Posts tagged art
Are you making the one mistake that is keeping your art from being featured?
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We’ve seen it happen time and again and artists have asked us about this when considering what to submit to our magazine or new gallery, PxP Contemporary. Think that including images from multiple series of works will double or triple your chances of being selected for that juried show, publication or gallery you’ve dreamed of showing with? Well, unfortunately, that’s not likely the case. I know that it’s tempting to want to show off the range of your style and creative ability, but here’s why this isn’t the time to do so.

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  • Demonstrate to the juror that you’ve taken time to really develop an idea, push yourself and stick to it! When you focus on one subject for a while, you get a much better idea of what works and what doesn’t and this helps you build your creative voice. Always keep in mind that submitting your work is like a leaving a first impression. If you have pieces from two bodies of work it can give off the vibe that you don’t quite know who you are yet as an artist or that you’re not confident enough in either series to commit to it fully. I’ll borrow from Kat here and say that you should always be sharing work that excites you! Which paintings, drawings, sculptures, or (insert whatever incredible work you create here) are you most excited about right now? Those are what you should be submitting!

  • Sometimes, it’s purely practical. For publications especially, it is difficult to consider an artist if we wouldn’t be able to put together a consistent spread with their work. Each book, journal, or magazine will have a distinct aesthetic so make it easy for them to know that you are the right fit and to feature your work. The same applies to a gallery, which has to make sure that your work could fill their space and look professional. They are also looking out for their collectors, who come to them specifically for their curatorial expertise. Rather than show them everything in the hopes that they end up buying something (with the risk of overwhelming them), a good dealer will work with the client to help them find something they love from a narrower selection based on their interest and budget. Collectors do often want to see a variety of works, but still within the same theme or style.

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  • If you are equally satisfied with several bodies of work at the moment, I’d still recommend only applying with one or at least one at a time. The biggest issue with this is that you’re leaving the curator to fill in the blanks and assuming that they can or will. How is someone who is not familiar with your work supposed to imagine what the rest of a series looks like when they’ve only seen a few pieces from it? You know that a whole group of works exists that are as great as the ones you’ve submitted, but the curator does not. If they have to go through hundreds or even thousands of artist submissions, they won’t always have the time to go looking through your website or Instagram account to see if you’ve made others like the one or two that they did like.

  • If you’ve recently started a new body of work that you’re wondering if you should start putting out there, make sure it’s ready. Do you have enough works from this series completed and photographed? If not, what’s the rush? There will be more opportunities to apply to. You can keep submitting from an earlier series for now if you want and if there is no restriction from the organization on how recent the work must be or simply allow yourself the time to fully dive into this great new idea.

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Of course, none of this is to say that you have to stick to the same thing forever. No, on the contrary, because it would be hard to have repeat collectors if your work never develops. Your gallery, if you have one, and your collectors simply want to see you continue to grow and will support you along the way!

If you’re making abstract sculptures, but have always wanted to try painting cats, go ahead! One of the greatest things about being an artist is having the freedom to experiment with your creativity. Ultimately, you have to DO YOU. But when it comes time to apply to that next exhibition opportunity, I hope you’ll consider the above and give yourself the best chance of being selected!

As always, both Kat and I are happy to answer any art career questions you have so please feel free to reach out to us: info@createmagazine.com or alicia@createmagazine.com and if you liked this article, check out the Art & Cocktails podcast or our new book The Smartist Guide for more tips.

Cheers and I wish you luck in applying to our current call for Issue 15 curated by Paradigm Gallery! Submit here.

-Alicia


Tiny Room For Elephants Festival in Philadelphia | April 19th-21st
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After speaking with the organizers, Create! Magazine is thrilled to be supporting TRFE and their upcoming event in April! Learn more about this exciting festival in Philadelphia that combines art, music and more below.

Tiny Room for Elephants Festival (#TRFE19) is a month long, collaborative, multi genre art and music experience, held throughout the month of April at Cherry Street Pier.  It is a living art ‘gallery’ that incorporates styles and mediums of 25+ Philadelphia artists painting/installing live from April 8th-April 17th. The finished works are celebrated on April 19th, April 20th and April 21st with live music, djs/producers, panels and interactive elements. 

The organizers, Dame & YaYa

The organizers, Dame & YaYa

The schedule of events is as follows:

Opening Exhibition 

Date: Friday, April 19, 2019

Time: 6:00pm-10pm

Fun Stuff:  Standing Room Only, A Wearable Art Show

Sounds: Camp Candle, Club Crusades, Eric Boss, Johnny Popcorn, Joshua Lang

Music Series

Date: Saturday, April 20, 2019

Time: 9:00am-9:00pm

Fun stuff:   Day Breaker (Tickets sold separately) "1000 Ways to Make It", panel moderated by Cosmo Baker; Live screen printing w/ Do It Now; Sticker Make & Take (Sticker Stampede); DIY Donut Station w/ Federal Donuts

Sounds: Aime, Cierra, Drew Mills, Emynd, Eric Boss, Expo, Femi, Jabair, John Morrison, Kayin x Sylo, Killiam Shakespeare, Kingsley Ibeneche, Mellowbastard, Pierson, Rover Rover, Shane tha Great, Suzanne Sheer, Tha Riva, The Bul Bey

Family Fun Day

Date: Sunday, April 21, 2019

Time: 12:00pm-6:00pm

Fun Stuff:  Easter Egg Hunt, World's Largest Kid's Sip n' Paint (tickets sold seperately), Sticker Make & Take (Sticker Stampede)

Sounds: Lee Jones & Friends

Sponsored in part by: YARDSPhiladelphia Weekly, HabithequeDo It Now T ShirtsFederal Donuts, Joe Werner ProductionsBlickTru WaveThe ParlorBeauMonde OriginalsChampionDWRC

Ida Ivanka Kubler at Salena Gallery, LIU Brooklyn

Artist Ida Ivanka Kubler will be presenting a solo exhibition of paintings entitled "Birth of an Idea" at Salena Gallery, LIU Brooklyn. The show will run from September 4 - October 26 with an opening reception on Wednesday, September 12 between 6 and 8pm. 

LIU Brookyn
Salena Gallery

First Floor, Library Learning Center
1 University Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Gallery Hours: Monday-Friday 9 am-6 pm, Saturday-Sunday, 10 am – 5 pm
Travel: B, Q, R to DeKalb Avenue; 2, 3, 4, 5 to Nevins Street; A, C, F to Jay Street
For more information please contact Nancy Grove at 718-488-1198 or nancy.grove@liu.edu

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Ida Ivanka Kubler (born January 3, 1978, Bulgaria) is an international artist based in New York.

“Up to my 7th year, I lived with my grandparents in a small village in South Bulgaria, almost at the border to Greece. The village was well known for its silkworm sericulture. I often was sitting under the mulberry trees, painting silk cocoons with reddish paint I made from crushed red bricks. The silk cocoons became the initial material for my artwork.” (2012)

Organic in appearance and abstract in presence, Kubler's Birth of an Idea series features simple circle settings consisting of an abundance of painted and sculptured silk cocoons positioned on large canvases. Using what she calls “imaginative touch”, Kubler transforms cocoons left behind by the silk moth from their original identity into transcendent assemblages of colors and shapes reminiscent of Indian Mandalas or ancient Greek mosaics.

Ms. Kubler’s Birth of an Idea series has been recognized by the Behring Institute for Medical Research as having a positive influence on public health. She has worked worldwide, including in Germany, France,  Bulgaria, Norway, USA and the UK and has a wide base of international collectors. Ms. Kubler attended the National Academy of Arts, Sofia, Bulgaria; the University of Applied Arts, Bielefeld, Germany; and the Chelsea College of Art and Design, London, UK. 

Ida Ivanka Kubler is fiscally sponsored by The Solo Foundation, a 501(c)3 non-profit, tax exempt organization providing artists and not-for-profit organizations with operational and programmatic assistance.

Artist Statement

Capturing the beauty of transformation, the empty cocoon represents the completed process of change and its success. The brightness of the colors celebrates the transition from one state of being to another and honors its glorious unfoldment. The arrangement of the cocoons within the circular shape represents unity and connection. The contrast in colors creates a center point on which to focus the mind.  It is within the cocoon, in isolation and in silence, that the metamorphosis happens. This is true for the human mind as well. Similar to a mandala and its incredible potential to assist in the practice of meditation, the Birth of an Idea series expands on this tool by incorporating nature into its structure. As such, the viewer enters and experiences the artwork, be it consciously or in a trance-like state, and is encouraged to pause and remember the healing power of stillness and silence that resides within each of us.

Shayna Silverman - "The Grand Sketch"

Shayna Silverman is currently based in Amsterdam, but she hails from New York.  She got her artistic start by drawing on the kitchen floor with crayons, but today her preferred mediums are watercolors and pen and ink on cold press paper.  She is inspired by sunny destinations, the craziness of city life, and all subjects equine or canine.  She attended New York University, from which she received a Bachelor of Arts in French with a minor in Economics.  For the past nine years, she worked as a strategy consultant in New York and Paris, but she recently decided to take a break from consulting to pursue her lifelong dream of becoming an illustrator.    

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I think a lot of artists got their start by doodling with crayons as a kid! Did you have the jumbo box with 120 colors? I loved that. How did you continue to develop your drawing and painting skills growing up? Did you take classes independently or are you more self-taught? Were you still dedicating a fair amount of time to making art even during your early career in strategy consulting?

We had everything at home growing up!  Crayons, markers, colored pencils, pastels, the Sculpey polymer clay you bake in the oven, and more.  My mom was an artist who did decorative painting with acrylics – first on furniture and later on textiles – so our house was always filled with art supplies.  Ironically, I never painted that much when I was little and now I wish that I had let my mom teach me.

My preferred technique was drawing and I had a huge set of Prismacolor colored pencils.  Many years later when I was a management consultant, one of my clients was the company who owns the Prismacolor brand and I got the chance to shop in the company store.  It was a dream come true!

Aside from one watercolor painting class that I took at The New York Studio School when I was a consultant, I am pretty much self-taught, though.  While I was a consultant, I would sneak in time to do travel sketches on vacation (or okay, maybe the occasional doodle in the margins of my work notebooks), but otherwise my creativity was limited to the confines of PowerPoint!  

Tell us a bit about the transition to illustrating. What was the turning point that made you decide to go after your lifelong dream full-time? 

I have always loved art, but I guess that I always felt a little bit of pressure to follow a more traditional career path.  When I graduated from college I had student loans and I wanted to stay in New York (but it’s expensive!), so consulting seemed like a responsible choice.  The further I progressed on the consulting career track, the riskier it seemed to leave.

That all changed when I transferred to the Paris office of my consulting firm.  One of my lifelong dreams was to work abroad. However, once in France, I was working even more grueling hours than I had in the US and I didn’t even have enough time to visit Paris!  Although, I must admit that I was still able to eat my fair share of croissants. Then my boyfriend found a job in Amsterdam and while I was researching my visa options in the Netherlands, I discovered the Dutch American Friendship Treaty visa for American entrepreneurs and I realized that I might have a shot at obtaining it as a freelance artist.  I said to myself that it was now or never!

Where did the name 'The Grand Sketch" come from? Did you consider using your name? 

I did consider using my name, but I decided that I wanted to have a little flexibility with branding until I decided on the style I wanted to use.  I chose the name “The Grand Sketch” because I wanted the name to immediately convey the product being sold. I also liked the juxtaposition of the word “grand”, which suggests an elaborate, impressive work, with the word “sketch”, which implies a rough or unfinished product.  One of my goals in my painting is to have an economy of line that expresses the same emotion as an elaborate painting but without all of the fuss. Finally and most importantly, though, the domain name and instagram handle were available!

Describe a few of your sources of inspiration and how or why they influence your work.

I have always found the craziness of city life endlessly inspirational, if not exhausting!  In New York there are so many eccentric characters everywhere, and so much energy! Amsterdam is wonderful in different ways – the beautiful canals and quiet streets, the take no prisoner cyclists, and the moody weather.  I also love painting horses and dogs. It is a real pleasure to capture their movement and expressions.

What is your process like to create a work from start to finish? Feel free to talk about materials here too. How long does one piece usually take and do you work on more than one at a time? 

I tend to start out by taking a lot of reference photos of the subject that I want to paint.  Then I move to a pencil sketch (with lots of erasing)! When I am checking proportions, I tend to take a photo of the drawing and crop it to the same size as the reference photo and then flip back and forth between the two.  This allows me to spot errors in the proportions. Once I think that I have finished the drawing, I always leave it alone for a day and come back to it to make final corrections before I start to paint. It’s like that dress that you wanted to buy in a store – it’s always easier to have perspective on what you truly need when you look at things with a fresh eye!

For the painting, I often do landscapes on cold press watercolor paper, and more detailed paintings or portraits on hot press paper.  When I am painting horses or dogs, I first do an underpainting of ultramarine blue and van dyke brown to set the values. Then I layer color on top.

While portraits tend to take eight or more hours, I find that lately I have been spending more time on detailed city scapes that require a little bit more ruler work.

I prefer to work on multiple pieces at a time and switch between them to prevent myself from getting bored, but when I have a commission, that takes priority.

Are you working on any upcoming projects, collaborations or exhibitions? 

I am currently preparing for an exhibition at the coworking space The Thinking Hut in Amsterdam.  The theme of the exhibition is Holland and I am painting everything from the canals of Amsterdam to modern – and humorous – takes on the cultural trademarks of Holland (Delft pottery, cows, stroopwafel).  I also have a few commissions in the works, which are all dog portraits.

What are your goals in the coming year? 5 years? 

In the next five years, I would like to eventually find representation with the right gallery, as well as with an illustration agency.  It would be great to do illustrations for luxury brands or editorial work. I would also like to write and illustrate a children’s book, but I think that is more on the five-year horizon.

For more of Shayna's work, you can visit her website or follow her on Instagram here.

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"All That You Have Is Your Soul" opens at FACTION Art Projects February 1st

FACTION Art Projects presents their inaugural exhibition, All That You Have Is Your Soul, a group show of 17 artists, all of whom are tied together by their responses to building identity within a foreign land. The exhibition uses the link of heritage between the artists to present artworks that celebrate differences in identity.

Artists from disparate generations and with diverse histories come together to create a community through the narratives of their art. All That You Have Is Your Soul presents a microcosm of the wider global community, one that attempts autonomy from social constraints and looks beyond the boundaries of borders and political divisions to focus on and celebrate the individuality of the human soul.

Each artist in the show has some relationship to Cuba, some island-born emigres, some with careers developed in Cuba and others with a more distant descendance. This starting point, a key point of identity for some, but not for others, offers a tangible bond in their linked roots, but the overriding premise is that as a group they mean to redefine themselves within their unique circumstance.

Exhibitions on Cuban art thus far have tended to establish borders and define their subject through polarization: generations, inside/outside, national/foreign, made in the Island versus created elsewhere. In a world of fusing boundaries and erased frontiers, is there a need to be defined by these terms? The claim of “Cubanidad” for contemporary art has become in most of the cases an artificial construction that complies with commercial, institutional or political interests.

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All That You Have Is Your Soul on the contrary, invites participants to express their own opinions on what it means, fundamentally to be an artist. The struggle of being of an artist, regardless of background, is visible in the physical manifestations of their practice. Inevitably, each perspective is different, and it is only through this that we can truly begin to comprehend the complexity of human creativity.

Armando Marino, Co-curator and artist exhibiting in the show says: “I wanted to add my story of what it means to be an artist, in spite of what I was born, to those of others, seeking to demonstrate that although we have our roots in the same place, every story is truly unique. All That You Have Is Your Soul offers an insight into the distinct ways in which artists have rebuilt their identities, and reimagined themselves within new environments.”

Curating alongside Armando Marino is Meyken Barreto, who says: “This exhibition bets on the understanding of identity as an open and liquid concept, which is constantly redefined and enriched. The artists gathered here come from different circumstances and their work departs from very diverse premises. With this exhibition we want to subtract weight from the well-worn “Cuban Art” label, and in a way relativize or undermine this notion.”

Notable artists include Ernesto Pujol (Havana, Cuba 1957), a site-specific performance artist, social choreographer, and educator with an interdisciplinary practice, Alejandro Aguilera (Holguin, Cuba 1964) who creates abstract work with strong references to his recent memories of Cuba, Anthony Goicolea (Atlanta, Georgia 1971) a multidisciplinary artist who draws on themes from personal history and identity, to cultural tradition, alienation and displacement, Maria Magdalena Campos Pons (La Vega, Cuba 1959) with autobiographical work investigating themes of history, memory, gender and religion and how they inform identity and Juana Valdes (Pinar Del Rio, Cuba 1963) whose work explores current migration processes and critiques race, gender, and mobility.

A central theme for the show is the celebration of diversity. The artists involved are of a variety of ages, genders, sexualities and races. The location of Harlem, New York is significant as a place that is thriving with a culturally diverse community. Its rich mix of people make it a platform from which to embrace difference, without preconceived notions of race and culture. The show does not present the artificially conceptualized "national art". The artists here reunited do belong in a certain kind of nation, but it is an expanded and infinite one; the contemporary nation of the Art World.

Throughout the show FACTION will seek to engage with local communities of the Harlem
neighborhood. This will include a series of School Workshops, Curators’ Talks, a Family Opening, Artist Workshops, Panel Discussions and a Cuban Cultural Evening. Speakers include: Joaquin Badajoz, Ernesto Mendez Conde, Meyken Barreto and Juana Valdez.

FACTION is a new flexible collective, from the team behind the hugely successful Gallery 8 and Coates & Scarry in London, who in this, their foray into the US, are adapting a unique model for artists and gallerists to work together.

FACTION is a well needed response to the changing market place and the erosion of the traditional art market, where galleries were gatekeepers for artists. FACTION aims to reimagine these relationships through unique collaborative projects, curated either by the team themselves, or by talented guest curators such as with All That You Have Is Your Soul. FACTION provides artists with promotion and opportunity to access collectors and a wider audience, with all the support of a gallery but without the constraints of the traditional model.

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For more information please contact Anna Beketov, Damson PR at anna.beketov@damsonpr.com or +44 (0)20 7812 0645.

All That You Have Is Your Soul
Curated by Meyken Barreto and Armando Marino
FACTION @ Gallery 8 NY
2602 Frederick Douglass Boulevard
NY 10030

February 2nd to March 10th, 2018
Private View February 1st 6.30-9.30pm

FACTION’s inaugural New York project celebrates the building of identity from a common heritage within a community engaging Harlem exhibition.

Artists:
Alejandro Aguilera, Anthony Goicolea, Armando Mariño, Ariel Cabrera Montejo, Elsa Mora, Enrique De Molina Ernesto Pujol, Geandy Pavon, Jairo Alfonso, Juan Carlos Quintana, Juan Miguel Pozo, Juana Valdes Maria Magdalena Campos Pons, Marc Dennis, Maritsa Molina, Marta Maria Perez, Pavel Acosta, Quisqueya Enriquez

FACTION is a team of three partners - Celine Gauld, Richard Scarry and Dean Coates - each coming to the art world with unique experience and skill sets. Celine Gauld has a background in art history, and 20 years’ experience running art galleries in central London. Richard Scarry has over 15 years’ experience working at auction houses, not for profit and contemporary galleries in Los Angeles. Having relocated to the UK, he became a founding partner of Coates and Scarry in 2011. Dean Coates is a practising artist and academic and holds a Masters Degree in Ceramics. He has many years’ experience working in education and with community arts groups.

Marion Griese

Marion Griese completed a degree in Fine Arts from the University of Toronto in 1992. After travelling and working in Europe, she studied jewellery art and design for two years at Vancouver Community College. These two art forms have allowed her to explore ideas and concepts from different angles. A found object may inspire a painting, which consequently may inspire a piece of jewellery. Other times, the jewellery may spark ideas for a painting. She has a deep appreciation for balance, proportion and colour and looks to both natural and urban forms for inspiration. She is currently focusing her time on a new series of abstract paintings. Marion Griese resides in the Niagara area of Southern Ontario with her family, where she teaches art to young children.

Artist Statement:

My approach to painting is intuitive, yet also imbued with my years of studying art and design. Whether I turn to the natural or the urban environment for inspiration, I am always looking for a dialogue between colour and form. I am so interested in how notes of colour can play off of one another to transport and even transform us. My current work begins with lines rooted in organic shapes to form the structure of the composition. Sinuous lines intersect across the canvas to reveal shapes which are then given colour from a palette I observe around me, or sometimes draw from the hues of memories, poetry or music. The intertwining of the creative challenge and sense of serenity I experience when composing my paintings is what I find most compelling and rewarding.

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You talk about the colors in your current body of work as being inspired by the hues of memories, poetry and music. Can you be more specific? In what way do certain moments, written works or songs speak to you? 

I find inspiration in many places, often in the everyday moments when I am just walking outdoors and observing my surroundings. It may be the colour of a shadow falling alongside a house or the bright neon of a street sign that I remember and bring back to the canvas. Today it’s the grey/blue Canadian winter sky forewarning snow. I take artistic cues from many writers and musicians, too. Michael Ondaatje is one poet and novelist whose writing style has had a great impact on me. His poem “To A Sad Daughter” remains one of my favourites for its beautiful colour imagery and metaphors that define the mood of the scene he’s portraying. The music of the Canadian band The Tragically Hip and the poetic lyrics of Gord Downie have also long inspired me. It is not only the words, but also the variations of sounds, rhythms and the experience of the music that makes its way into my work. It is the nature of what I experience through my surroundings, or music or words that I am trying to relay - not literally, but through tones and shapes of colours that meet or overlap. A fitting quote I like that is attributed to Leonardo da Vinci goes: “Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.”

How did this series develop? Have your paintings always focused on color and form?

Like most artists, I’ve explored different styles, mediums and subjects over the years and so my work has gone through many changes. In previous years my paintings were more expressive in style and landscape was the focus of my interest. My current work grew out of art I produced for the 100 Day Project in 2015, where I committed to painting a 6 x 6 abstract for 100 days. To move away from painting a subject to relying on intuition was challenging and intimidating. Stepping into that uncertainty required me to quiet my mind and trust all that I'd learned and studied for the last 30 years! I discovered that in just showing up every day I was developing a new visual “language” for myself that I had not anticipated. I felt I was also beginning to get clearer on what was important to me artistically. In some ways my art, whether painting, illustration or even jewellery has had elements of the work I do now, but the focus had not been solely on colour and form. Removing some of the details and simplifying the composition allowed me to concentrate more on how a piece might make one feel, rather than what it might make one think.

In addition to painting, you also create jewelry. How do you balance working in both - and very different - mediums?

Making time for two different art practices is difficult, especially when coupled with being a parent and having a part-time job. At this moment I’m not actively working on jewellery projects, but focusing what time I have on painting. On occasion though, I make sketches for jewellery pieces when ideas come to mind, or make small samples out of wax, or get asked to make a commissioned piece. I continue to find working on jewellery as exciting as making a painting and I really enjoy translating a two-dimensional image into a 3D form. I hope to include more jewellery work to my studio practice in the coming years. I’m so interested in other artists who work in various disciplines – like Tapio Wirkkala, who worked in metal, glass, ceramics, jewellery and sculpture.

Does teaching inform or affect your practice as well?

Teaching young children is such a privilege! I began teaching art to young children over 10 years ago and feel as though it has informed my work in many ways. One of the things that I enjoy most is researching artists from the past or present and building a lesson around the work that will be fun, experimental and exciting for the kids. At the same time, it fulfills my own curiosity and I've come to discover the work of so many people that I may not have known before. Something I also enjoy and admire in young children is their inhibition and willingness to experiment. I love watching them choose colours or describe the details of their illustrations. Their fearlessness and sense of fun are a good lesson for me. I am reminded to enjoy the process, mistakes and all, and to not take myself so seriously.

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Can you explain your creative process? What does a piece go through from your initial idea to the completed painting? 

I am someone who needs movement first thing in the morning, so after my household has emptied and I have walked the dog and had my run, my mind is settled enough to start my studio practice. I will often flip through art books or my sketchbooks for inspiration, spend some time researching other artists online or organizing my space. I used to feel like I was procrastinating, but I’m realizing that this time of transition is important. To get a painting started I draw a few lines and shapes that interest me and then after some contemplation, I begin to add colour. I work intuitively to orchestrate the forms and colours, all the while being conscious of how the painting feels. The initial layer of the painting will change many times as I constantly rotate the canvas and stand back to have a look. I also like to take photos of the work-in-progress, as it gives me another frame in which to see areas that feel right or may still need work. A painting may, depending on its size, be finished in a few hours or a few days. I like to work on many paintings at a time, both large and small.

What is the best art-related advice you have received? 

I have come across a lot of great advice over the years from creatives who have generously shared insights about living an artist's life. One piece of advice that I've embraced and appreciate the most is the idea of “showing up” everyday. Steven Pressfield speaks to this in his wonderful book The War of Art and even Picasso knew this when he said, “Inspiration exists, but it has to find you working.” Ideas generate ideas. To keep the momentum going you have to practice – regularly. This also means accepting the mistakes and the work that just isn't very good. It’s hard for me, but I’m trying to remind myself that it’s about the process and that the lessons within the mistakes are valuable. 

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CAMA Gallery - London's first space dedicated solely to Iranian Art

In late November 2017, CAMA Gallery launched an exhibition of 30 Iranian artists in anticipation of opening their permanent space in London’s St. James’ in early 2018.

CAMA Gallery are the pioneering market leaders in Modern & Contemporary Iranian art. Following the success of their live online gallery and exhibiting space in Tehran, they now look forward to the inauguration of their new London gallery in St. James’. CAMA marked their arrival in the capital with an exclusive drinks reception at London’s iconic Hotel Café Royal in Mayfair.

The opening reception event centered around an exhibition showcasing the works of Iran’s best contemporary and modern artists, including the masters Sohrab Sepehri, Bahman Mohasses and Parviz Tanavoli. Committed to bringing the booming and increasingly accessible Iranian art scene to the heart of London, CAMA offer access to exclusive, premier works. CAMA Gallery aims to be a leading force in the growth and expansion of the art industry in Iran and the Middle East. CAMA showcases art of all genres in physical galleries and online, offering contemporary artists exposure and global recognition.

Artists exhibiting at the launch:
Mansour Ghandriz, Parviz Tanavoli, Jafar Rouhbakhsh, Massoud Arabshahi, Nasser Ovissi, Sohrab Sepehri, Monir Farmanfarmaian, Manouchehr Yektai, Bahman Mohasses, Reza Mafi, Sirak Melkonian, Mohammad Ehsaei, Abdolreza Daryabeygi, Nasrollah Afjehei, Parviz Kalantari, Ebrahim Faraji, Hossein Mahjoubi, Manouchehr Motabar, Hossein Ali Zabehi, Taha Behbahani, Jamshid Samavatian, Behzad Shishegaran, Nosratollah Moslemian, Reza Hosseini, Maryam Salour, Ali Nasir, Ali Nedaei, Fereydoun Omidi, Bita Vakili, and Masoud Keshmiri

Images below are works by artists included in the exhibition or represented by CAMA. Please visit the gallery website for more information or contact Anna Beketov, Damson PR: anna.beketov@damsonpr.com or +44 (0)20 7812 0645.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Vivian Horan Fine Art

Vivian Horan

Owner of Vivian Horan Fine Art

35 East 67th Street

New York, NY 10065

info@vivianhoran.com

Mel Bochner, Blah, Blah, Blah, 2013, Monoprint with collage, engraving, and embossment on hand-dyed Twinrocker handmade paper, 11 7/8 x 10 inches, 30.2 x 25.4 cm, Signed and dated on right recto in graphite

Mel Bochner, Blah, Blah, Blah, 2013, Monoprint with collage, engraving, and embossment on hand-dyed Twinrocker handmade paper, 11 7/8 x 10 inches, 30.2 x 25.4 cm, Signed and dated on right recto in graphite

What is the gallery's focus at this year's fair?

This year, we will be focusing on emerging and mid – career contemporary artists from across the world.

Are there specific artists or works that collectors should pay attention to at your booth?  

We are very excited to be bringing a Nick Cave Sound Suit, a Jenny Holzer Led sign from the Survival Series, Blah, Blah, Blah by Mel Bochner, and work by the Light and Space Californian, Peter Alexander. Further, we are bringing the work of Paul O’Connor, an artist from Taos, New Mexico, who has an amazing understanding of metals and their alchemic effects. Paul will be included in our spring gallery show featuring Taos artists.

Rob Wynne,   Over the Rainbow , 2010, Poured and mirrored glass in 15 parts, 45 x 55 inches 114.3 x 139.7 cm, Signed and dated on verso of the last letter ‘W'

Rob Wynne, Over the Rainbow, 2010, Poured and mirrored glass in 15 parts, 45 x 55 inches 114.3 x 139.7 cm, Signed and dated on verso of the last letter ‘W'

What are some of your favorite aspects of being a part of Art Miami?

As this is our first year at Art Miami, we are excited to see what it brings – and thrilled to go from spectator to participant.

Please give our readers a few tips for making the most of attending art fairs based on your experience. 

1)   Visit Art Miami first! We would hate for you to miss the great works before they are gone.

2)   Take your time, and do not do too much. It is very easy to become overwhelmed, causing works to blur.

Jee Won Park

I’m a 25-year-old South Korean girl based in Rome. I’ve never studied digital art nor attended art-related courses, but I’ve always loved editing photos to reproduce the colours, lights and 'moods' I see or imagine while taking photos with my iPhone. 

I started editing photos for my Instagram account in February 2017, and from simple landscape photos I started editing pictures combining flowers and bubbles, which became the 2 main elements of most of my art. Both flowers and bubbles are colourful and their colours are always different. I love playing with colours and lights; sometimes I feel like I'm discovering myself. Now I also create images from blank page, and my art ranges from collage art to animated photos.  

Learn more.

Shimmering Zen, A new solo exhibition by James Stanford

James Stanford’s diverse practice includes photography, digital illustration, painting, and drawing. Stanford studied painting at the University of Washington (UW) (MFA) and the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) (BFA). Dedicated to creativity and the fine arts, he has taught at UNLV and UW, established the Smallworks Gallery, and curated exhibitions at various venues, including the Las Vegas Contemporary Arts Center.

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American artist James Stanford presents Shimmering Zen, an extraordinary new exhibition of Contemporary Buddhist art, featuring modern mandalas that premieres as part of Asian Art in London 2017 week, opening at 99 Kensington Church Street on Thursday 2 November through Saturday 11 November.

Using historic Las Vegas neon signage and architectural elements from the 1950s and 1960s, shot in the Mojave Desert, Stanford artfully creates digital montages, mesmerizing designs using unique newly developed purpose specific technology. Stanford’s group of intriguing digital reconfigurations convey and respond to the potency of the mandala as a symbol, and its influence and importance to Asian culture worldwide.

As a leading maker of contemporary mandalas, Stanford’s work is an interpretation of the ancient traditions of Buddhism, drawing from historic metaphor, Chinese fable, and the aesthetics of the Tibetan Mandala. Born and raised in Nevada, Stanford grew up in a household of educators. As a young man, after a transformative and spiritual moment at the Prado Museum in Madrid opened his mind to a higher consciousness, this new spirituality became firmly entwined with his creativity. With the advent of Apple software, the tools of technology merged with his ambitious thirst for spiritual growth and education. This led to Stanford’s personal commitment to Zen Buddhism and cemented his unique creative identity.

Stanford says of his work, “Las Vegas neon signage, which I see as the former jewels of the desert night, have come together with the use modern technology, enabling me to weave it all together using the artifice of perfect symmetry into a spiritual object of meditation.”

In Stanford’s conceptually complex and visually sumptuous work, the mandala offers contemplation for both spiritual and material realities. Using a mix of traditional photographic and digital techniques, Stanford’s works are made unique and compelling by vividly illuminated moving networks and layers.

Discussing his process, James Stanford says “When I take a picture of a derelict sign I already begin to see and find the patterns and shapes that will form the final piece. Once I get the image in the studio I begin to layer the patterns created, making sure to save the patterns I particularly like; I never lose a layer of work, I simply continue to build and modify those patterns that appeal to me.”

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This visually stunning and intricately constructed modern mandala series, entitled Indra’s Jewels, will be exhibited during Asian Art in London 2017. James Stanford is a featured participant during the Dealer Open Evening event to be held at the gallery on Saturday 4 November.

The exhibition will be complemented by the official launch of Stanford’s upcoming book of the same name, Shimmering Zen, at The London Library on Friday 3 November. The book is a compilation of 150 of Stanford’s works created over the last 15 years and published in a large format hardback. Shimmering Zen offers an insight into Stanford’s creative process and inspiration allied with original images of the signs, and accompanied by nostalgic tales of his Las Vegas life, including being on the set of Viva Las Vegas with Elvis Presley and Anne-Margaret.

The book Shimmering Zen (RRP £75) will be published by Ianthe Press Limited: London and launched with the exhibition. It will include essays by the artist and the curator, and a foreword by Jeff Rosen, Vice President, The Higher Learning Commission, Evanston, Illinois. Rosen’s book Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘Fancy Subjects’: Photographic allegories of Victorian identity and empire was published recently by Manchester University Press.

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The exhibition and selling show is curated by Elizabeth Herridge, art historian, author and former Managing Director of the Guggenheim Hermitage Museum, Las Vegas as well as publisher, Ianthe Press Limited: London.

Asian Art in London 2017 brings together over sixty of the world’s top dealers, major auction houses and museums for an annual ten day celebration of the finest in Asian art. Visitors will converge in London for the 20th anniversary edition offering gallery selling exhibitions, auctions, receptions, lectures and seminars.

The Shimmering Zen Exhibition runs from Thursday 2 November through Saturday 11 November 2017 at 99 Kensington Church St, London W8 7LN.

Opening times are as follows:
Monday - Friday 09.30am - 6.30pm
Saturday, 4 November 10am - 9pm
Sunday, 5 November 10am - 6pm
Saturday, 11 November 10am - 6pm

The book Shimmering Zen (RRP £75) will be launched on Friday 3 November 2017 at The London Library, 14 St James's Square, London SW1Y 4LG 6.30-8.30pm. The event is free but spaces are limited and advance booking is recommended. To attend please email rsvp@damsonpr.com.

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For further information or to RSVP please contact: Amelia Hubert or Anna Beketov, Damson PR on 0207 812 0645 or shimmeringzen@damsonpr.com

Coming soon! The 12th Edition of the Affordable Art Fair Amsterdam

We were so excited to be invited to preview the Affordable Art Fair Amsterdam coming up at the beginning of November! Read on for more information about the fair and what to look for in this year's edition. 

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The art fair for people who have never been to an art fair. The art fair for ‘’I didn’t know I even liked contemporary art’’ art lovers.  Affordable Art Fair Amsterdam returns for its 12th edition with 65 local, national and international galleries showcasing a wide range of contemporary art. With all art priced under a €6.000 limit (incl. VAT) there is something for everyone at the fair. 

Whether you’re looking for something for the living room – or another room – or hoping to discover something to add to your growing collection, there are thousands of unique pieces of art on display. From photography to sculpture, print, painting and mixed media. Abstract and classic. It’s a whirlwind of color and visual delights. 

The Affordable Art Fair believes that art enriches lives, so we want everyone to have it! We make it easy – by having a great selection on sale with all the prices visible. This means that our gallerists are happy to help and can spend time telling you about the artist behind your new unique work. Browse, think, have a break, browse some more. Luckily, we have a great bar and restaurant to sit down and catch your breath. With some light bites and a drink under your belt, you’re ready to look again. 

Still wondering? This year you can join one of our guided tours – or catch one of our Art Talks. Or just hang out and watch our artist in residence at work. If you really know what you want – or think you do – but only have a limited amount of time, why not try out our personal shopper service? 

Tickets are €14 on the door. Kids under 16 get in free and we even welcome small to mid-sized dogs on leashes. And if you can’t decide which piece you want on your first visit – no problem! Just tell the gallery you’re interested in a piece and ask for our free re-entry pass so that you can come back.

See you in November!

2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

On view through January of next year, the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial held at the beautiful Chicago Cultural Center in the heart of the city’s downtown area is a must-see. Walking through rooms of curated exhibitions, one encounters a range of work including photography, drawings, renderings, architectural models, installations and videos by architects and artists representing over 20 countries from across the globe. This year’s Artistic Directors were Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee of LA-based firm Johnston Marklee and the opening of the Biennial coincided with the international art fair EXPO Chicago.

Photo courtesy of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. 

Photo courtesy of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. 

“The Chicago Architecture Biennial 2017 will showcase the diversity of work from around the world to examine the underpinnings of this resurgence of historical interest. Titled “Make New History,” this second edition of the Biennial will focus on the efforts—across registers of building and discursive production—of contemporary architects to align their work with versions of history. Through the lens of architecture, the Biennial aims to examine the interplay of design and the broadening access to, as well as recall of, historical source material. In the realm of building practice—from new construction to adaptive reuse to conservation—it will investigate the ways in which the architect’s encounter with a site is, in fact, the act of interpreting and responding to a prior accumulation of state and government regulations, social conventions, and markers of personhood. Considerations for architecture in the context of history include the regulation and management of power and identity; what prevails and what does not; and how to recognize the significance of untold narratives. Now, more than ever, the assumptions embedded in cultural exempla and civic imaginaries require examination and discussion.”

The Architecture of Creative Miscegenation, Marshall Brown, Chicago, USA

The Architecture of Creative Miscegenation, Marshall Brown, Chicago, USA

Filip Dujardin studied History of Art at the University of Ghent, with a specialization in architecture, before studying photography at the Academy of Ghent. After training as a technical assistant for Magnum-photographer Carl De Keyzer, he started a professional collaboration with Frederik Vercruysse. In 2007, he established himself as an independent photographer for private and public clients in the fields of architecture, interior and product design. In 2008, he presented Fictions, his first series of independent artworks. On display at the Biennial were a selection of his works featuring some of Chicago's most iconic buildings. 

The Chicago Architecture Biennial is free and open to the public. For more information on planning your visit, click here.

For even more content from the Chicago Architecture Biennial, follow them on Instagram

Photo courtesy of the Chicago Architecture Biennial.

Photo courtesy of the Chicago Architecture Biennial.

Highlights of EXPO Chicago 2017

Now in its sixth year, EXPO Chicago is proof that a thriving art community exists between those known on the two coasts. In fact, the fair’s ties to its local galleries, museums, and art schools are what set it apart and make it an annual destination for the numerous dealers and collectors who descend upon the “Windy City” each fall. This year’s fair did not disappoint – from a partnership with the Palais de Tokyo to its alignment with the Chicago Architecture Biennial, the fair continues to remain ambitious with its programming efforts.

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We were excited to be able to attend and share just a few of our selected highlights!

1. The beautiful and monumental collage portraits by Gabi Trinkaus at Claire Oliver Gallery (New York)

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2. Works by Jennifer Bolande, Julius Shulman and Alison Berger at Edward Cella Art and Architecture (Los Angeles)

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3. Lucas Simoes' incredible installation at MARSO (Mexico City)

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4. A full booth of stunning pieces by Oliver Marsden at Galeria Hilario Galguera (Mexico City)

5. The Food Chain Project by Itamar Gilboa
Almost 800 million people around the world are suffering from hunger and over 600 million are obese. Food Chain Project stems from Itamar Gilboa's will to raise awareness to global issues of hunger, obesity, overconsumption and waste by means of examining his own consumption choices. For one year, Gilboa kept a diary of everything that he ate and drank. Tamar Dresdner Art Projects presents the outcome—an installation which is a visual manifestation of everything that he consumed during twelve months and consists of numerous crystacast and chrome sculptures, each representing a food item that Gilboa had consumed. Proceeds from the sales of the sculptures will be donated to Food Tank, an NGO which supports environmentally, socially and economically sustainable ways of alleviating hunger, obesity and poverty.

6. Daniel Beltrá’s photograph Amazon (scarlet ibis) at Catherine Edelman Gallery

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Initiating the international fall art season each September, EXPO CHICAGO hosts leading international exhibitors presented alongside one of the highest quality platforms for global contemporary art and culture. The 2017 iteration presented 135 premier galleries representing 25 countries and 58 cities.  For more information on the fair, please visit their website.

Kevin Cieplensky

Kevin Cieplensky is a ceramic artist and instructor who currently maintains his practice in the Boston metro area. He received a BFA in ceramics from the State University of New York at New Paltz in 2015, and has since completed a year of post-baccalaureate studies, as well as a year-long residency at the Saratoga Clay Arts Center in Saratoga Springs, NY. His work has been shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions, and can be found in multiple private collections.

See more work on his website or Instagram page.

Artist Statement:

The natural world offers a variety of exemplary patterns and structures that express the elemental forms, components and themes that shape our experience. Ranging from microscopic building blocks like atoms, cells and molecular geometries, to the complex and infinite web of larger systems like weather patterns and galactic clusters, objects in nature conform to a strict set of formal parameters, simultaneously demonstrating elemental themes of chaos and order. My work reflects an exploration of these strict yet varied forms through a simplified geometric lens, heavily rooted in mathematics, physics and logic. By providing a visual translation of universal schema, my work offers insight to the attributes which characterize the human experience.

Bengoa Vázquez

The work of Spanish artist Bengoa Vázquez has elements of both the whimsical and surreal. While her compositions tend to be minimalist with muted tones, the juxtapositions between the various subjects and the illusion of depth through layering creates a strong visual impact. Follow her on Instagram here to see more amazing work!

I always
try to suggest using symbolic elements

I habitually
experiment with new languages

I still
try to be committed

I often
found the duality I am seeking

I am occasionally
able to instil a feeling

I sometimes
would like to be more direct

I rarely
refrain from mixing different disciplines

I hardly ever
endeavour to create art, just to express myself

I never
face a new project without having done some
reflecting on it

Pause. The explorer wanders through the space trying to find a corner that is sufficiently her own.

Bengoa Vázquez is an illustrator and set and graphic designer based in Madrid where she also teaches at Centro Universitario de Artes TAI.

Art, ArticlesAlicia Puigart, artist