Posts tagged art fair
May 1st is Collectors Day at Moniker Art Fair
Moniker London 2016. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Moniker London 2016. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

We’re just a few days away from Moniker Art Fair and in addition to all of the exciting things planned throughout its run, this year, the fair will be kicking off with a special opening event called Collectors Day. Read on to learn more!

Moniker Art Fair is pleased to introduce Collectors Day, a unique concept designed to encourage art buying from fairs, galleries and artists alike. Taking place on opening day, May 1st, 2019 at the fair’s new NoHo location, 718 Broadway, this exploratory initiative challenges and defies the traditional VIP vernissage for art fairs. Providing more than a VIP preview, the day fosters education and accessibility to art collecting through a series of talks and Q&A’s led by collectors, gallery directors, curators, and artists. Moniker’s second New York edition will take place on May 1-5, 2019.

Collectors Day will feature tours across the expansive, multi-level fair lead by Moniker Director Tina Ziegler. Special programming for the day will include panel discussions with art world professionals on a wide range of topics that matter both to veteran and emerging collectors including: how and why to collect contemporary art, the best way to approach building a collection, and investment opportunities and elitism within the art world.

Fair Director Tina Ziegler says, “Collectors Day means real, mature discussion on subjects that matter to our collectors. What are the pros and cons of buying direct from artists? How long can it take for art to mature significantly in value? How do I even begin collecting? These are all things we can and should answer, and we can’t wait to see the effect Collectors Day has on our guests.” Collectors Day will also host talks led by accomplished collectors, gallery directors, curators and artists. Moniker’s approach to the new programming for this New York edition is the latest in a series of initiatives that Moniker has undertaken over the last 10 years to make art collecting accessible to the public.

Photo courtesy of Evoca 1 and Moniker Art Fair.

Photo courtesy of Evoca 1 and Moniker Art Fair.

As part of the Collectors Day program collectors will have a chance to hear short presentations from galleries and Spotlight Artists. The 2019 New York edition continues to exemplify the fair’s commitment to exhibiting the depth and breadth of urban contemporary art from across the globe. 2019 New York edition participating galleries include Vinyl on Vinyl Gallery, Philippines; Mazel Galerie, Brussels; Damien Roman Fine Art, The Hamptons; Fousion Gallery, Barcelona with Spotlight artists WK Interact, Christian Boehmer, Evoca 1, ICY & SOT who are recognized leaders in the urban and new contemporary art movement.

Partners for the Collectors Day include: Art Money, Art Law, Barnebys Auction House, Greenpoint Innovators, It’s a Small World, Juxtapoz Magazine, Norwood Club, Soho House, and Tagsmart among others.

Opening of Moniker Art Fair 2019 | 3pm

Drinks Reception and welcome to the fair | 3pm - 4pm

Fair Tour with Fair Director Tina Ziegler | 4:30pm - 5:30pm

Each person will receive headsets for the tour so they can hear the tour throughout the fair. Each exhibitor will get 5 minutes to introduce their collection to the tour. This gives collectors a guided one-on-one with each gallery and artist.

Collecting Art 101: Starting a Collection | 5:30pm

This program explores questions every new collector should ask themselves: how do you define your personal taste as a collector? What type of collector are you? How to purchase art for passion and purpose?

Collecting Art 101: Investing in Art | 6:15pm

A round table discussion on how collectors control the market, why it’s important to collect in today’s climate, and the good and bad aspects of buying art on Instagram. Guest Speakers include: Derek Gores, Professional Artist, part of the Open Studios Program; Jonathan Levine, Director of Jonathan Levine Gallery (New York); Evan Pricco Editor-in-Chief of Juxtapoz Magazine; Damien A Roman, Director of Damien Roman Fine Art Gallery, The Hamptons; Yasha Young Director and Curator of Urban Nation Museum, Berlin; Tina Ziegler, Director and Curator of Moniker Art Fair.

Additional speakers and programming to be announced.

Mural program, Moniker London 2015. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Mural program, Moniker London 2015. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Dates:

Wednesday, 1st May
VIP Collectors Day: 3pm - 10pm
Ticket price: $75 (Including a $50 credit towards any purchased artwork)

Thursday, 2nd May
Public Opening: 12pm - 9pm

Friday, 3rd May
Fair Open: 12pm - 9pm

Saturday, 4th May
Fair Open: 11am - 8pm

Sunday, 6th May
Fair Open: 11am - 6pm

FREE Entrance Times:
Access to the fair is free to all members of the public for 90 minutes each day.
Thursday 12pm - 1:30pm
Friday 12pm - 1:30pm
Sunday 11am -12:30pm

Location
718 Broadway, NoHo, Manhattan, New York, 10003

Website
www.monikerartfair.com

Hashtag
#monikerNY19 #monikerartfair

Twitter
@monikerartfair

Instagram
@monikerartfair

Facebook
www.facebook.com/monikerartfair

Christian Böhmer Interview | Moniker Art Fair
Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

For our next preview feature from the upcoming Moniker Art Fair in New York, we’re sharing an interview with Christian Böhmer! Christian is a self-taught contemporary artist who creates large-scale murals along with drawings and paintings. He has exhibited work around the world including in Australia, Germany, The Netherlands, and Switzerland among others. Most recently, he completed a mural painting for the "one wall project" curated by the Urban Nation Museum of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. After learning more about his work and process, we’ll certainly be looking forward to seeing what he exhibits at the fair!

Tell us about your background. You describe having roots in the graffiti movement of the 90's so was this the type of art that first inspired you and that you first created? 

Yes, graffiti was the kind of art that influenced me most when I was a kid in the mid-nineties. I was lucky enough to live only a few kilometers from Europe’s largest legal graffiti hall of fame at that time, which was the famous "Schlachthof Wiesbaden". Once a year, there came the world’s most famous writers together to have a graffiti jam for one weekend. I was so fascinated to see what was possible to do just with a spray can, that I decided to try this on my own. As it was a legal spot to paint graffiti, there was no need to hurry or to get nervous. I think this is why I had time enough to experiment in every direction, which included painting characters, too. I found out that I had much more talent in character painting then in writing letters....

How has your work developed since then? When and why did you turn to portraits? 

The first few years I developed in painting characters and as I got better and better, I moved towards a photorealistic style. I believe the most difficult subject one can paint in photorealism is a portrait, where there are no mistakes allowed. And when you dive into this world of painting portraits, you find out that there’s a lot of stories you can tell with that kind of art.

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Images courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Images courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Can you explain your reasoning behind covering various body parts of your subjects - namely their heads and faces, but also in recent work, their hands as well?

As I said, it is very interesting to tell stories within portraits. I did that for a long time, but one day you ask yourself, what will be the next challenge? What else can I add to these stories? When you think about that, the next logical step will be to transform the portrait, to paint it in an abstract way. But the abstract in my portrait painting is not the transformation of color or shape, but the paper bag. I found out that for me this is a perfect medium to use in order to transform shape, to give it a message, or to simply hide the face itself. Sometimes less is more :)

You recently completed a new mural in Berlin, congratulations! How did that project come about? How often do you create larger, public works and do you enjoy it as much as your smaller pieces? 

It was Yasha, the director of the Urban Nation Museum of urban contemporary art in Berlin, who asked me to paint this specific wall. I just began working on a new series of drawings, which plays with red colored hands, that tell all those stories that hidden faces can’t tell. This series deals with people on the edge of society, the ones nobody listens to. And the wall I painted in Berlin is located in an area where these people live. So it was the perfect match.

Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

Image courtesy of Christian Böhmer.

What will you be showing at Moniker in New York? 

I will be showing this new series of people with red hands hidden behind their paper bag mask. But you need to see it in person!

Do you have any additional exciting projects going on in 2019 and beyond that you'd like to share?

Yes, I will have a huge solo show in Mainz, Germany in September. I’m very glad to be there because that is the place where I grew up and where I had my first graffiti writing experience. I have not been back there for more than 15 years!

I will also have a group show in October at 19Karen Gallery near Brisbane in Australia, which I’m also looking forward to. I love the idea that people from all over the world can have the opportunity to see my art in person.

Moniker will be held May 1 - 5 in New York City at:
718 Broadway
NoHo, Manhattan
New York City, NYC
10003

Learn more about Moniker Art Fair by visiting their website.

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Evoca1 Artist Feature | Moniker Art Fair
Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

We’re just a few short weeks away from Moniker Art Fair which will be held May 1-5, 2019 in New York City. The international fair’s 2019 exhibitors include some of the world’s most renowned urban & contemporary artists and galleries in booth exhibitions as well as solo presentations and installations. 28 exhibitors and four special projects, hailing from 13 countries around the globe, will present work in alignment with this year’s theme, Cause & Effect, which examines our shared roles and commitment to addressing the current state of political, social and ecological issues. Create! will be providing coverage of the fair, but we’re also excited to be bringing you a sneak peek at some of the artists who will be highlighted at this year’s NYC edition of Moniker. Last week we introduced you to WK Interact and this week we’re sharing the incredible work of Evoca1!

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Evoca1 was born in the Dominican Republic, where he spent most of his childhood drawing on walls and playing baseball, until eventually moving to Hollywood, Florida at age 11. 

As an autodidact, he has received his art education from the compulsive study of the old masters’ works and techniques. His pieces are a personal reflection of his life experiences, as well as observations of human behaviors and social struggles.

He currently lives and works out of South Florida, where he continues to develop his craft and research of figurative painting. In recent years, this mainly happened in public spaces where he has painted large-scale murals. His interaction with the local environments has been essential in generating the concept of his work.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

For more information about Moniker please visit their website and follow along with Evoca1 on Instagram.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

Image courtesy of Evoca1.

WK Interact Interview | Moniker Art Fair
art work WK .jpg

Create! Magazine is a proud partner of Moniker International Art Fair which will be held in May in New York City. Moniker shines a spotlight not only on young and emerging artists, but also on leaders in the urban and new contemporary art movement. For the forthcoming iteration of the fair, they will be highlighting one of NYC’s most recognized wheat pasting artist, WK Interact. Originally from France, WK Interact has been working in New York for over 20 years. Read our interview below to learn more about his work!

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Tell us about your background. Were you interested in art as a child or did you come to it later in life?

Well, I started to draw when I was 8 years old as my father was a painter. I think I became passionate about art from seeing him in his studio.

What brought you to New York?

I was first in New York when I was 13 years old, but did not have a chance to visit as I had only landed there for a connecting flight to Miami. I came back at age 16 in 1982 and it ended up having an incredible impact on me. My flight arrived late at night and I only knew the address of my hotel on 82nd street near Central Park. Of course, it was the cheapest place to stay and the worst hotel at $15 per night. I spent the next three months traveling all over the state using Greyhound buses and after this, I decided to focus on creating art ‘in motion’. At the age of 18, I came up with a process of making distorted images using a Xerox copy machine which helped me find my signature style. After placing many canvases in my hometown in the south of France illegally, it was obvious to me that the best city to create that sort of interaction with my work would be New York. I ended up living in the city for many years and became a french New Yorker. I’m still living there today!

How has living there affected your work?

Living in New York for me was important to just be there and connect with the city. For my work, I feel that it becomes part of an event or a corner of the street. Even I start to blend in with my work by wearing all black clothes.

Can you explain your interest in figures and your unique techniques to create your work?

My work is based on the following concept: First illustration, then the location, then the motion interacting with the scale of the building. My real motivation is film. I decide to use the street to recreate a story and take photos with people passing by. The interaction part of my concept and process is where I came up with the name WK INTERACT.

What are some of your inspirations?

Sculptors and photographers like Calder and William Klein as well as the film industry including French Connection, Blade Runner...and so many others.

What will you be exhibiting at Moniker?

I  will have one large work and 8 posters plus a large print directly installed on a wall.

Besides showing with Moniker, do you have any other projects this year you'd like to share?

Plenty of projects, but I can’t mention anything yet :)

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Moniker Art Fair has earned a reputation as one of the most exciting contemporary art fairs with it’s roots embedded in urban culture. Learn more by visiting their website or follow them on Instagram.

Moniker Art Fair | New York May 1-5, 2019
Tina Ziegler, Fair Director. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Tina Ziegler, Fair Director. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Create! Magazine is excited to be partnering with Moniker Art Fair for its 11th edition in New York this spring. Read on to learn more about what exciting things you can look forward to at this incredible contemporary art fair!

This May 1 - 5, Moniker Art Fair returns to New York, welcoming international and local collectors to a five-day celebration of New Contemporary Art in Manhattan.

Moniker Art Fair is an acclaimed contemporary art fair with urban influences, which has for 10 years delighted collectors and art lovers in both New York and London with hyper-curated, fully-immersive and broad-scope events.

The next edition, held 1 - 5 May 2019, will dominate the heart of the New York art scene in its 15,000 square-foot venue in NoHo, continuing the never-conventional, always-pioneering fair format that has launched the careers of numerous artists in the past decades in partnership with international galleries.

Moniker has become the go-to for art collectors to learn more about the contemporary art world and to buy art assured by the curation, instinct and advice of professionals.

Moniker London 2018. Photo credit: Sam Roberts.

Moniker London 2018. Photo credit: Sam Roberts.

NEW YORK EXHIBITORS LIST

INTERNATIONAL GALLERIES

GAREY THE THIRD | LA & Hong Kong

FIERCELY CURIOUS | Brooklyn

MAZEL GALERIE | Brussels & Singapore

FOUSION GALLERY | Barcelona

VINYL ON VINYL | The Philippines

ROMAN FINE ART | The Hamptons

CAKE AGENCY | Chicago, Illonois 

11.12 GALLERY | Moscow, Russia

LIVING ART GLOBAL | UK

ANALOG CONTEMPORARY | Philadelphia

PERSEUS GALLERY | New York

 

OPEN STUDIOS

SIRIS HILL | UK

FATHERLESS | Illinois

DEREK GORES | Florida

BURAK KARAVIT | Istanbul

NICK FEDAEFF | Russia

ARTHUR BECKER | New York

TXEMY & AMAIA ARRAZOLA | New York

 

SPOTLIGHT ARTISTS

EVOCA 1 | Dominican Republic

CHRISTIAN BOEHMER | Cologne

WK INTERACT | New York

ICY & SOT | Iran

YOK & SHERYO | The Philippines

ARINZE STANLEY | Nigeria

NUNO VIEGAS | Portugal

Photo credit: Icy & Sot. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Photo credit: Icy & Sot. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

FAIR SCHEDULE 2019

Wednesday 1 May 2019
Collectors Day: 3pm-7pm 
VIP Celebration: 7pm - 10pm
$75 (Includes $50 towards your first original artwork purchase)

A program of educational talks, panel discussions and networking sessions
around collecting contemporary and urban art.

Thursday 2 May 2019 
Public Opening | 1pm - 5pm 
Opening Celebration | 5pm - 9:30pm 
$25

General Fair Days
Friday 3 May | 1 - 10pm 
Saturday 4 May | 12 - 8pm 
Sunday 5 May | 11am- 6pm 
$15

STUDENTS AND SENIORS

Students can visit Moniker free of charge. A valid student ID will be required before entry.

Seniors (65+) ticket price is $10 (+booking fee) with code: REDUCED.

FAIR ACCESS

Children under the age of 16 do not need a ticket to visit the fair.

Well behaved leashed pets are welcome on site.



For more information, please visit their website: https://www.monikerartfair.com/ or follow them on Instagram.

Photo credit: WK Interact. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Photo credit: WK Interact. Photo courtesy of Moniker Art Fair.

Pulse & Scope Recap 2018
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We were so thrilled to be able to have the chance to see more fairs than usual this year. While we loved the diversity of artists represented at each of the shows that we visited, we have to give a special shoutout to Pulse and Scope for having consistent programs of top quality galleries and artists. As we walked along the aisles at both fairs, we couldn’t help but be pulled in every direction trying to take in as much of it as possible. We certainly tried to - so here are a few of our favorites!

PULSE

Andy Dixon  Toilette of Venus , 2018 Acrylic and oil pastel on canvas 59 x 47 inches Joshua Liner Gallery

Andy Dixon
Toilette of Venus, 2018
Acrylic and oil pastel on canvas
59 x 47 inches
Joshua Liner Gallery

Amy Lincoln  Sprinkler , 2018 Acrylic on panel 24 × 36 inches Project: ARTspace

Amy Lincoln
Sprinkler, 2018
Acrylic on panel
24 × 36 inches
Project: ARTspace

Kate Ballis  Lenticular II , 2017 Archival Pigment Print 39 x 59 inches Garis & Hahn

Kate Ballis
Lenticular II, 2017
Archival Pigment Print
39 x 59 inches
Garis & Hahn

Agostino Iacurci  Bust n°6 , 2018 Acrylic on canvas 59 1/10 × 39 2/5 × 1 3/5 inches M77 Gallery

Agostino Iacurci
Bust n°6, 2018
Acrylic on canvas
59 1/10 × 39 2/5 × 1 3/5 inches
M77 Gallery

Daisy Patton  Untitled (Mischievous Couple) , 2018 Oil on archival print mounted to panel 80 × 60 inches K Contemporary

Daisy Patton
Untitled (Mischievous Couple), 2018
Oil on archival print mounted to panel
80 × 60 inches
K Contemporary

Bisa Butler  The Safety Patrol , 2018 Quilted and appliquéd cotton, wool and chiffon 82 × 90 inches Claire Oliver Gallery

Bisa Butler
The Safety Patrol, 2018
Quilted and appliquéd cotton, wool and chiffon
82 × 90 inches
Claire Oliver Gallery

Daniel Handal  Java Rice Finch (Bubble Gum) , 2016 Signed, titled, dated, and numbered on label, verso Archival pigment print, painted frame (Edition of 3 + 2 APs) 19 x 15 inches Clamp Art

Daniel Handal
Java Rice Finch (Bubble Gum), 2016
Signed, titled, dated, and numbered on label, verso
Archival pigment print, painted frame (Edition of 3 + 2 APs)
19 x 15 inches
Clamp Art

Martina Lang  The Object 01 , 2017 Digital c-print 35 × 24 × 1 22/25 inches Uprise Art

Martina Lang
The Object 01, 2017
Digital c-print
35 × 24 × 1 22/25 inches
Uprise Art

 

SCOPE

Max Sansing  Stranded on Stony Island , 2018 Oil, Acrylic & Spray Paint 30 x 40 inches Line Dot editions

Max Sansing
Stranded on Stony Island, 2018
Oil, Acrylic & Spray Paint
30 x 40 inches
Line Dot editions

Fahren Feingold   WASTED MOMENTS , 2017 Watercolor 12 × 9 inches The Untitled Space

Fahren Feingold
WASTED MOMENTS, 2017
Watercolor
12 × 9 inches
The Untitled Space

Nathan Wong   NW 28 , 2018 Acrylic on canvas 72 × 60 × 1 inches Joseph Gross Gallery

Nathan Wong
NW 28, 2018
Acrylic on canvas
72 × 60 × 1 inches
Joseph Gross Gallery

Betsy Enzensberger   Glittery Rose Gold Popsicle , 2018 Resin, ink, glitter & plexi 26 × 14 × 14 inches

Betsy Enzensberger
Glittery Rose Gold Popsicle, 2018
Resin, ink, glitter & plexi
26 × 14 × 14 inches

Hélène Cenedese   Beard man #6 , 2018 Oil stick, acrylic on canvas 72 × 60 inches Galerie C.O.A.

Hélène Cenedese
Beard man #6, 2018
Oil stick, acrylic on canvas
72 × 60 inches
Galerie C.O.A.

Ulla-Stina Wikander   Just Call! , 2018 Cross stitch on found object, mixed media 5 9/10 × 7 9/10 × 7 9/10 inches Paradigm Gallery + Studio

Ulla-Stina Wikander
Just Call!, 2018
Cross stitch on found object, mixed media
5 9/10 × 7 9/10 × 7 9/10 inches
Paradigm Gallery + Studio

Gigi Mills   Laundry/Hanging Sheets with A Long Legged Dog , 2018 Oil on linen 20 × 17 inches Emmanuelle G Gallery

Gigi Mills
Laundry/Hanging Sheets with A Long Legged Dog, 2018
Oil on linen
20 × 17 inches
Emmanuelle G Gallery

10 Highlights From EXPO Chicago

Although I am originally from the midwest, this year’s EXPO Chicago was my first time attending the international art fair. Having lived elsewhere for the past several years, and having visited a variety of different art fairs and festivals while doing so, I was anxious to see what EXPO had to offer. I can gladly say that it did not disappoint. Not only did the fair showcase an incredibly talented and unique roster of artists, it also featured a plethora of thought-provoking and dynamic programming, which included panel discussions on essential topics in curating, and an interview marathon hosted by world renowned curator Hans-Ulrich Obrist. Although, I was completely wowed and mesmerized by the artwork around every corner, I’ve come up with a list of galleries whose featured artwork was truly unforgettable. Here are my top ten gallery booth highlights from EXPO Chicago. And if you are able, be sure to visit these galleries in person…I know I will!

1. Shulamit Nazarian

Shulamit Nazarian gallery’s booth was an absolute showstopper. I still remember spotting this work from across the fair and making my way over to get a better look at these incredible paintings. I spent so much time looking at these vivid works by Amir H. Fallah, who Shulamit Nazarian represents, and could not believe the vibrancy in the colors and the intricate patterns within each painting. Check out the gallery’s website to see more of Fallah’s work, which also includes installations. And next time you are in L.A., be sure to stop by this gallery!

2. Richard Heller Gallery

Having been a huge fan of Christian Rex van Minnen’s work for some time now, to say I was excited to see his work in person is an understatement. His painting Let’s Step Outside is even more impressive in person. The artist’s skill and attention to detail is almost unbelievable, as his subjects look as if they are three-dimensional. The work will certainly leave you in awe, not knowing quite what you are looking at when seeing his fleshy, gummy-like creations. Other works featured at Richard Heller Gallery’s booth also caught my eye, which included the work of Amy Bennet, Ryan Travis Christian, Neil Farber, Farshad Farzankia, Kajahl, Tony Marsh, Joakim Ojanen, Alina Perez, Paco Pomet, Ryan Schneider, Devin Troy Strother, Orkideh Torabi, and Mark Whalen.

3. October Gallery

London based October Gallery definitely brought their ‘A’ game to Chicago. Their booth featured the work of two essential African artists Eddy Kamuanga Ilunga and El Anatsu. Both of the artists’ works are powerful and monumental, and proved to be even more so when shown together. I was particularly moved by the palpable emotion found in Ilunga’s painting Fragile 9, and I could not take my eyes off of the constellation-like patterns on his subject’s skin. October Gallery’s selection of artists showcased truly embodied an international aesthetic, as they state that they aim to promote “the Transvangarde, the very best in contemporary art from around the planet.”

4. Library Street Collective

Library Street Collective’s booth provided a breath of fresh air with a unique aesthetic straight out of of Detroit. Bright, saturated colors and neon lights contributed to a stand-out selection of artwork that filled the space with eager viewers. The pop-art-esque sculpture titled Greedy Nero by Adam Parker Smith was just one of many amazing works that was featured at EXPO Chicago as an extension of the exhibition Coping Mechanisms, hosted at their permanent space in Detroit, curated by Sara Nickleson.

5. Night Gallery

One of my favorite elements of EXPO Chicago was their EXPOSURE section, which showcased solo and two-artist displays hosted by younger galleries. This provided a change of pace, allowing me to slow down and really examine a larger collection of an artist’s work, rather than just one or two pieces. In this section, Night Gallery’s display of photography by artist Awol Erizku stuck out in the crowd. The booth was a color-lovers dream, as the walls were painted the same orange featured in the photography as well as the frames. The contrast between this orange hue and the subjects of Erizku’s work was beautiful and striking. Make sure to check out this Los Angeles-based gallery in person, as they have more work available by the artist.

6. The Hole NYC

The Hole, NYC represents an impressive roster of artists, many of which were showcased at their booth at EXPO Chicago. Featured artists included Alex Gardner, Eric Shaw, Holton Rower, Joe Reihsen, Jonathan Chapline, Johnny Abrahams, Matthew Stone, Morgan Blair, Robert Moreland, Royal Jarmon, and Adam Parker Smith. Each piece ranged in style and content, while still managing to be incredibly cohesive without any piece becoming lost or overlooked. One particular highlight for me in this booth was the work of Jonathan Chapline, whose psychedelic colors and bold lines create unforgettable compositions. Make sure to check out The Hole next time you are in NYC, as they also host performances and other artist-centric programming.

7. Nancy Hoffman Gallery

At Nancy Hoffman Gallery’s booth, I found myself absorbed in the large-scale, unique paintings of Peter Plagens, which was juxtaposed with the sculptural work of Jesse Small, among others. Although the artists’ works are very different from one another, the contrast complimented both bodies of work beautifully. What added to my experience at this booth was the welcoming environment from a knowledgable staff and the additional information provided about the artists. I always enjoy a good wall text— and on the gallery’s website, they describe Peter Plagen’s paintings as “a quirky personal expression, on which his characteristic clumsy/pretty configurations comport themselves.” Learning more about the artist’s practice can really enhance your experience when viewing their work!

8. Galerie Division

With locations in both Toronto and Montreal, Galerie Division showcased just about every kind of artwork you could think of, including painting, sculpture, installation, and digital animation. The digital animation titled CG Family of artist Alex Mcleod was absolutely mesmerizing, as shapes of liquid gold melted and changed form on screen, dancing and flowing. The paintings of Chloe Wise were also a stand-out within the selection of work Galerie Division featured.

9. Richard Gray Gallery

A staple in the Chicago art scene, Richard Gray Gallery showcased a staggering collection of contemporary and modern art, making it a must-see booth at EXPO Chicago. Artwork included that of seminal artists Alex Katz and Jim Dine, as well as the infamous surrealist Rene Magritte. Richard Gray Gallery also featured local and historically important artist Theaster Gates. As their collection proved to already attract crowds, the sculpture Laura Asia in White by Jaume Plensa became a star of the EXPO, as so many could not keep their eyes off of the optical-illusion created in the clever perspective of the piece. 

10. BEERS London

BEERS Gallery completely transformed their booth into a dynamic and colorful installation that covered every inch of the space with graphic shapes. Instead of a white cube, this booth immersed the viewers in an abstract world created by St. Louis-based artist William Lachance. The installation featured elements that came off of the wall, such as basketball goal, with accompanying basketballs on either side of the gallery (painted to match the walls, of course.) This being their first time at EXPO Chicago, BEERS Gallery certainly left their mark.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Vivian Horan Fine Art

Vivian Horan

Owner of Vivian Horan Fine Art

35 East 67th Street

New York, NY 10065

info@vivianhoran.com

Mel Bochner, Blah, Blah, Blah, 2013, Monoprint with collage, engraving, and embossment on hand-dyed Twinrocker handmade paper, 11 7/8 x 10 inches, 30.2 x 25.4 cm, Signed and dated on right recto in graphite

Mel Bochner, Blah, Blah, Blah, 2013, Monoprint with collage, engraving, and embossment on hand-dyed Twinrocker handmade paper, 11 7/8 x 10 inches, 30.2 x 25.4 cm, Signed and dated on right recto in graphite

What is the gallery's focus at this year's fair?

This year, we will be focusing on emerging and mid – career contemporary artists from across the world.

Are there specific artists or works that collectors should pay attention to at your booth?  

We are very excited to be bringing a Nick Cave Sound Suit, a Jenny Holzer Led sign from the Survival Series, Blah, Blah, Blah by Mel Bochner, and work by the Light and Space Californian, Peter Alexander. Further, we are bringing the work of Paul O’Connor, an artist from Taos, New Mexico, who has an amazing understanding of metals and their alchemic effects. Paul will be included in our spring gallery show featuring Taos artists.

Rob Wynne,   Over the Rainbow , 2010, Poured and mirrored glass in 15 parts, 45 x 55 inches 114.3 x 139.7 cm, Signed and dated on verso of the last letter ‘W'

Rob Wynne, Over the Rainbow, 2010, Poured and mirrored glass in 15 parts, 45 x 55 inches 114.3 x 139.7 cm, Signed and dated on verso of the last letter ‘W'

What are some of your favorite aspects of being a part of Art Miami?

As this is our first year at Art Miami, we are excited to see what it brings – and thrilled to go from spectator to participant.

Please give our readers a few tips for making the most of attending art fairs based on your experience. 

1)   Visit Art Miami first! We would hate for you to miss the great works before they are gone.

2)   Take your time, and do not do too much. It is very easy to become overwhelmed, causing works to blur.

Paradigm Gallery: Scott Albrecht at Scope Miami Beach

Scott Albrecht was born in 1983 in New Brunswick, NJ, and raised in Bethlehem Township, NJ. In 2003, he received a degree in Graphic Design from The Art Institute of Philadelphia. Scott is currently based in Brooklyn, NY and a member of The Gowanus Studio Space. His work incorporates elements of woodworking, hand-drawn typography, geometric collage using vintage printed ephemera and found objects and has been published and exhibited both domestically and internationally.  

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What inspired your recent work?

A large part of my work is directly inspired by daily experiences or relationships that I have and I wind up using my work as a way to get a deeper understanding of what’s happening. I think this past year I’ve been influenced by a lot of situations that overlap on one another, and I’m more and more trying to understand my relationships and take stock in what is important. 

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How do you come up with the geometry and color palette in each piece?

All the works in this collection, in one way or another, stem from abstracted typography, so the base of each piece builds up from an underlying message. Since the words themselves are abstracted, the color palettes do a lot of the initial work in terms of setting the mood and tone of a piece. I spend a lot of time trying to think about how that idea can be translated with color.

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Tell us about the work that will be on display at Scope during this year’s Art Basel Week in Miami. What is this year's focus?

I’ll have a collection of new woodworks on view with Paradigm Gallery that are stemming from a few different series’ that I’ve been working on and evolving. Each work is comprised of several dozen (if not 100+) individually cut pieces of wood that are then sanded, painted and re-assembled.

Conceptually a bigger theme for me this past year has been the idea of acceptance and understanding and learning to embrace a situation as-is. I think the works in the collection that I have been meditating on the most are a triptych stemming from the Wabi Sabi philosophy that all things are imperfect, incomplete and impermanent.

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What is a day in a life like for you? How do you find a balance between your studio practice and other commitments?

Each day varies depending on what I’m working on or what my focus is, but I try to keep a pretty large pool of projects and pieces going that I can work on so that if I get burned out or just need to switch gears I can do that and come back to whatever it is with a fresh perspective. One day I might be in the wood shop working on some pieces, the next I might be getting proposals together or making a zine… it really varies day-to-day and I like that flexibility to keep the days from being monotonous. In terms of other commitments, I’ve learned that giving myself a set schedule in the studio is really important. I generally work from 10-7 and having that cut-off forces me to really focus on what I need to get done that day, otherwise I’ll totally just work all day and all night.

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What is an important element in your work that you want viewers to be aware of?

I don’t know that I want viewers to be aware of anything in particular. Because the work is more abstract, there’s something really nice in that someone may see something that I may not see, or that they can form their own relationship to a piece.

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Share a piece of advice with other artists that helped you along the way.

Always keep going. The harder you work, the better luck you have.

Also don’t compare yourself to other people. Everyone is at a different time and place in their journey.