Posts tagged Print
Erin Fitzpatrick
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I am constantly inspired by patterns and prints, my travels, summertime, Instagram, interior spaces, my immediate surroundings, fashion magazines, textile design and meeting new people. I have an iPhone full of screenshots, and sketchbooks, notebooks and a studio wall covered in notes and clippings — my collections of visual stimulants. A seed from these images, a West African textile, a languid Miu Miu model, a Slim Aarons photo of poolside decadence, inspires the vibe for each painting. I plan each piece around this initial idea by creating a storyboard depicting wardrobe, model type/look, textiles, and setting. I source my models from my peers and social media, import textiles, shop for wardrobe, and build a set. I style my models and chat with them as I take hundreds of reference photos. The model becomes the focal point in my world of clashing patterns, textiles, and plants.

I’m a Baltimore native and graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art.  I started painting portraits in 2008 and this body of work now contains hundreds of paintings and drawings of artists, musicians, business people, my peers, and commissioned subjects. I have collectors all across the US and around the world.

www.erinfitzpatrickportraits.tumblr.com

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Create! Magazine Issue 12 Finalists Announced

Issue 12 finalists announced!

Huge congratulations to the artists selected for our two-year anniversary issue! It was no easy talk to pick only 35 artists as we received tons of amazing submissions. Thank you so much to all those who participated.

Our guest curator for this issue is Kaly Scheller-Barrett. She is a visual artist and poet hailing originally from Bavaria. Drawing heavily from her extensive training in craft technique, Kaly’s work attempts to blur the boundaries between fine art and craft practices, asking the viewer to un- and re-frame their preconceptions of material. Kaly recently completed an MFA in Sculpture at California College of the Arts where she taught Craft Theory and is currently the Associate Director of Hashimoto Contemporary.

Stay tuned for pre-orders or subscribe at www.createmagazine.store to receive this issue.

The following artists will be published in the December 2018 edition:

Stacey Beach

Isabel Chun

Ben Dallas

Scout Dunbar

Lesley Gold

Raul Gonzalez (featured image)

Erica Green

Elizabeth Jung

Thomas Kelley III

Lydia Kinney

Huanying Koh

Forrest Lawson

Megan Magill

Amy Meissner

Aly Morgan

Hedda Neelsen

Yuria Okamura

Madison Parker

Anastasia Parmson

Diane Pribojan

Sara Allen Prigodich

Meganne Rosen

Molly Scannell

Lindsey Schulz

Max Seckel

Val Shamma

Anne Cecile Surga

Andrea Taylor

Anna Teiche

Sophie Treppendahl

Charlotte Urreiztieta 

Jimmy Viera

Ellie Ji Yang

Madeline Zappala

Angie Zielinski

Introducing Issue XI

Fall 2018 Edition

 

On The Cover 

Arlin Graff

Interviews

Florian Eymann
Arlin Graff
Morgan Hamilton
Alyson Khan
Johan Moorman
Nomeski
Hiba Schabaz
Liezel Strauss, Art Girl Rising
Vassilis Triantis

Highlight Artists by Guest Curator Conrad Benner


Amberella
Aubrie Costello
Sean 9 Lugo
Michelle Angela Ortiz
Karina Puente
Shawn Theodore

Artists Selected by Guest Curator Conrad Benner


Nessi Alexander-Barnes
Valentine Aprile
Terry Baker
A. Laura Brody
Jasmin Cañas
Sheila Cuellar-Shaffer
Jessica Curtaz
Santiago Galeas
Jodi Gerbi
Ken Goshen
Mia Halton
Ping Hatta
Benjamin Howard
M.K. Komins
Lucy Lucy
Holly MacKinnon
ADriane Nieves
Dana Oldfather
Nick Pedersen
Sofie Pihl
Horacio Quiroz
Butter E. Salmon
Amy Scheidegger
O'Neil Scott
Ewelina Skowronska
Laura Storck
Stef Sutton
Lisa Von Hoffner
We Were Wild (Risa Friedman and Meredith Feniak) 
Arielle Wilkins
Ali M Williams
Lauren Zaknoun
Daria Zhest
Kaitlin Ziesmer 

 
 
Highlights in Indie Publishing: Pikchur Magazine

Shelby McFadden is a graphic designer, illustrator, and entrepreneur who resides in a small town located between Baltimore, Annapolis, and Washington D.C. She graduated from Kutztown University of Pennsylvania in 2011 with a BFA in Communication Design with a concentration in Graphic Design and Advertising Design. She has a passion for art and design, and she feels imagination and creativity are what feeds the soul. With her mom’s influence, she grew up loving all things weird, nerdy and... “old.” Movies like Star Wars, Fright Night and Labyrinth are her top favorite movies to watch on repeat. You can often find her listening to David Bowie, The Rolling Stones, or 80’s artists like The Cure and Echo & the Bunnymen. Her favorite time of year is fall and Halloween season, and she is a big collector in Halloween antiques. For fun, she browses antique shops and yard sales, reads tarot cards to her friends, and plays Super Nintendo. She finds her interests influence her work and her love for everything weird, wild, and wonderful.

www.pikchurmag.com 

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You have a background in art and design. What inspired you to start Pikchur Magazine?

I have worked professionally as a graphic designer for nearly a decade. I am very fortunate to work in a field that allows me to be creative and help others to become successful in their personal and professional endeavors. However, the difference, in my opinion, between being a graphic designer and being an artist, is that graphic design can sometimes limit your creative freedom. It can strip away at your creative spirit, and the end result isn’t always a reflection of you, because you’re designing for the client and not for yourself. I grew up as an artist. Everything I created in my sketchbooks was 100% controlled by my thoughts, feelings and emotions. Since graduating from college nearly a decade ago, I have been so engrossed in work and design, I realized I forgot what it was like to draw and illustrate for myself. What I love most about drawing is sitting with a blank piece of paper and a pencil and no one can tell me to set limits or boundaries. I can create anything I want from the abyss of my imagination. I forgot about my “weird side,” as I like to call it. The side that was me. The side that David Bowie taught me it was okay to be different. The side that said you can be a weirdo and dress-up with zombie makeup and go to Walmart with your friends for something to do. The side of me that missed escaping the real world and diving into my sketchbook to explore the many realms of my imagination. I missed being an artist. With over five years of editorial experience, I knew I wanted to create a publication that will inspire others and bring people together. I wanted to share my personal love for the strange and bizarre, and embrace the side of me that fell dormant for some time. I want PIKCHUR Magazine to be a place where people from around the world can embrace their “weird side” and aren’t afraid to be themselves. I want to create an art community where up-and-coming artists and professional artists can discover and inspire one another. One of my favorite things to hear are artists reaching out and telling us thank you for what you are doing, because we could introduce them to other artists and get inspired. I love that. PIKCHUR Magazine is a publication that sets zero limitations to creativity and imagination. Be as weird, wild, or wonderful as you want your art to be. Without anyone saying, no.

Share your creative journey with us briefly.

My creative journey started when I was really little. I have pictures of myself under the age of four years old painting and coloring at my family’s kitchen table. I was always that person who created comics about me and my friends in spiral bound notebooks. I am pretty sure my school notes were more illustrations and less note taking. I was voted “most artistic” in school, always going above and beyond on school projects, and getting excited about art class instead of physics or mathematics. I was fortunate enough to receive art scholarships for school and my projects were nominated for design awards. I went to a fantastic University and was taught design by talented design professors. After I graduated, I worked for several large and small companies, working on an array of projects, from branding large shopping malls and mixed-media establishments all around the world, to creating patterns for tech accessories sold in large-scale retail stores in the United States. I somehow evolved from the little girl sitting in a high-chair painting on paper, to a professional graphic designer who now owns her own design company. I consider my creative journey a rough road. My self-esteem was on a teeter-totter for many years, full of highs and lows. I never knew how my days working as a designer would go when I stepped through the office doors at 8:30AM. I met challenges through work and the people I worked with. I listened to criticism and I stood behind my opinions. I listened to sexist remarks by men who fueled their egos and I comforted peers who were bullied by female art directors on power trips. However, I wouldn’t change the rough road for a smooth-paved highway. It gave me the drive to quit working for someone else, and start working for myself. In the early months of 2016, I began freelancing, which later turned into my design company. I’ve built relationships with new clients I love and learned a lot along the way.

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Why do you think print media is relevant and important in today’s digital world? What draws you to it personally?

Print media, what I believe, will always be around. I think people were nervous it would die-off now everyone owns a smartphone or tablet of some kind, but I believe there are people out there, who still prefer turning pages than scrolling up with their finger. Print and digital are two different experiences. Print is more personal. It’s like talking to someone in person over a cup of coffee versus talking to them over facetime. It’s the energy of being face to face with someone that makes the conversation experience different. One of my favorite past times is going to the local Barnes & Noble, grabbing a stack of magazines, and sitting in the cafe with a cup of coffee. Though, the cost of print is far more expensive than downloading an entire publication instantaneously, I will always be the person who collects print materials, whether it be magazines, stickers, journals, or posters. I love holding something in my hands and feeling the textures of the materials, and even stumbling upon it on a coffee table or on my computer desk and feeling the excitement all over again.

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 What should readers expect from upcoming issues of the magazine? 

I think this issue will come as a shock to a lot of readers, as it is our first issue of PIKCHUR Magazine... and it looks so damn good! Our team has been working really hard, and I am SO excited about it! I really wanted each issue to tell it’s own story and I think we really nailed it. Not only a chance for us to showcase really awesome work from other artists, but for us to really have fun with the layouts and the flow of each page, while also maintaining consistency.

Name a few of your favorite print publications.

Aside from Create! Magazine being at the top, I am also a big fan of popular magazines such as: Juxtapose, Hi-Fructose and Bon Appetit! Some of my favorite indie magazines include: Lunch Lady, Frankie, and Popshot Quarterly. I also recently discovered So Young Magazine, an awesomely illustrated, new music magazine!

Highlights in Indie Publishing: DOG Magazine

As an independent magazine, we are always curious to learn how other publishers operate. Join us as we select a few of our favorite creative titles and pick their brains about their projects. We hope that these features inspire you to create your own zine, book or blog! 

DOG is a modern lifestyle magazine exploring the presence and influence of dogs and their owners in society. Each issue centers on a common topic and explores the meaningful interactions and love of individuals and their dogs through photographic portfolios, interviews, personal essays, informative material on breeds and creative content.

Personal, visual, poetic, current and innovative, DOG offers original content and a new perspective to dog lovers and owners. Content for DOG will come from a variety of creative sources mirroring the diversity of dog owners and lovers. Submissions from emerging or established photographers, designers, illustrators, writers, designers, makers and visual artists, and any dog owner, give DOG a fresh vision of what dog mean to humans. 

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What initially inspired your publication?

My passion for independent magazines was how things started, I wanted to be involved in any way and someone suggested start our own magazine. Then the next question was, a magazine about what? I looked around and saw my dogs and questioned, what about a dog magazine? And that is how everything started.

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As an indie magazine, we are always excited to learn about what goes into the production of each issue. How do you gather content and decide on what dogs to feature?

We look at two elements when it come which breed to feature next, first its origin, it is interesting place to visit?  Will people would like to read about it? And second does the dog has an interesting story line?  When those two elements come together, we got our cover girl/boy.

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Tell us about your team. How many people typically contribute to each edition? 

Officially we have three in our pack. 
We are a very small team , we have our Editor Emily Rogers, our Editorial Assistant Hannah FitzSimons and me, who puts the magazine together. Then we have collaborators from around the word like  writers, illustrators and Photographers.
 
What do you hope the readers take away from DOG?

We want our readers to have fun with our magazine, to read what we write and to learn a bit more about dogs, specially about the specifics of each breed. Sometimes people get dogs just because they look cute without knowing the dog’s temperament or other characteristics that might not be suitable for your lifestyle.

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What is your favorite part about publishing a magazine? 

My favorite part about publishing a magazine is that I get to work with so many creative people, people around the world who somehow have inspired us with their work. 
 
What advice would you give someone who wants to get into indie publishing? 

My advice will be to be different, have a strong concept, do your research , look for similar magazines are out there and see what they are doing, and then do it even better. Create content that has a meaning and a reason behind it. 

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What are you looking forward to the most in 2018?

When we get our two issues printed. That is our highlight of the year, to see it in front of us.

Malika Favre

Malika Favre is a French artist based in London.

Her bold, minimal style – often described as Pop Art meets OpArt – is a striking lesson in the use of positive/negative space and colour.

Her unmistakable style has established her as one of the UK’s most sought after graphic artists. Malika’s clients include The New Yorker, Vogue, BAFTA, Sephora and Penguin Books, amongst many others.

Follow @malikafavre on twitter and instagram.

Create! Magazine in Amsterdam

Our writer Alicia Puig went on an adventure to our new shop Athenaeum Booksellers, in Amasterdam! Check out our latest edition and visit the shop to get your own copy of our independent art magazine. 

“Athenaeum Booksellers is one of Holland’s and Amsterdam’s largest independent bookstores. Not only do we have a large stock in the literary field, but also in various academic fields, such as (classical and modern) languages, the humanities and the social sciences. About 40% of our stock is self-imported. The Athenaeum Nieuwscentrum offers a wide range of foreign and local newspapers and magazines, plus a curated selection of travel guides and books on design, fashion and lifestyle.”
— Athenaeum Booksellers
Issue VI Preview!

We couldn't wait to share the beautiful pages of issue VI with you! Enjoy a broad selection of artists from all over the world, hand picked by our editors and guest curator Brock Brake. If you want to add some color to your coffee table, order your own copy here.

Interviews:

Jeremy Miranda, Laurence Philomene, Maciek Jasik, Threadwinners, Young Arts Initative, Heather Day and Troy Counterman

Additional Features:

Kit King, Holly Zandbergen, Muzae Sesay, Meryl Pataky, Kelly Ording, Troy Lovegates, Jean Nagai, Brett Flanigan

Artists selected by Brock Brake of Athen B Gallery :

Peter Adamyan
Dan Bortz
Christopher Burk
Heather Day
Anna Di Mezza
Verdjinia Stefani Doycheva
Eric Dyer
Isis Hockenos
Sara Hupas
Tiffany Jan
Kelly Johnston
Laurence Jones
Mya Kerner
Kate Klingbeil
Joshua Dean Lammers
Magdalena Lamri
Giulia Livi
Booshra Mastour
Nicole Mueller
Senem Oezdogan
Miriam Omura
Yoonshin Park
Lorella Paleni
Julio Rodriguez
Katy Schmader
Suzanna Scott
S. Tudyk
Anastasia Tumanova
Nathan Tuttle
Morgan Ward
Lara Williams
Cindy Zell
Tong Zhang
Xi Zhang

 

Marcelina Amelia

Marcelina Amelia is a mixed media artist, focusing on print, painting and drawing. Originally from Poland, she draws inspiration from Polish religious iconography, folk tales, childhood memories, dreams, sexuality and human relationships. Her works are an uneasy mixture of lustful darkness and adolescent innocence.Inspired by pot plants, trapped wildernesses in miniature, the overcrowded streets of London and never ending online content, this body of work examines the relationship between humans, individuals and their environment. Marcelina utilises nature as a metaphor for everyday feelings and headaches. Marcelina received her degree in Illustration and Visual Communication from University of Westminster, in London. She has been featured in publications including Booooooom, Digital Arts, Art Wednesday, Vogue and Ballad Of Magazine. She exhibited at D&AD, New Designers, London Design Festival, London Illustration Fair and took part in Faberge’s Big Egg Hunt. 

Indie Magazines We Are Crushing On

It's no secret that we love magazines. In today's fast paced, digital world there is still plenty of room for gorgeous print publications to grace our coffee tables. We love to discover new contemporary artists, learn about other cultures or simply see what other creatives are up to. Many of these publications are independent magazines with amazing, inspiring founders. Check out these beauties and don't forget to subscribe to keep print alive and well.

 Uppercase Magazine 

 Uppercase Magazine 

1. UPPERCASE

UPPERCASE is a small, independent publisher of books and magazines for the creative and curious: products that spark the imagination and inspire creativity. Founded in 2009 by Janine Vangool, UPPERCASE is loved by readers around the world and has been recognized for its design excellence. 

Flow Magazine 

Flow Magazine 

2. Flow

"The best things happen when you dare to follow your heart. And that’s exactly what we did when we hatched this idea for a new Dutch magazine in an attic room several years ago. We dreamed of a magazine with which we could explore our love of paper. A magazine of unhurried time, all about doing things differently and making new choices. Small happiness, daily life and the beauty of not always managing to be perfect. That is how Flow began. Flow is all about positive psychology, mindfulness, creativity and the beauty of imperfection. We love illustrations and in each issue there is a gift made of our much-loved paper. We print the magazine itself on different types of paper." Explore Flow

Elephant Magazine 

Elephant Magazine 

3. Elephant 

Elephant Magazine is a quarterly on contemporary art and visual culture that features fresh faces and original voices, uncovering new trends and talent.

Makers Movement 

Makers Movement 

4. Makers Movement

Maker's Magazine is a bi-annual print publication that celebrates creativity, craft & storytelling. Each issue unpacks a different theme, inspiring our contributors to wander the depth of their creative practice. Maker's Movement has become a platform not only for showcasing an amazing collection of visual work, but for building meaningful dialogue around the human experience.

It's Nice That

It's Nice That

5. Printed Pages by It's Nice That

It’s Nice That believes passionately that creative inspiration is for everyone and by championing the most exciting and engaging work online, in print and through our events programme, we want to open up this world to the widest possible audience.

Founded in 2007, It’s Nice That has grown across many platforms and reaches over a million people each month. These include the website which is updated daily, a bi-annual magazine Printed Pages, a summer symposium Here and the monthly Nicer Tuesdays talks series.

 

From Internet to Paper: Printing With Vincent Hulme

Via Art Connect

A snow man is breathing glitch fire next to a naked couple having an intimate moment in bed; there are flowers everywhere. Pink letters are forming the words “I loved you for too long” above them. Artist Vincent Hulme’s Tumblr feed is as ironic as it is aesthetically pleasing; it’s also his biggest source of inspiration. His contemporary style can easily be recognised in the feed. He’s a lithographer, serigrapher, writer and performer or as he explains on his website: He’s doing his best to spread the word of Vince.

Vincent lets us into his apartment with a shy smile; it’s a Monday morning and we’re all tired. The colours of his prints, hanging in his room, immediately energises us though. They are perfectly printed in purple and green. When making a print the first step for Vincent is always to create a prototype by playing around with different images, colours or shapes in Photoshop. The printing can finally begin after he’d gotten it back as an offset plate from the plate maker. “I always go back to printing. That’s the one thing I do recurrently”, he explains.

Before moving to Berlin six years ago Vincent was studying Fine Arts at Concordia in Montreal, specialising in screen printing. Now he spends his days working as an art teacher, scrolling Tumblr for inspiration and practicing his own art. Which means, spending a lot of time by the offset printing press in his studio.