast American cities. This dichotomy is strongly represented in the inner-ring suburbs where I could afford to live as a New Yorker, and between 2006-2010 I created a body of paintings that depicted colorful storefronts alongside highway underpasses and wide roads planned by Robert Moses. A sense of ‘historicity’ was markedly absent from these paintings and so when I moved to Philadelphia in 2011 I was confronted by history in a poignant way.

I bought an old house on a busy road and watched as the recent development boom consumed multiple historic structures within the community. Curious about my own house, I researched the city archives and learned about its builder, Charles Oscar Struse, and his place in the history of the community. This historical knowledge allowed me to see my street in a new way. As an artist that is now rooted here, I seek to convey what is particular about this place, and I wish to portray the particular weirdness that Philadelphia is known for. I have decided my subject will be my own street, Ridge Avenue, a road that began as a Lenni Lenape footpath. Ridge Avenue has been through many eras of development and yet it never had a Robert Moses, so the layers of time are visible in a smaller format. The largest development era was that of the automobile, and its presence is exacerbated by the geography of the area: a dense suburb atop a steep ridge. Northwest Philadelphia was built in row houses like the rest of the city, and when the automobile came, it changed in remarkable ways. The layers include a drive-thru window on the side of a 200-year-old stone house, a pizzeria crammed inside of a mansard-roofed twin, a chrome diner situated within a cemetery, a bodega next door to a hulking stone church.

I worked with community leaders and in 2018 we were able to halt the development and historically register many of the structures, thereby preserving the layers and details of time past. I plan to continue finding the layers of history and painting what is particular about this place.

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Ciele Beau
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Ciele Beau is a visual artist based out of Vancouver, Canada. She studied at the University of Victoria (Victoria, Canada), graduating in 2013 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts and a Visual Arts major. Aside from painting, Ciele also works as an illustrator and graphic designer. She received her 2D Design Certificate from Emily Carr University of Art and Design in 2017.

It was during her time at the University of Victoria that Ciele became aware that she had a condition called Synesthesia and began exploring this within her art practice. She began creating methods of translating her experience through painting to give the audience a window into what individuals with Synesthesia might experience.

Statement

“What is Synesthesia? In simple terms, it is the crossing of one sensory pathway in the brain to another, creating abnormal sensory experiences in the body. There are multiple forms of Synesthesia, and therefore varying measures of experience. To keep things focused, within my art, I am only referencing ‘sound to colour’ Synesthesia, as I experience it. When I hear music, I experience colour. In one way it is the feeling of colour throughout my body; I liken it to the way we feel emotion and know in our bodies when we are sad or happy on a physical level. I hear a sound and feel in my body that it is orange, or blue etc. At the same time as feeling colour I also “see” shapes in my minds eye when hearing sound. Because these two experiences can be expressed as isolated events, but also simultaneous, I created two methods of painting that help me to convey the spectrum of my experience: Chromatic Forms and Colour Frequencies.

My ‘Chromatic Forms’ paintings represent moments of a piece of music and the colours and shapes as I see them, simultaneously, whereas the ‘Colour Frequency’ paintings are my way of interpreting a full score of music, from beginning to end, into colour.

As I continue to explore my condition further, I hope to broaden the confines of perceived “normal” experience. Perception is broad, and we all have our own unique lenses. While I am focused on Synesthesia, I see it as a means to an end, a small piece of the overall puzzle of how we can open our hearts and minds to each other - to understand that not everything is as we think it is, and our experience is not necessarily the same as someone else. You and I can listen to the same song and have vastly different experiences, but how beautiful would it be to open up the conversation to those variances in perception, not only in regards to something as simple as music, but to life experience and cultural differences.”

Most recently, Ciele explored the concept of celebrity and unexpected deaths with her solo show ‘An Early Funeral’. She created 14 original works for the show, in her two styles, where people could listen to a curated playlist of songs while looking at the corresponding paintings, and read about each musician who had passed away, the circumstance and their legacies.

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