Posts tagged Sculpture
Inner Worlds: Interview with Tanner Mothershead
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Tanner Mothershead is a midwestern born artist. He attended undergraduate school at the Northwest Missouri State University before going on to attain his MFA at the University of Iowa with an emphasis in ceramics and minors in painting and sculpture. He has exhibited work at NCECA and published in New American Paintings

A driving force in the creation of his work is a desire to make sense of both people and place. The work stems from a fascination with the human mind's ability to interpret, transform, and create the world around it. Much of the work formed acts as an apparatus for viewing and experiencing a conceptualized inner world in relationship to tangible reality.  His research delves into the functions and meanings of symbolism, spatial relations, and degrees of abstraction. Elements of Jungian psychology, philosophy, and architecture are woven together in these biomorphic surreal narratives.  

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Briefly tell us about your current work.

My current work focuses on the relationship between physical and perceived reality, with an emphasis on the inner worlds people create either for idle pleasure or to escape traumatic experiences. Everyday in the news we hear about mass shootings and are bombarded with senseless acts of violence. I think about events that have happened to the people closest to me as well as a deeply traumatic event in my own life, the dots and lines of happenings and how they connect. The work I make becomes objects of connection. They appear outwardly as fun fantasy worlds with bright color, enticing one to look deeper. Neon doors, steps, and pathways act in contrast to darker, more sinister, elements buried further in.

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At first glance your work looks very material based. Can you give us some insight about your use of materials?

I suspend layers of paint and other materials in transparent resin in order to form sculptural paintings. This drive stems from my compulsive desire to give physical form and depth to these imagined spaces; I wish to make more concrete the fact that the mental landscape is just as real as the one we all share. They take the shape of geoded doorways or shards, reminiscent of transitional spaces, as well as how our perceptions of reality build up over time and pressure. Most recently I have begun making them in the form of the midbrain and visual cortexes, the parts of human anatomy linking the eye to the brain. They remain as fragmentary images of places alien to outsiders and have a shallow, ghostly, topographical map stamped on its surface.

Spiritually, I work to embody elements from two notable psychotherapists, who also dabbled in creative practice: Carl Jung, who was a leading pioneer in the understanding of the inner human, and Herman Rorschach, who utilized a delicate balance of pure abstraction to that of recognizable objectivity.

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Who in the art community inspires you?

Currently the artists I have found inspiring, and thoroughly enjoyed following their practice, have been Lauren Clay, Michael Reeder, Alex Eckman-Lawn, and Donté K. Hayes.

Three Dimensional Sculpture by Ling-lin Ku
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Ling-lin receive her MFA from University of Texas at Austin in 2019 and BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2016. In addition to being an artist Ling-lin has a background in music and law. She has a degree in Law at Taiwan. Ling-lin has been exhibited her work in cities ranging from New York, to Austin and LA, and selected into residencies including International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP) in Brooklyn and Haystack Open Studio, Maine. In 2019 Ling-lin is one of the four recipients of Seebacher Prize for Fine Arts awarded by the American Austrian Foundation. 

Statement

Double life, double play. My work is animistic and uncanny in the same time. I grew up in a culture that celebrates animism; influenced by the Dao belief that every object has a kind of unseen life and energy. Yet In the process of coming into life, uncanny things happen. While combining an enlarged egg-shaped dome with rigid, black raven legs, a narrative of death and birth appears. The tensions and nuance between strange and familiar create an eeriness.

By playing with the expectations of context and collaging parts into hybrids, I create objects that beyond our conventional understandings of the physical world, where seemingly familiar things can have alternate identities. Employing digital scanning and modeling is a way to jump into my own three-dimensional rabbit hole where I can precisely distort recognizable forms to re-assign their identities through hybridizing, recomposing, altering materials and hyperbolic scale shifts.

www.linglinku.com

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Interview with Moniker Art Fair highlight artist Sergio Garcia
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We were so excited to learn more about Sergio Garcia, a highlight artist for the upcoming Moniker Art Fair in London! Sergio is a Cuban-American artist, a sculptor and a painter who uses art as a means for exploring his personal identity, both past and present, within the context of the ever-present human condition and the socio-political environment. Read his interview below to know how he got started in art, what he will be presenting at the fair, and the other big projects he has coming up this year!

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Tell us about your background and how you became interested in art?

My father’s side of the family is from Mexico and my mother’s side is from Texas. I grew up in Dallas, Texas. Growing up I read a lot of Bloom County comic strips and listened to a lot of Iron Maiden and ZZ Top. I started drawing a lot of album covers on book covers at school. Eventually, I slowly started getting into graffiti and skateboarding. The skateboarding culture really influenced me and my work today. As I got older I learned to airbrush and started airbrushing cars and motorcycles. Then that slowly led me into doing contemporary art. I still paint motorcycles every now and then.

You use words like unconventional and unorthodox when discussing your work. Can you describe in what ways your work can be seen as pushing past traditional boundaries and what effect you hope to achieve by doing this?

I guess the main reason would be the types of materials I use. Most of my work is done in automotive paint. I also use a wide range of material like; blown glass, plastic, resin, fiberglass. All with automotive clear float finishes. I guess another thing would be that I don’t have one set way of making my sculptures. I experiment with all types of products to achieve the best look possible.

Tell us about your most interesting project or favorite piece that you've made?

Believe it or not it’s the ones for the moniker art fair. Probably the OJ II WHEEL. Seeing that one come to life brings back a lot of memories and excitement. I think a lot of my work ties to youthfulness and this one hits home the hardest.

How does your process work? Do you do a lot of research and sketching or create art more intuitively? How long does one piece take and do you work on series separately or simultaneously?

I do a lot of research beforehand. I think about every option and I even try samples of materials that I think would work best. I try to have everything thought out before I attempt it. Some series I think about for years before attempting. Sometimes I’ll make a piece and then assembly line the rest. Other times I go all in and change things as I go.

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What can we look forward to from you at Moniker Art Fair?

I’m doing a new series that I’ve kept under wraps of oversized hyper-realistic skateboard wheels. I’m really excited about this series. I’ve been wanting to make them for a while. Moniker offered me a spotlight series which gave me the freedom to pull it off. The group of work is called “It’s the little things”. Skateboarding culture is kind of what got me into doing art in the first place. A lot of the styles, graphics, colors, and thing from the 80s and 90s struck a chord with me. It still does to this day. So it’s nice to pay homage to that. I hope the viewers are just as excited as I am.

Are there any other exciting projects, collaborations or exhibitions for the rest of the year that you'd like to share?

We have Miami in December, which is Art Basel. I’ll be showing with Thinkspace. That’s always my favorite time of the year. Other than that, I have a few mural projects in the works.

By Alicia Puig

Small Sculptures by Kelly Sheppard Murray
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Kelly Sheppard Murray is a Raleigh, North Carolina artist, educator, and designer with BFA, and MFA degrees from UNCG and ECU respectively. Murray’s career as an artist has emphasized three-dimensional design and fabrication for nature, health, science, and history museums, although her personal practice includes a wide array of media and processes. 

 

While maintaining a professional practice in design and fine arts, Murray teaches 2D & 3D design, painting, sculpture, and art appreciation at Wake Technical Community College. In 2014, Murray was awarded faculty rank as Associate Professor at Wake Technical Community College 

 

Murray is a 2018 recipient of the International Encaustic Artists Emerging Artist Grant. Other recognitions include being selected as a 2016 the Artspace Regional Emerging Artist in Residence, as well as a 2000 and 2012 recipient of Regional Artist Project Grant by the United Arts of Raleigh and Wake County. She now maintains a tenant studio at Artspace in order to be able to continue sharing work and having a conversation with the public. 

 

Recent exhibitions include a solo exhibition Kelly Sheppard Murray: Sculptures at Wilma Daniels Gallery, Wilmington, NC; Knoxville Tennessee’s Dogwood Arts 2018 Regional Arts Exhibition, Raleigh Fine Arts Society’s 2018 North Carolina Artists Exhibition, Artspace’s 30th Anniversary Retrospective Juried Exhibition.

 

 

Statement

 

Guided by the idea that consistent small actions create significant impact, I create small sculptures to allow my own daily actions to grow the body of work over time. This process of creating over a year or months is meant to also tie to the notion that our small actions affect the world beyond us. I encase, cover, stitch or layer found, industrial, cast-off or surplus materials to create objects or images that are not easily identified as natural or man-made. The pieces are made in a somewhat without plan or design but instead rely on a tactile knowledge and personal vocabulary built over a lifetime. I don’t plan these pieces but respond intuitively to materials and the forms. This process provides me the opportunity to discover something that I may not have otherwise imagined. 

In our slick, digitally saturated lives, I believe we need to be reminded of the living breathing tactile world that surrounds us.  My color choices are may be connected to nature while the forms remain ambiguous and non-specific but hold a hint of familiarity. 

I draw from the shapes of plants, moss, lichen, fungi, geological forms, and seashells. Because I am interested in how human behavior alters natural or man-made forms and spaces, I often place the irregular nature-inspired shapes in relation to grids, geometric structures, and repetitive patterns to try to consider the relationship between contrasting and sometimes conflicting forces. Combining and considering the similarities or differences in these shapes and forms allows me to deal with the intertwined relationship of human activity with nature.

Humorous and Informative Sculptures by Gary-Michael Tuzinkiewicz

Gary-Michael Tuzinkiewicz is a Pennsylvania based artist who focuses on sculpture. He received his BFA in studio art from Kutztown University of Pennsylvania in 2019. The work he makes is composed of a blend between raw natural materials and out of context consumer items. Minimal forms convey humankind’s false superiority and entitlement to nature, while more narrative works confront social constructs that separate humans from it. Through observation of the world around him, he strives to articulate his views and concerns through object-making. His personal subject matter has evolved into themes related to the environment, socio-economic issues, Americana, and reflections of our societal operations. There is an overall comment or sense on how consuming American society can be and how it affects everyone’s presence in life with an urgency to become more aware. He expresses his views and concerns through a variety of forms that he intends his audience to find informative, humorous, and engaging. Tuzinkiewicz’s work has been exhibited in and around Kutztown, Pennsylvania.

How We Started Collecting Art on a Budget and Why It Is Important to Us

By Ekaterina Popova and Alicia Puig

From Kat:

Working with hundreds of artists through Create! Magazine over the past several years has given me an incredible opportunity to discover beautiful and affordable works. I had the privilege of decorating my apartment on a budget because I was exposed to artists working in all mediums, styles, and price points. 

It first started off as trades with my own work, and later evolved to me purchasing some of my favorite pieces to add to my ever-growing collection. 

What makes owning original art special, instead of settling for a cheap canvas print from Ikea or Marshall’s is that your space will have a completely unique vibe, curated based on your visual aesthetic. It will make it so much more fun to entertain your guests because each piece has a story that you can share. I don’t know about you, but I want to cultivate an interesting life both inside and outside of my home. 

Having been both the buyer and seller of artwork, I love the process. For example, it makes me so proud to share my growth with those who invested in my work early in my career. I bet the gentleman that purchased my first large painting in 2012 is excited to see me move on to exhibit at international art fairs, work with bigger galleries, and be featured by leading blogs and publications. It’s exciting for the collector to feel as if they are a part of the artist’s journey and evolution and that they were a part of making their success happen. On the flip side, I love seeing the artists I traded with or purchased from move on to reach higher levels and increase their value in the art market. More than anything, having my community literally surround me inside my home brings me immense joy and comfort. 

If you are ready to upgrade your living space and truly make it unique, exciting, and full of the energy of the creatives that you love, take the first step and buy your favorite thing that you can afford at the moment. Most artists and galleries will work with you and can even offer a payment plan if you don’t have cash upfront for a larger piece. I have frequently let my collectors pay as low as $100 per month for larger paintings. 

A few months ago, Alicia Puig and I launched our online platform, PxP Contemporary, which will help you get started on your art collection. We wanted to create a space where new collectors can order a piece they love without awkward interactions, especially if you are new to buying art. Shop our collection of affordable works ranging from $100-$2000 to help you get started! If you aren’t quite sure which piece you want to buy first, don’t be shy about contacting an artist you’ve been following on Instagram to get more information about their work and pricing or you can look for local gallery exhibitions where you might just find something you fall in love with. With any of the works exhibited with PxP Contemporary, you can always email us with questions at info@pxpcontemporary.com. We’re happy to help!

Here are a few of my favorite pieces which are available at PxP Contemporary:

From Alicia:

Looking back to our days in college, perhaps it was always meant to be that Kat and I would be working on a gallery project together. She was technically my very first art purchase! While we were both pursuing our BFA degrees at Kutztown University, I fell in love with a beautiful landscape piece with a country home pictured against a vivid pink background that she had painted and mustered up the courage to ask her if I could buy it. At the time, we knew each other through working at an off-campus gallery, but weren’t as close as we are now so I wasn’t sure what she would say. Luckily, she agreed, gave me a price that I could fit into my student budget, and I started to realize that I could afford to collect art that I loved. I simply had to ask or else I’d never know. As I started in my career, I was able to continue to learn more about buying art from working in galleries. I learned about asking for discounts and payment plans, but also continued to buy directly from artists as well. 

For me, like with Kat, my apartment would never feel complete without art on the walls. It both looks and feels empty. Whenever I move into a new place, I get anxious until I start to curate the space because without art, it doesn’t yet have that same feeling of being my ‘home’. So this ends up being one of the very few aspects of moving that I actually enjoy, ha!

The artworks I hang around me also serve as a reminder of wonderful artists who I have worked with in the past and places I have visited, the lovely friends and family who have purchased art for me, or are just pieces that make me happy when I look at them! One of the most beautiful things about art is that it is so emotional and personal. You have the power to find art that speaks to you and surround yourself with it. It can bring consistent reminders of positive memories and spark feelings of joy. Who wouldn’t want that? 

More than the aesthetic part of collecting, however, I also enjoy that I’m supporting someone else’s career. While it is exciting to buy art from big names that you may have seen in history books or museums, it is so important to invest in the current generation of living artists. The artists who are household names now usually had patrons or other buyers back in their day and the majority definitely wouldn’t have been able to continue their work without them. This is probably the art historian in me talking, but if we don’t support those working today, how will they be able to leave their mark? Many are worried about making ends meet, not making history. So let’s make sure that we’re all doing what we can to support each other in this community. 

Not to mention, there is so much talent in a vast array of mediums both traditional and new and it is wonderful that today there is even greater recognition for women artists, artists of color, and LGBTQIA artists. We can all find our niche. Therefore, with a little bit of research you will definitely find someone’s work that is really meaningful to you. I certainly have!

These are all reasons why we created PxP Contemporary. We wanted a place that makes collecting easy: not intimidating, not complicated, not expensive, and not low quality. We’ve curated a selection of work by incredible artists from around the world and given them a platform to showcase their art and tell their stories. If you aren’t familiar with PxP yet, I invite you to take a look. I hope you’ll join us! 

In addition to our website: www.pxpcontemporary.com you can also follow along on Facebook and Instagram to stay updated with gallery news and exhibitions.

The first exhibition curated by PxP Contemporary!

The first exhibition curated by PxP Contemporary!

Lindsay Jones
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Lindsay is a contemporary artist, textile designer, and graphic designer, originally from Lee's Summit, Missouri but currently residing in Western Colorado. She works in a variety of media including drawing, painting, digital art, sculptural constructions, and installations. Lindsay’s work reflects on ideas of landscapes and environments that are built, altered, shaped, and manipulated, while using playful patterns and abstracted imagery. When she is not working, she is doing her best to spend as much time outside as possible, including camping, exploring remote lands, mountain biking in the desert, and racing cyclocross. 

Statement

“The word landscape itself becomes problematic: landscape describes the natural world as an aesthetic phenomenon, a department of visual representation. A landscape is scenery, scenery is stage decoration, and stage decorations are static backdrops for human drama.”

--Rebecca Solnit

Abstracting images from architecture and landscape, I create drawings, small sculptures, and installations out of materials such as paper, collage, and balsa wood. My work is the result of my observations of the landscape: the rural, the urban, the exquisite, the boring, the natural, the unnatural, etc. I find myself both in awe of, as well as disturbed by, the way that we build, and transform our environments and believe that humanity will always be trying to figure out how to negotiate our life in this shared environment.

This collection of drawings uses imagery from the Western Colorado and Utah deserts, whose environments I find to be valuable because of their lack of human development. I use hand-drawn elements and abstracted symbols to represent these ideas of culture, and environment that I myself am always trying to process.


www.lindsayannajones.com

Mother and Daughter, Lot Brandt and Sophie Holt, Ceramic Artists
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Interview with Sophie Holt by Alicia Puig

Mother and daughter, second and third generation ceramic artists, are collaborating for the first time.

Our genes, our treasure, our commitment results in a sculptural collection called ‘SoLo’ Lot, who lives in The Netherlands, came to visit her daughter in Motueka, New Zealand for nine months. And those nine months they have been working together, almost every day, on a collection of sculptures.

I love clay. It is a pure and honest material. People used it centuries before me. When I see work created by long lost civilizations, sometimes thousands of years old, I feel connected, and amazed…the tendency to tell your story through a hunk of clay is so ancient.

Egbert Brandt taught me to be a ceramist. From 1981 to 1985 I attended the evening academy in Utrecht; modern oil painting techniques, anatomy, and portrait drawing. The urge to transform experiences into ceramic forms, my creative energy, for me, it is innate. To listen to my passion and act upon it, to continuously evolve, are my rewards.

It is beautiful and intense that my hands make that what I take in from the world around me and in me. Because I work from a space where words do not exist, it is difficult to find the right ones to accompany my work. 

It is wonderful when someone comes by and identifies. While you do not know one another, it suddenly creates an intimate connection. I once read; you are the connections that you make. This always remained with me. And in those moments, I feel it is true. 

Sophie has watched me work on the kitchen table from the age of 2, and it is very special to have been working together as mother and daughter each our person but together one, SoLo.

www.instagram.com/studiosoph

www.lotbrandt.nl

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How did you first become interested in art, and can you explain a bit of how it led you to the work you create today?

S: I come from an artistic family. I have always been surrounded by art. My mother often took me to galleries and lucky for me, there are a lot of them in The Netherlands, where I grew up. What I love about art is that you can be free of what it means to you; the emotions you feel might not be the same as what someone else gets from the same piece.

I now live in New Zealand, the country where I was born, but I grew up in Utrecht, The Netherlands. Last year my mum came over for nine months so we could work together for the very first time. She taught me new techniques, and together we created 17 sculptures.

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We love that your illustrations and ceramics are so colorful and fun. Can you tell us about what inspires you?

S: I always find that a difficult question to answer. I think because I’m not very good with words and expressing myself verbally I like to do this visually. So everything that happens around/inside me, the good and the bad, I use as inspiration.

Can you talk about some of your favorite works, and what makes them special to you?

S: What I loved about making these big sculptures is that they take a very long time to make. That feeling when you open your kiln and everything is still in one piece- is one of the best feelings you can get. It was a new experience for me.

And what makes the sculptures even more special is that it was a collaboration with my mother, creating together in one room for those months was very special. I hope there will be a lot more of that in the future.

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Describe your current studio or creative space. What is most important about it or one thing that you definitely need in your work area?

S: At the moment I am working in the extra bedroom of my house.

What I need is good light, a good seat, and a table. And I work best listening to podcasts or have a documentary going in the background. I’ve always been like that, even in high school, I was always drawing while the teachers were talking to the class.

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What one piece of creative or business advice would you give to your younger self?

Don’t undersell yourself. And to my creative younger self- don’t freak out if you have a creative block. It will come back eventually.

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Do you have any big collaborations, projects, exhibitions, etc. going on during the rest of the year that you'd like to share?

We will exhibit all the sculptures we made at the Quiet Dog Gallery in Nelson, New Zealand. This will happen very soon- this coming July!

Clémentine Bal
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I was born in Paris in 1979. I studied at the Fine Arts Annecy and Dijon.

In my studio, I purify, mix, and transform animal shapes to recompose characters I like to surround myself with. They are for me like little benevolent divinities, sweet and sensitive. Eyes closed, they are in an interiority, as in meditation. What emerges from their attitude reflects the long process of creation. I superimpose on each other layers of inert materials that will be long and gently sanded. I pamper each small part of these bodies, and the sanding becomes caress. The matte and velvety paint comes to rest on the rounded and purified forms. I try to transmit to them all the sweetness possible.

www.clementinebal.com

Dolls Exploring the Experience of Motherhood: Interview with Nicole Havekost
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By Alicia Puig

Nicole Havekost is an artist living in Rochester, Minnesota. Her own work is varied in media and technique but linked by her interest in material and process. Recently, Nicole was both a 2018 Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant recipient and Southeastern Minnesota Arts Council Advancing Artist Grant recipient. She has recently exhibited work in New Orleans, Dallas, and Tasmania, Australia. Nicole earned her BFA in Printmaking at the Rhode Island School of Design and her MFA in Printmaking from the University of New Mexico. 

I make figures that are doll-like in form. I began making these figures when my son was small. I expected these figures would teach my son about my world, but instead, this work has been a way to teach me about his. These figures are observers, thoughtful participants in the process of discovery. They nurture and protect, yet they are neither beast nor human. These animals are my evolving experience of motherhood; the profound change of body, heart, and desire I never expected and couldn’t control in a new world rich with possibility.

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How did you first become interested in art, and can you explain a bit of how it led you to the work you create today?

I've always loved to draw. I didn't know a person could be an artist, and the only art form I was familiar with was the newspaper comics. So I wanted to be a cartoonist. That interest later turned to fashion design, but after my foundation year at RISD, I realized there were so many other possibilities. I graduated as a printmaker but began making sculptural objects during my senior year. I haven't stopped since.

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Tell us about the inspiration behind your artwork or a specific series that you're currently working on.

I currently have two different bodies of work in progress, but they both come from the same place. I am deeply interested in exploring what it feels like to be in a body. The animal dolls that are published in Create! Magazine reference my transition to motherhood and how it felt to nurture another soul in this world. The other work includes mixed media sculpture exploring my bodily experience of sickness, pregnancy, aging, and recently, perimenopause.

Can you talk about some of your favorite works, and what makes them special to you?

My favorite works are often the ones I make at the beginning of a series. I don't yet know what the work will look like, but I can tell we will be the best of friends once it is complete. Often as the work progresses, there are stronger pieces, but that first one always holds a special place. It was there before I saw it, and then I made it. I love creating doll-like forms; my "Candy Lady" series of figures with candy innards are some of my favorites.

What is your process like? Do you do a lot of sketching or make work more intuitively?

I work intuitively. Mostly I keep a list of descriptors related to the series I am working on. I am terrible at planning at planning my work; I get too tight. I like to have to problem solve my way through the process. Natural consequences make the work pretty interesting.

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Do your works often undergo a lot of changes before you consider them complete? How long does a piece take?

My work does change as I make it, but that's because I am responding to the process as I work instead of altering original plans. Because I do so much hand stitching in my work, progress is slower than I would like. But the process is deeply meditative and brings me much joy while I am doing it. I haven't paid attention to actual hours, but I can account for the time in episodic television. Some works take the length of several seasons of a Netflix binge, while other processes are a couple of stand up specials. I can't watch anything I really have to pay attention to when I am stitching, but I can keep track of large narratives. It is the best way to work.

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Are there any exciting exhibitions, projects, or collaborations going on this year that you're currently working on or will be soon?

I am excited to be shipping work to the Southbend Museum of Art Biennial 30 next month as well as the exhibition "Modern Archetypes" at Higher Art Gallery in Traverse City, Michigan. I will be participating in RISDCraft 2019 in Providence, Rhode Island in October and teaching the workshop "The Doll as Storyteller" at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, Tennessee in November.

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PxP Contemporary Gallery Launch | 'Pilot' Exhibition
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Create! Magazine and PxP Contemporary are pleased to announce the launch of our online gallery and first-ever exhibition, Pilot. Like the premiere episode of an exciting new television series, we are thrilled to be bringing you a first look at our platform, our artists, and our curatorial style. The story behind the gallery is simple: we want to create a place where buying affordable works by talented artists from around the world is a seamless digital experience.

This first show will bring together highlights from our new roster of represented artists as well as several additional artists that we've invited specifically for this exhibition:

Anna Shukeylo
Brooke Sauer
Eliana Marinari
Huy Lam
Jennifer Small
Jenny Brown
Kestin Cornwall*
Kristen Elizabeth
Marc Scheff
Michelle Lee Rigell
Molly Mansfield
Phyllis Gorsen
Samantha Boni*
Samantha Morris
Seth Remsnyder
Shamona Stokes
Veneta Karamfilova

Any questions regarding Pilot or the gallery in general can be addressed by contacting Co-directors Alicia Puig and Ekaterina Popova at 
info@pxpcontemporary.com.

*Please note that italicized works are shipping from outside of the Unite States and require special shipping arrangements. If you are interested in purchasing works by these artists, please email us directly at info@pxpcontemporary.com. Payment plans are available upon request.

Pilot Exhibition Preview

For full artwork details including size, medium and year, please visit: www.pxpcontemporary.com

Jamie Bates Slone
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Jamie Bates Slone is a sculptor living and working in Norman, Oklahoma where she is Assistant Professor of Ceramics at the University of Oklahoma. Jamie received her MFA from the University of Kansas and her BFA from the University of Central Missouri. Her work addresses the fragility of the human spirit in relation to her personal history with physical and mental illness.

Statement

Through conjured memory, I revisit my personal history with physical and mental illness. My current work is a reflection of those memories with an emphasis on the relationship between human biology and human emotion. By using the figure as metaphor, I am able to reflect the sentiments often correlated with feelings of depression, anxiety, fear, and loss.

In my studio practice, anxieties about my own physical and mental health and obsessions with mortality manifest themselves in the choice of scale, charged surfaces, and uneasy body language within the figures. My surface choices are derived from diagnostic imaging of the human body focusing on their color and visual texture. My intent is for one to imagine the surface of the skin as a reflection of what is happening inside the body and mind. These are ideas that are continuously shifting and evolving as I think about how I want these objects to be perceived

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Jessica Tenbusch
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Jessica Tenbusch is inspired by the animal and plant species that live near humans. She explores the relationships between species and how they shaped her experience as a human animal. Her work is an observation on our role as ecosystem builders and destroyers. These works are fragments of our daily environment, showing just how close nature is in our everyday lives, embedded in our homes and neighborhoods. In her childhood, she shared her home with a multitude of other animals and hundreds of houseplants. Outside was always inside.

She loves to work in the spaces between two-dimensional and three-dimensional representation and uses color pencil, ink, acrylic paint, wood, metal, and found natural and man-made materials to create sculpture and works on paper.

Jessica received her BFA in 2011 and MFA in 2014 from Eastern Michigan University where she concentrated in metalsmithing and drawing. In addition to exhibiting her work nationally, she is active in the local arts community curating shows and coordinating events. She lives and works in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Her practice is located within Ypsi Alloy Studios, a 3D arts studio she co-owns and runs with two other local artists.

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Dan Lam: Delicious Monster at Hashimoto Contemporary
Dan Lam, Lemons, 2019.jpg

NEW YORK CITY - Hashimoto Contemporary is pleased to present Delicious Monster, a solo exhibition by Dallas, Texas based artist Dan Lam. Delicious Monster will be the artists inaugural solo exhibition at Hashimoto Contemporary, in which she continues to explore the opposing themes of the beautiful and repulsive, the attractive and revulsive, and how often these two opposing sentiments can come from within the same source. Referencing these dichotemies, the works in Delicious Monster explore color and form while experimenting with new materials and layering processes.

For her latest body of work, Lam was inspired by the monstera deliciosa fruit, whose scientific name literally means ‘delicious monster.’ Resembling an ear of corn with a green exterior, this hexagon patterned fruit is sweet, delicious and tropical, yet it can cause severe throat and skin irritation if eaten before it has fully ripened. Fascinated by the fruits tempting contradictions, the works in Delicious Monster explores this relatable concept - patience is often tested by temptation, and the excitement and desire to have an experience before the appropriate moment can often result in dangerous consequences.

Exploring a variety of textures, from the shimmering iridescent to pointed spikes, Lam’s sculptures appear almost lifelike, as if they were living organisms from a psychedelic universe. Simultaneously alluring and unsettling, their textures, candy colored hues and organic shapes draw the viewer in, tempting you to touch them and enter their alternate universe.

The exhibition will be on view through Saturday, May 25th. For more information, additional images, or exclusive content, please email nyc@hashimotocontemporary.com

About Dan
Dan Lam is a sculptor based in Texas where she creates otherworldly, psychedelic sculptures. Her work has been featured in New American Painting, Juxtapoz and The Creator’s Project, as well as exhibited extensively in the United States.

Hashimoto Contemporary 210 Rivington Street
New York, NY 10002

Art New York Highlight Exhibitor: Cavalier Gallery
Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)   Black Panther , 2017  Bullet Shells 36 x 72 x 12 in. (91.4 x 182.9 x 30.5 cm)

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)
Black Panther, 2017
Bullet Shells
36 x 72 x 12 in. (91.4 x 182.9 x 30.5 cm)

Art New York 2019 at Pier 94

Thu, May 2 - Sun, May 5 

www.artnyfair.com

The highly-anticipated fifth edition of Art New York returns to Pier 94 from May 2-5 during the height of New York’s art and cultural season. 

The Fair showcases noteworthy works by important artists from the contemporary, modern, post-war and pop eras presented by more than 70 international galleries. Art New York provides a fresh alternative for acquiring important, never-before-exhibited works from both primary and secondary markets, including CONTEXT, a platform for a selection of new and established contemporary galleries showcasing emerging, mid-career and cutting-edge talent. The fair annually welcomes both experienced and new art collectors who are looking to experience a carefully-curated, rich-in-content presentation of the best in the global contemporary art market. 

Art New York, at Pier 94, will begin with an elegant, invitation-only VIP Preview event on Thursday, May 2 from 2:00 to 5:00PM. The special preview offers collectors, art advisors, curators, and media the opportunity to examine and acquire the finest works available in the market before the fair opens to the public that evening and continues through Sunday, May 5. 

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)   I Love You , 2019  Bullet Shells 72 x 36 x 48 in. (182.9 x 91.4 x 121.9 cm)  ACPB0539


Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)

I Love You, 2019
Bullet Shells
72 x 36 x 48 in. (182.9 x 91.4 x 121.9 cm)
ACPB0539

Interview with Olivia Pek Gallery Associate, Cavalier Gallery

www.cavaliergalleries.com

Tell us about your gallery and the type of art you exhibit.

Adelson Galleries (New York and Boston) and Cavalier Galleries (New York, Nantucket, Greenwich) have partnered together in opening Adelson Cavalier Galleries on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Florida. With a combined 85 years of experience in the art business, each gallery brings their expertise in the fields of Impressionism, Realism, Modernism, and Contemporary Art. Adelson Cavalier Galleries exhibits emerging and established Contemporary artists, as well as historically significant artworks by 19th and 20th Century masters. Adelson Cavalier Galleries is open year-round with rotating exhibits.  

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)   Baby Panda (Patient) , 2019  Bullet Shells 15 x 11 x 9 in. (38.1 x 27.9 x 22.9 cm)  ACPB0361

Federico Uribe (Colombian, b. 1962)
Baby Panda (Patient), 2019
Bullet Shells
15 x 11 x 9 in. (38.1 x 27.9 x 22.9 cm)
ACPB0361

Name a few artists that you are bringing to this year's Art New York Fair. 

Here are a few of the artists whose work we are exhibiting:

-Jim Rennert 

-William Nelson

-Guy Stanley Philoche

-Wolf Kahn

-Hans Hofmann

-Federico Uribe

-Magdalena Murua

What are you most excited about in terms of your booth selection this year?

We are excited to bring a fantastic selection of artists to Art New York this year. The centerpiece of our booth is the astonishing mixed media piece,  I Love You, by Colombian artist Federico Uribe. Just a few blocks away, at our gallery on 57th Street, our 3,800 square foot ground floor space is currently dedicated to the outstanding work of Federico Uribe, with his solo exhibition “Mesmerized,” on view through June 1st.  

Please share a few tips for fair visitors or new collectors.

Bring your checkbook!