Posts in Art Fairs
Art New York 2018: Interview With Casterline|Goodman Gallery

Casterline|Goodman Gallery

Gallery Owners Robert Casterline and Jordan Goodman

http://www.casterlinegoodman.com

611 E. Cooper Avenue Aspen, CO 81611

Jim DINE  Still-Start The Western Fire, 2010  Acrylic, charcoal and sand on linen  72 1/8 x 60 1/4 inches

Jim DINE

Still-Start The Western Fire, 2010

Acrylic, charcoal and sand on linen

72 1/8 x 60 1/4 inches

Tell us a little bit about your gallery. What types of art do you generally focus on?

Specializing in Post-War and Contemporary art, Casterline|Goodman Gallery is committed to presenting first-tier, investment-grade original artwork from the 20th and 21st centuries.

What should visitors expect from your booth in Art New York this year?

Unique paintings and drawings by established artists such as Jim Dine, Alex Katz, Gerhard Richter, Ed Ruscha and Richard Serra.

Please share a few tips for new collectors and those interested in investing in art for the first time. 

I recommend that new collectors take their time to learn about the artists they are drawn to and the art market in general before making a purchase.  I would recommend that if they’re investing, they need to deal with a gallery that actually handles investment artwork instead of an advisor or primary gallery that may or may not be a specialist.

Ed RUSCHA  Yes Tree, 1983-1986  Oil and enamel on canvas  50 x 40 inches

Ed RUSCHA

Yes Tree, 1983-1986

Oil and enamel on canvas

50 x 40 inches

What are your favorite aspects of participating in art fairs?

We love the opportunity to meet so many new people that share our passion for the artists that we focus on, in a city where we don’t have a gallery presence. 

Richard SERRA  P&E VIII, 2007  Paintstick on mylar  26 1/2 x 40 inches

Richard SERRA

P&E VIII, 2007

Paintstick on mylar

26 1/2 x 40 inches

Name a few important works we should keep an eye on when visiting. 

Our Richard Serra collection is pretty amazing, along with great works by Ed Ruscha. 

(Above image: Richard SERRA, P&E IX, 2007, Litho crayon on mylar, 26 1/2 x 40 inches)

Art New York 2018: Interview With Archeus/ Post-Modern

ARCHEUS / POST-MODERN 

Director Brian Balfour–Oatts

www.archeus.com

(Donald Judd, Untitled)

(Donald Judd, Untitled)

 

Tell us a little bit about your gallery. What types of art do you generally focus on?

We deal in works from the so-called "secondary market", which means pieces which are already in the marketplace, and not being sold on behalf of the artist. The artists in whose work we deal are all very established, in museum collections, and are generally held to be amongst the best and most well-known of their generation

What should visitors expect from your booth in Art New York this year?

Predominantly important abstract work. We have some very fine examples of paintings by Pierre Soulages, Josef Albers and Ron Gorchov, and rare editions by Donald Judd and Bridget Riley. The majority of artists that we hold are abstract, both gestural and hard-edged - although we are also very involved with the figurative work of Hockney, Freud, Warhol and Ed Ruscha.

Please share a few tips for new collectors and those interested in investing in art for the first time.

If an artist isn't already in the collection of MoMA or the Tate, then don't even think about the investment angle. Check recent acquisitions by both of those institutions, as well as other international museums (usually available online) and see what they have bought in the last year.

If you consider your purchase of art to be an investment, then it's fine to buy with your ears. Unless you have been looking at paintings every day for ten years, ask and listen.

What are your favorite aspects of participating in art fairs?

The non-stop nature of the four or five days of an art fair is very exciting. Every minute a different conversation begins, and you speak to hundreds of people in a very short space of time.  One way or another, the majority of my most important and favorite clients have met me through art fairs.

Name a few important works we should keep an eye on when visiting. 

We have a super-rare set of ten black woodcuts by Donald Judd, the only set ever to have appeared on the market, other examples of which are owned by MoMA and SFMoMA. 

We also have a beautiful Albers painting which belongs to the same group that was the subject of the Guggenheim's recent "Albers in Mexico" exhibition. 

Genuinely museum quality works are a joy to own, even if it is temporary. 

(Above image: Josef Albers, Contented Green)

Art New York 2018: Interview With David Benrimon Fine Art

David Benrimon Fine Art

The Crown Building   

730 Fifth Avenue, 7th Floor 

New York, New York 10019

www.benrimon.com

Mel BOCHNER, Amazing, 2016, Monoprint with collage, engraving and embossment on paper, 30 x 22 in

Mel BOCHNER, Amazing, 2016, Monoprint with collage, engraving and embossment on paper, 30 x 22 in

Tell us a little bit about your gallery. What types of art do you generally focus on?

David Benrimon Fine Art specializes in Modern and Contemporary art, focusing on works that range from Modern masters paintings to Contemporary paintings, sculptures and editions.

Roy LICHTENSTEIN,  Water Lilies with Cloud  (C. 263), 1992, Screenprint enamel on processed and swirled stainless steel, 65.5 x 44.75 in

Roy LICHTENSTEIN, Water Lilies with Cloud (C. 263), 1992, Screenprint enamel on processed and swirled stainless steel, 65.5 x 44.75 in

What should visitors expect from your booth in Art New York this year?

DBFA’s Art New York booth will exhibit artworks in a variety of different mediums, such as editions, sculptures and original paintings. There will be something for every collector at our curated booth.

Please share a few tips for new collectors and those interested in investing in art for the first time. 

Our greatest advice is to always be an educated buyer! Learn about the artist and their practice, and always examine the condition of an artwork. Also, collect and surround yourself with artwork that you love and speaks to you.

Robert INDIANA,  LOVE (red/gold) , 1996-2002, Polychrome aluminum, 18 x 18 x 9 inches

Robert INDIANA, LOVE (red/gold), 1996-2002, Polychrome aluminum, 18 x 18 x 9 inches

What are your favorite aspects of participating in art fairs?

A paramount aspect of participating in art fairs is meeting collectors from near and far. We especially appreciate New York fairs, as the high representation of local collectors enables us to create relationships with dealers, buyers, and art lovers in the region.

Name a few important works we should keep an eye on when visiting. 

Yayoi Kusama and George Condo are super hot in the current art market, and visitors can look forward to seeing signature and compelling works by both artists at our booth.

(Above image by Yayoi Kusama)

Art New York 2018: Interview With Long-Sharp Gallery 

Long-Sharp Gallery

Gallery Owner Rhonda Long-Sharp

http://www.longsharpgallery.com/

1 North Illinois, Suite A, Indianapolis, IN 46204

(Above image: Tarik Currimbhoy, Stainless Steel Rocker [Kinetic])

Gino Miles,  Elegance

Gino Miles, Elegance

Tell us a little bit about your gallery. What types of art do you generally focus on?

Long-Sharp Gallery (LSG) has locations in Indianapolis and New York City. LSG specializes in works on paper, multiples and drawings by modern masters including: Picasso, Miro, Warhol, Basquiat, Haring, Indiana, and Lichtenstein. In addition, LSG is dedicated to a contemporary program that incorporates paintings, photography, and sculpture, as well as conceptual and multimedia art by a growing roster of regional, national, and international artists. This roster includes Gino Miles, Thalen & Thalen, David Spiller, Russell Young, and Amy Kirchner, among others.  

LSG has placed works in important museums, corporations, and in public and private collections. Recently named one of the top 500 Art Galleries in the world by Modern Painters Magazine (Blouin Art Info), LSG is honored to work with clients worldwide.

Long-Sharp Gallery features a rigorous program which includes international contemporary artists in solo and thematic exhibitions. The gallery also enjoys increased participation in top level art fairs in the US and Europe, which affords the gallery's worldwide clients even greater access to the gallery’s growing inventory of important and innovative works. These art fairs include Masterpiece London and Art Miami. 

Long-Sharp Gallery is a certified Woman's Business Enterprise (WBE) and a member of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO).

Andy Warhol,  Key Service

Andy Warhol, Key Service

What should visitors expect from your booth in Art New York this year?

Focusing on “small masterpieces”, Long-Sharp Gallery returns to Art New York 2018 with a selection of important works [no greater in size than 24” x 24”] by modern and contemporary masters. The centerpiece of the exhibition is Pablo Picasso’s watercolor and charcoal drawing, titled “Femme”; the piece is from 1901 – the year of Picasso’s first solo exhibition in Paris. Small works on canvas by Andy Warhol, Sam Francis, and Robert Indiana, along with a color pencil study drawing by Roy Lichtenstein, will be presented alongside Picasso’s “Femme”.  Works by contemporary sculptors Gino Miles, Tarik Currimbhoy, Thalen & Thalen, and David Hayes will flank the “small masterpieces.” 

   Gino Miles,  Wild

 

Gino Miles, Wild

Please share a few tips for new collectors and those interested in investing in art for the first time.  

1. Only buy art that rocks your world. If you don’t love it, don’t buy it. Visit top tier galleries and fine art fairs to learn what you like.

2. Look for a gallery or auction house that can assist you. Vet them for their reputation, ethics, and clientele. For works by top tier artists such as Picasso, Warhol, etc., vet the gallery or auction house and the work carefully, examine the catalogue raisonné pertinent to the artist, look at the front and back of each work, and generally do your homework. Most auction houses warrant authenticity for only 5 years after purchase.

3. Understand that condition is important to value.  That is, two works from the same limited edition may be vastly different in price because of the condition of those works. Simply doing price comparisons is not the way to buy art. Price should be the third criteria on the list.

What are your favorite aspects of participating in art fairs?

Art fairs are a favorite of our gallery because we get to see artwork brought from galleries all over the world.  The Art Miami Group brings interesting and diverse galleries to its fairs.  We also like the connoisseurship of highly vetted secondary market fairs (such as Masterpiece London).

Name a few important works we should keep an eye on when visiting. 
Our exhibit this year is dedicated to important works with a small footprint. Picasso’s “Femme”, the watercolor and charcoal drawing from 1901, is certainly a standout piece.  We are also excited to exhibit a new sculpture by Gino Miles titled “Elegance.”

Art New York 2018: Interview With Wexler Gallery

www.wexlergallery.com

201 North 3rd
Street, Philadelphia PA 19106

Interview with Associate Director Victoria Rosenberger

GREGORY NANGLE  Ripple Rorschach Chair, 2018  Low polish cast bronze  24 x 20 x 38 in (seat height: 19 in)

GREGORY NANGLE

Ripple Rorschach Chair, 2018

Low polish cast bronze

24 x 20 x 38 in (seat height: 19 in)

Tell us a little bit about your gallery. What types of art do you generally focus on?

Challenging the traditional labels that categorize art, Wexler Gallery exhibits work that coexists in the expressive realms of design, fine art and contemporary glass and ceramics. Questioning and testing the boundaries of these fields, Wexler Gallery aims to present functional and non-functional work that consistently celebrates innovation as much as aesthetic beauty.

Wexler Gallery opened in 2000 in the historic district of Old City, Philadelphia. Since then, the gallery has proudly showcased extraordinary work by both master artists and the emerging talent of today. 

ROBERTO LUGO  Colin and a Queen, 2018  Terra cotta, china paint, luster  11 x 6.5 x 17 in

ROBERTO LUGO

Colin and a Queen, 2018

Terra cotta, china paint, luster

11 x 6.5 x 17 in

What should visitors expect from your booth in Art New York this year?

Wexler Gallery will be showing some exceptional original paintings by Andy Warhol, Sam Francis and Richard Hambleton, a beautiful Louise Nevelson wall sculpture and new work by three of our stand-out gallery artists Roberto Lugo, Gregory Nangle and Eric Slayton.

GREGORY NANGLE  Cosmos (Ghost mirror installation), 2018  Glass, tin, silver, lacquer, bronze  34 x 21 x 2.75 in (each)

GREGORY NANGLE

Cosmos (Ghost mirror installation), 2018

Glass, tin, silver, lacquer, bronze

34 x 21 x 2.75 in (each)

Please share a few tips for new collectors and those interested in investing in art for the first time. 

Considering art as an investment can be a smart and extremely profitable, but I always shy away from making that the most important part of the puzzle when fitting a collector with a piece of work. They have to love it and have a visceral connection to it first and foremost. It is what the artist intended, and it is what completes the lifecycle of a piece of art. There is something so rewarding about making that match and finding a forever home for a piece of art with collectors who will cherish it as if it were created only for them. If it also happens to be a great investment down the road, that is just the icing on the cake.

What are your favorite aspects of participating in art fairs?

I love meeting all of the different people that attend art fairs. Talking shop with artists, collectors, art scholars is always a fun way to spend the afternoon, but I find that those who come with no art-related background or knowledge at all often have the most interesting perceptions and perspectives when looking at, discussing and reacting to the art around them. It is a refreshing way to continuously open my own eyes to the ever-changing art world and those in and around it. 

ERIC SLAYTON  Gravity Bench, 2018  Blackened and waxed steel plate  90.5 x 11 x 14.5 in

ERIC SLAYTON

Gravity Bench, 2018

Blackened and waxed steel plate

90.5 x 11 x 14.5 in

Name a few important works we should keep an eye on when visiting. 

Wexler Gallery is exceptionally proud of the new work that we will be showing by stand-out gallery artists Roberto Lugo, Gregory Nangle and Eric Slayton. These three young men are each making very different work but are all equally pushing art boundaries and making their mark on art – what it means, how it is used and why we need it as a society.

Our Picks for Spring/Break Art Show 2018

SPRING/BREAK Art Show is an internationally recognized exhibition platform using underused, atypical and historic New York City exhibition spaces to activate and challenge the traditional cultural landscape of the art market, typically but not exclusively during Armory Arts Week. 

While there was a ton of incredible and innovative work, we picked the following projects that inspired us during our visit to the show. Be sure to check our the exhibition to see tons more art!

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Vivian Horan Fine Art

Vivian Horan

Owner of Vivian Horan Fine Art

35 East 67th Street

New York, NY 10065

info@vivianhoran.com

Mel Bochner, Blah, Blah, Blah, 2013, Monoprint with collage, engraving, and embossment on hand-dyed Twinrocker handmade paper, 11 7/8 x 10 inches, 30.2 x 25.4 cm, Signed and dated on right recto in graphite

Mel Bochner, Blah, Blah, Blah, 2013, Monoprint with collage, engraving, and embossment on hand-dyed Twinrocker handmade paper, 11 7/8 x 10 inches, 30.2 x 25.4 cm, Signed and dated on right recto in graphite

What is the gallery's focus at this year's fair?

This year, we will be focusing on emerging and mid – career contemporary artists from across the world.

Are there specific artists or works that collectors should pay attention to at your booth?  

We are very excited to be bringing a Nick Cave Sound Suit, a Jenny Holzer Led sign from the Survival Series, Blah, Blah, Blah by Mel Bochner, and work by the Light and Space Californian, Peter Alexander. Further, we are bringing the work of Paul O’Connor, an artist from Taos, New Mexico, who has an amazing understanding of metals and their alchemic effects. Paul will be included in our spring gallery show featuring Taos artists.

Rob Wynne,   Over the Rainbow , 2010, Poured and mirrored glass in 15 parts, 45 x 55 inches 114.3 x 139.7 cm, Signed and dated on verso of the last letter ‘W'

Rob Wynne, Over the Rainbow, 2010, Poured and mirrored glass in 15 parts, 45 x 55 inches 114.3 x 139.7 cm, Signed and dated on verso of the last letter ‘W'

What are some of your favorite aspects of being a part of Art Miami?

As this is our first year at Art Miami, we are excited to see what it brings – and thrilled to go from spectator to participant.

Please give our readers a few tips for making the most of attending art fairs based on your experience. 

1)   Visit Art Miami first! We would hate for you to miss the great works before they are gone.

2)   Take your time, and do not do too much. It is very easy to become overwhelmed, causing works to blur.

Paradigm Gallery: Scott Albrecht at Scope Miami Beach

Scott Albrecht was born in 1983 in New Brunswick, NJ, and raised in Bethlehem Township, NJ. In 2003, he received a degree in Graphic Design from The Art Institute of Philadelphia. Scott is currently based in Brooklyn, NY and a member of The Gowanus Studio Space. His work incorporates elements of woodworking, hand-drawn typography, geometric collage using vintage printed ephemera and found objects and has been published and exhibited both domestically and internationally.  

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What inspired your recent work?

A large part of my work is directly inspired by daily experiences or relationships that I have and I wind up using my work as a way to get a deeper understanding of what’s happening. I think this past year I’ve been influenced by a lot of situations that overlap on one another, and I’m more and more trying to understand my relationships and take stock in what is important. 

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How do you come up with the geometry and color palette in each piece?

All the works in this collection, in one way or another, stem from abstracted typography, so the base of each piece builds up from an underlying message. Since the words themselves are abstracted, the color palettes do a lot of the initial work in terms of setting the mood and tone of a piece. I spend a lot of time trying to think about how that idea can be translated with color.

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Tell us about the work that will be on display at Scope during this year’s Art Basel Week in Miami. What is this year's focus?

I’ll have a collection of new woodworks on view with Paradigm Gallery that are stemming from a few different series’ that I’ve been working on and evolving. Each work is comprised of several dozen (if not 100+) individually cut pieces of wood that are then sanded, painted and re-assembled.

Conceptually a bigger theme for me this past year has been the idea of acceptance and understanding and learning to embrace a situation as-is. I think the works in the collection that I have been meditating on the most are a triptych stemming from the Wabi Sabi philosophy that all things are imperfect, incomplete and impermanent.

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What is a day in a life like for you? How do you find a balance between your studio practice and other commitments?

Each day varies depending on what I’m working on or what my focus is, but I try to keep a pretty large pool of projects and pieces going that I can work on so that if I get burned out or just need to switch gears I can do that and come back to whatever it is with a fresh perspective. One day I might be in the wood shop working on some pieces, the next I might be getting proposals together or making a zine… it really varies day-to-day and I like that flexibility to keep the days from being monotonous. In terms of other commitments, I’ve learned that giving myself a set schedule in the studio is really important. I generally work from 10-7 and having that cut-off forces me to really focus on what I need to get done that day, otherwise I’ll totally just work all day and all night.

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What is an important element in your work that you want viewers to be aware of?

I don’t know that I want viewers to be aware of anything in particular. Because the work is more abstract, there’s something really nice in that someone may see something that I may not see, or that they can form their own relationship to a piece.

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Share a piece of advice with other artists that helped you along the way.

Always keep going. The harder you work, the better luck you have.

Also don’t compare yourself to other people. Everyone is at a different time and place in their journey.

Paradigm Gallery: Luke O’Sullivan at Scope Miami Beach

Luke O’Sullivan was born in 1984 in Boston, MA. He received his MFA in Printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2009 and a BFA from The Art Institute of Boston in 2006. He has exhibited in solo and group shows in Massachusetts, Maine, Rhode Island, New York, LA, Miami, and Philadelphia. He currently lives and works in Philadelphia, PA.

Statement

I create architecturally inspired sculptures and prints. Screen printed drawings are used to assemble two and three-dimensional works focused on undiscovered places beneath cities and landscapes. Early interests in Nintendo games, maps, and science fiction movies contribute to the playful nature of my art. I like to describe my process as creating a lego set using my own hand drawn pieces. I use those pieces to create elaborate sculptures of cities, labyrinths and fantastical objects. Exploration and adventure are central to everything I make with each drawing and sculpture contributing to an ongoing catalogue of a strange invented world. 

For more information contact Paradigm Gallery or visit their booth at Scope December 5-10, 2017. 

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Tell us about your early interests and how they influenced your current pieces. 

Exploration, discovery and adventure are the driving force behind what I do. There is a playful nature to my work rooted in my early interests in Nintendo games, maps, and science fiction movies. I often describe my process as creating a lego set out of my own hand drawn pieces which I can use to fabricate sculptures. In past work I focused on structures and facades, suggesting the utility of each building and often illustrating a state of disrepair or decay. Over time I have become more interested in describing subterranean spaces and thinking of ways to create sculptural objects within these worlds. I have introduced a good deal of color into my new work creating a certain levity and illustrative quality. Most recently I’ve made a few flower sculptures and a cactus, which has been a nice contrast to the architectural worlds I’ve been building. I’ve always been interested in how plants and vegetation persist and reclaim our man made environments. 

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We love the fantastical quality of your three-dimensional works. What do you hope the viewers experience when looking at your art?

I hope my work can be enjoyed in the same way I enjoy Bill Watterson’s writing and art in the Calvin and Hobbes books. My goal is to offer a chance for the viewer to be transported into another world. I have always had a particular interest in existentialism and enjoy a good mystery or thriller movie. I enjoy movies and books that keep some loose ends. My art is full of open ended narratives, I offer a few leads, but most of my work is like a series of clues or a simple statement. I try to create art that is uplifting and rewards the viewer for their curiosity. 

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Tell us about the work that will be on display at Scope during this year’s Art Basel Week in Miami. What is this year's focus?

I’m super excited to be exhibiting with Paradigm Gallery again this year at Scope! have a few small object based sculptures of flowers, and several wall mounted sculptures of cities and buildings above subterranean labyrinths. The underworlds are full of sculptural objects; ladders, bridges, buckets, and columns. Each of the sculptures are like vignettes or scenes describing a particular time. The narratives in the sculptures are generally about a place that has been harvested for its resources or supernatural power. The object based sculptures I’ve been making are like keepsakes or relics of these worlds but made to life sized scale. 

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What is your process like? How does each piece come to life from references to execution?

Everything always starts with drawing. Usually a very small and unrefined sketch. When making the wall mounted city sculptures I typically have an idea for a few visual elements I’m interested in using, like a bridge, a doorway, or the a shape of a building. Using that as a starting point, I will loosely create a composition of platforms, walls and objects to help support the focus of each piece. Sometimes there is a visual motif that interests me, like the brick and bone sculpture or the bone in a stone, and I will make it as quick as possible to capture the idea in my head. But I enjoy being able to improvise with the larger works and add pieces to the narrative as I’m building. I love seeing the drawings I make come to life. Sometimes I’ll draw stuff for years before it really clicks how I can build it or use it in a sculpture. I try to keep a notebook on hand all the time to keep track of ideas and building techniques. It’s always fun to look back through old notebooks and see where things started and how they’ve evolved over time. 

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How do you replenish your inspiration? What are a few of your hobbies outside of the studio? 

Great question! I wish I had a better routine to make myself sound like an interesting  person… I’ve been watching a lot of movies and old/new shows on Netflix and Hulu. I still try to play the new Mario and Zelda games when they come out. I play basketball when I can, although my glory days are definitely behind me. I grew up playing a lot of sports and I (embarrassingly) enjoy reading the statistics and history of sports. I’m always busy working on something with my best friends with whom I’m part of a collaborative sculpture crew (@individualscollective), always a blast and we have been doing that together for TEN YEARS now! Crazy. Alas, I’ve been keeping things pretty simple these days. When I’m not in the studio getting weird I mostly hang out with my lady Emilia and enjoy walking around Philly soaking in all that gritty goodness that surrounds us.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Nancy Hoffman

President of Nancy Hoffman Gallery

520 West 27th Street
New York, New York 10001
www.nancyhoffmangallery.com

Joseph Raffael,  Peony for Reuben , Nancy Hoffman Gallery

Joseph Raffael, Peony for Reuben, Nancy Hoffman Gallery

What is the gallery's focus at this year's fair?

An overview of the best and newest works by gallery artists including mini-solos by several artists, as well as paintings, photographs, video, sculpture, created for the Miami Art Fair. 

 Two monumental works by Hung Liu based on photographs of Dorothea Lange, 7 x 7 feet, riveting images from the Dust Bowl and Depression.

Are there specific artists or works that collectors should pay attention to at your booth?

We are only bringing works we want visitors to pay attention to.  The new Hung Liu monumental pieces, the new Raffael watercolors of flowers of small scale, and the new Nicolas Africano glass figure sculptures are particular highlight this year.

What trends have you noticed in the art market over the past few years?

The biggest trend I have noticed in the art market over the years is pluralism.

What are some of your favorite aspects of being a part of Art Miami?

The fact that visitors often say it is their favorite of all the Miami fairs.  There is an energy and excitement in the aisles of the fair, of discovery.

Hung Liu,  In the South , Nancy Hoffman Gallery

Hung Liu, In the South, Nancy Hoffman Gallery

Please give our readers a few tips for making the most of attending art fairs based on your experience. 

Take the necessary time to walk through the fair and then revisit the stands with works of art that speak to you.  Learn as much as you can from the dealers about the artists and the works of art.

Buy your tickets to Art Miami 2017 here:

Top 10 Highlights at the Chicago Art Book Fair 2017

During November 16-19, Chicago hosted its first annual Chicago Art Book Fair, featuring over 100 independent publishers, small presses, comic and zine-makers, printmakers, and more. Taking over two floors of the stunning Chicago Athletic Association Hotel, the amount of incredibly unique and innovative artists and publishers kept the crowd buzzing with eager curiosity and excitement, while not being too overwhelming. Its a chance to meet individual illustrators and artists as well as small printing presses that publish everything from short story collections to risograph printed zines. Not just from Chicago, this international book fair had an endless amount of talent, making the top 10 highlights difficult to narrow down. Take a look at these 10 amazing artists and publishers who’s work blew the crowd away!

1. Cold Cube Press / Mount Analogue

Cold Cube Press is a printing service based in Seattle, Washington that prints using a risograph process, which is a process similar to a silkscreen as it prints one color at a time, making their book Cold Cube 003 (featured above) even more impressive! It features the artwork of over 30 artists and poets. Sharing the booth with Cold Cube are their neighbors and collaborators, Mount Analogue. Mount Analogue has their hands in so many amazing projects, as they are a interdisciplinary publishing studio, installation gallery, small press book shop while also hosting community events.

2. Extra Vitamins

Extra Vitamins is the multi-disciplinary creative studio of Julia Belamarich and Kyle Garfield that emphasizes the intersection of art and design. They produce unique and playfully designed apparell, tote bags, illustrated books, zines, and more.

3. Pegacorn Press

Pegacorn Press is a queer and feminist project ran by artist Caroline Paquita based in Brooklyn, New York. They publish and produce zines, comics, and other print ephemera along with patches and even plush dolls.  Much of the work produced is a collaboration between Paquita herself and other artists.

4. Marnie Galloway

Marnie Galloway is a cartoonist and illustrator hailing from Chicago, who works primarily in fiction and poetic comics. Her work In the Sounds and Seas, which was featured at the fair, is an intricate and striking, black and white, wordless graphic novel. 

5. The Bettys

The Bettys is an art collective that produces and publishes zines and curates events in and around New York City. Their work primarily focus on supporting women, people of color, and LBTQ communities. Other products produced by the collective include catchy and powerful pins and stickers.

6. Chloe Perkis

Chloe Perkis is a Chicago-based artist who creates risograph prints, comics, zines, and pins that often feature a strong female presence. On top of creating her own printed ephemera, she has also curates exhibitions. One of which, a show titled Sucias, had a unique zine printed in conjunction with the exhibition that was available at Perkis' booth. 

7. Authorized to Work in the U.S.

Authorized to Work in the U.S. is a multi-disciplinary project run by artist and publisher Cem Kocyildrim. The artist sells his incredible work on a mobile art gallery, the "Riso Bike," which he peddles around NYC. Kocyildrim's personal work shines light on issues surrounding immigrant life and the U.S.

8. Floss Editions

Floss Editions is a small printing press that publishes books, zines, and apparel of amazing quality, with brilliantly bold colors, that feature a variety of talented artists. They are based out of Oakland, California, but publish work by artists all over the US.

9. Perfectly Acceptable

Perfectly Acceptable Press is a publishing house and risograph printing studio, located in the fair's host city of Chicago. They publish small edition zines, comics, and other art books, with their content and aesthetic being incredibly diverse. 

10 Jamiyla Lowe

Jamiyla Lowe is an artist and illustrator based out of Toronto, whose quality work can be described as fantastical and mystical. Her impressively rendered creations can be found in the form of limited edition prints, wall hangings, tote bags, and t-shirts.

 

Featured image courtesy of Mount Analogue/Cold Cube Press

Paradigm Gallery: Caitlin McCormack at Scope Miami Beach

Caitlin McCormack received a BFA in Illustration in 2010 from the University of the Arts (Philadelphia, PA). She currently lives and works in Philadelphia, PA. McCormack has exhibited her work nationally and internationally. Select gallery exhibitions include Vanilla Gallery, Tokyo; Last Rites Gallery, NYC; Red Truck Gallery, New Orleans; Spoke Art, San Francisco; Jonathan Levine Projects, Jersey City; Antler Gallery, Portland; Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn; La Luz de Jesus, Los Angeles; Paradigm Gallery + Studio, Philadelphia; Cotton Candy Machine, Brooklyn, amongst others. Her work has been presented in several museum shows including The Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke; The Morbid Anatomy Museum, Brooklyn; and The Mütter Museum, Philadelphia; as well as Museum Rijswijk, Rijswijk NL.

For more information contact Paradigm Gallery or visit their booth at Scope December 5-10, 2017. 

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What is your current work about and what are some things you are thinking about when creating?

Memory is a very integral aspect of why I make this work - I'm very interested in how, as time passes, our memories can become warped and unfamiliar, and how they can deviate so far from the actual event they are related to. Many of the works from Lazarus Taxa are specifically about trauma and how, regardless of one's attempts to stamp horrible memories down, they always return, like sludge monsters slithering out of a tar pit. My studio is obviously full of sunshine, haha. 

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Briefly describe your process from inspiration to execution. How does each piece come to life?

My process begins with a series of sketches, done after observing a specimen either in person at a museum, or from a photograph. I base my choice regarding the particular creature that I'm going to make on my own recollections - certain animals represent different incidents that have transpired, and have sort of a totemic significance. After that, I do some drawings from memory, to move away from a totally accurate depiction of the form, since my objective is to deviate from authenticity and allow the warping of memory to take hold. Then I mentally break the skeleton down into bits and crochet the individual bones with a small hook, stiffen the pieces with glue, allow them to dry, and assemble them into the full creature. The following weeks are spent adding more glue, and waiting until the piece is structurally sound enough to support itself, so that it can be mounted to a velvet base, or under a glass bell jar.

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What do you hope your viewer feels or experiences when looking at your work?

I'm really open to any interpretation of what I do that a person might have - I guess it's interesting to me when the work conjures up some sort of an emotional response akin to what I was feeling during its creation. Some of the recent work is meant to invoke a fearsome or disconcerting response, but if that isn't successful, I'm glad to hear about anyone's personal interpretation. I love it when people feel engaged enough to go out of their way and describe their responses to the work.

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What inspires or moves you in your life and studio practice?

I'm really intrigued by entropy, or at least my sort of half-cooked understanding of it, and how matter is in a constant process of breaking down and building up, and breaking down again. I think memory follows a similar trajectory, in a weird way, which is pretty cool. I don't think I would be making these things if I didn't grow up in the woods, surrounded by animals, or if I didn't become obsessed with horror films as a teenager.

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Tell us about the work that will be on display at Scope during this year’s Art Basel Week in Miami. What is this year's focus?

A lot of the work for Scope is about the same traumatic elements as the work in Lazarus Taxa, except with some more decorative components. I suppose a portion of it relates to the mental embellishment of one's recollections, either as a coping mechanism or just an unintentional thing that happens over time.

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Do the materials you choose add a significance to the meaning of each piece?

Definitely. A large portion of the work is constructed from cotton string that I inherited from my grandmother, who taught me how to crochet. I also use found fabric remnants, lace gloves, and even vintage lingerie, and try to conjure up imagined histories for each item before incorporating them into a piece, without knowing anything about the previous owner. It adds to the narrative of my work.

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What are you most proud of in your art career up to this point?

I'm a pretty negative person, so pride isn't a thing that shows up in my head too often. I feel really lucky to be surrounded by a community of artists that I admire so strongly, and that a ton of them are actually people I can call friends. I think there's a sense of pride in that, for me - being in a place where I'm able to have friends that are a constant source of inspiration and encouragement.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Leslie Feely

Dakota Sica

Director at Leslie Feely

33 E. 68th Street, New York, NY 10065

www.lesliefeely.com

Friedel Dzubas sketches on view at ArtMiami

Friedel Dzubas sketches on view at ArtMiami

 

What is the gallery's focus at this year's fair?

This year we will be presenting a dynamic selection of post war and contemporary art. Including works by Richard Diebenkorn, Jules Olitski, Friedel Dzubas and Kenneth Noland.  The presentation will include highlights from each artist’s career; including Diebenkorn’s Ocean Park series, Olitski’s early sprays, and Noland’s sixties stripe paintings.

Painting by Frank Stella, Private Collection New York

Painting by Frank Stella, Private Collection New York

Are there specific artists or works that collectors should pay attention to at your booth? 

Featured in our booth are paintings by Kikuo Saito a Japanese painter who sadly passed away just last year.  During the final years of his life Saito created the most spectacular paintings of his career.  Currently we represent the Estate of the Artist and are pleased to present these cherished late works.  

KIKUO SAITO , Kikuo Saito,  Blueher , 2014, oil on canvas, 66.75 x 47.5 in

KIKUO SAITO, Kikuo Saito, Blueher, 2014, oil on canvas, 66.75 x 47.5 in

What trends have you noticed in the art market over the past few years?

In the last few years I have seen collectors revisit overlooked / undervalued talents.  Most recently I have seen a real increase in the market of Friedel Dzubas. These beautiful paintings previously traded for low figures comparatively to his peers.  Now in just a few years the artist’s market is strong and growing.  We will be showing a selection of paintings by Friedel Dzubas - this would be a great opportunity for collectors to acquire works by this artist.

Robert Motherwell,  Delicados , 1980, Acrylic and collage on board, 10 x 8 in

Robert Motherwell, Delicados, 1980, Acrylic and collage on board, 10 x 8 in

What are some of your favorite aspects of being a part of Art Miami?

Art Miami is Miami’s original fair.  It stays true to its roots and is an excellent place for experienced and new collectors alike to find top quality works.  It is not only a chance for us to be with our fellow galleries from New York – but also meet new galleries from around the world.

Richard Diebenkorn,  Untitled , c. 1967, Charcoal, ballpoint pen and graphite on paper, 16.9 x 13.8 in

Richard Diebenkorn, Untitled, c. 1967, Charcoal, ballpoint pen and graphite on paper, 16.9 x 13.8 in

Please give our readers a few tips for making the most of attending art fairs based on your experience. 

There is a lot to see, so it’s good to pace yourself.   I recommend coming to ArtMiami more than once - often the VIP opening can be quite busy and hard to get a full sense of the works.  To avoid the crowd, I recommend coming early when the doors open.  We look forward to meeting you at our booth this year!

Buy your tickets to Art Miami 2017 here:

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: James Barron Art

James Barron

Owner of James Barron Art

17 Old Barn Road
PO Box 2
Kent, CT 06757

www.jamesbarronart.com

Beverly Pepper,  Tetrachord Altar,  1985 - 86 stainless steel, 81 3/4 x 16 3/4 x 26 1/2 inches (2017.6 x 42.5 x 67.3 cm)

Beverly Pepper, Tetrachord Altar, 1985 - 86 stainless steel, 81 3/4 x 16 3/4 x 26 1/2 inches (2017.6 x 42.5 x 67.3 cm)

What is the gallery's focus at this year's fair?

We have several focuses this year for Art Miami.

1. We will feature sculptures by Beverly Pepper that have not been exhibited in decades to celebrate the upcoming 95th birthday of the artist.  Beverly is still going strong, making art every day, and living life with her usual gusto.  It's with great pride that we also celebrate having recently placed a major outdoor Pepper sculpture in the New Orleans Museum of Art outdoor sculpture garden.  The work should be installed late next year, and it points to the resurgence of interest in Pepper's work. This will be our third feature of Beverly Pepper at Art Miami.  Each year, we place these works with major US collectors and museum trustees. For Art Miami 2017, we will exhibit a major Altar sculpture that has been in the artist's private collection and hasn't been seen in decades.  It's a masterpiece.  We will also continue our exploration of her totemic Messenger series.  These have found their way into our top clients' homes and are wonderful works to live with.

2. We will continue to highlight American and Italian art, and the relation and cross references between the two counties' art.  Having lived in Rome for 11 years, from 2003 to 2014, and continuing to divide my time, I am continually amazed by the cultural fluency and influence between American and Italian art.   (See below for particular works.)

Sol LeWitt,  Color Brushstrokes , 1994 gouache on paper, 30 x 22 inches (76.2 x 55.88 cm)

Sol LeWitt, Color Brushstrokes, 1994 gouache on paper, 30 x 22 inches (76.2 x 55.88 cm)

Are there specific artists or works that collectors should pay attention to at your booth? 

For Art Miami 2017, we are pleased to exhibit a major Kounellis wall relief that has never been exhibited in the US.  The artist died this year and was given a state funeral in Rome.  We will also exhibit a major Cy Twombly work on paper, "Study for the Triumph of Galatea," which was in one Italian collection since it was created.  It is one of a series of studies for the painting, 'Triumph of Galatea,' at The Menil, Houston.  This work refers also the Raphael fresco in the Farnesina, a five-minute walk to Trastevere from the artist's studio in Rome.

We will exhibit the relationship between American Color Field abstraction, such as Jules Olitski Spray paintings, from 1965-68, with the glass sculptures of Laura de Santillana, who has created works from her Tokyo-Ga series especially for our booth at Art Miami 2017.

What trends have you noticed in the art market over the past few years?

Collectors find us more frequently through our gallery site and through on-line sites, Artnet and Artsy. Then it is up to us to forge the sort of relationship with a collector that we pride ourselves in -- not just in one sale, but in developing an ongoing relationship that can continue for decades. We also find that collectors we met at Art Miami, sometimes even 5, 6, 7 years ago, will email us out of the blue and remind us of a work they saw and a conversation we had.  

We are also pleased to see more collectors sharing their collection as private museums.  Done correctly, sharing the art with a wide viewing audience, this is a high form of philanthropy and can create cultural growth in a rural area.  I will point to Magazzino in Garrison, NY as the epitome of what can be done with passion and love for art, and it's contagious in the best way.  It is now leading to music and readings series, and it helps form, with our gallery, a cultural trail between Magazzino, Dia Beacon and MassMOCA. People are busier and spend less time going to the actual gallery exhibitions.  One hears this from nearly everyone in galleries across the US.  So it's essential to have excellent installation photos of exhibitions and a strong event program to build the culture around an exhibition and promote the ideas behind the art.

What are some of your favorite aspects of being a part of Art Miami?

I like that Art Miami opens the night before the Art Basel Miami fair.  We see everyone at the opening, including some of the top collectors and their art advisors, museum curators and directors.  Often, the day after Art Basel Miami, these same collectors hurry back to our booth, realizing that we exhibit quality art priced fairly. Art Miami is less pretentious than some fairs, which to me is important.  It's a friendly fair and it is attracting better galleries every year.  

Jannis Kounellis,  Untitled , 2001 Iron, jute sack, gypsum, 39.5 x 27.5 x 16.5 inches (100 x 70 x 42 cm)

Jannis Kounellis, Untitled, 2001 Iron, jute sack, gypsum, 39.5 x 27.5 x 16.5 inches (100 x 70 x 42 cm)

Please give our readers a few tips for making the most of attending art fairs based on your experience

1. Be sure to attend the Art Miami opening. If you see something you love, don't wait too long and think you can see every fair and that the work will still be available.  It often is not.  

2. Return to the fair on successive days. We re-install our booth several times, replacing works we have sold with works of equal interest.

3. Ask questions.  Don't be intimidated.  We want to have an art dialogue.  We have shelves for viewing and bring many works for our in-booth storage area.  Once we understand the sort of art a client is looking for, we often spend time refining what we can show, first hand.  Many of our sales at Art Miami are through this sort of prolonged dialogue, not just walking in and seeing the art that is on view.

4. Find a dealer you can trust and then spend as much time as possible learning. A dealer should be fluent in art history, and not just art of the recent past.

5. Arrive at 11 AM when the fair opens and be the first to a booth.  You will have time when it is quiet and you can see the art and feel the art more clearly, and know what moves you and what you want to live with.

6.  Go back to a dealer over the final weekend, especially on Saturday afternoon and any time on Sunday. The fair is more crowded but there are fewer collectors. You will have good quality time with a dealer, who can spend more time with you, unlike at the opening, when there are many people to see and attend to. The weekend can be an excellent time to find a work, especially one from our on-site storage area.

Buy your tickets to Art Miami 2017 here:

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Allan Stone Projects

Interview with Bo Joseph

Director of Allan Stone Projects

535 West 22nd Street, 3rd Floor

New York, NY 10011

www.allanstoneprojects.com

Wayne Thiebaud,    Nude (Seated Nude),  1963 Oil on canvas 60 x 36 in. Courtesy: Allan Stone Projects, New York © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Wayne Thiebaud, Nude (Seated Nude), 1963 Oil on canvas 60 x 36 in. Courtesy: Allan Stone Projects, New York © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

What is the gallery's focus at this year's fair?

Consistent with the gallery’s long history, our booth program will illustrate artistic kinship and visual legacies by presenting works by mid-level contemporary artists in dialogue with historically significant works of the Modern and Post-War period. While the works on view will span a range of styles and genres, from Abstract Expressionism to figuration, what they all have in common is a mastery of their underlying abstraction.

Are there specific artists or works that collectors should pay attention to at your booth? 

Having represented Wayne Thiebaud from 1962 to 2006, we have the unique capability to present an exceptional cross section of still life, landscape and figure paintings and works on paper by this celebrated contemporary master. With a recent exhibition at White Cube and upcoming surveys at the Shrem Museum and the Morgan Library, collectors have a timely opportunity with the works we will have on view. The largest and earliest Thiebaud we will present is a commanding yet sensitive full length figure painting, entitled Nude (Seated Nude), 1963. Another artist enjoying increasing visibility and favor with collectors, who also had early success with our gallery, is the Washington DC color field painter Thomas Downing. We will have two of his very early, very popular dot paintings, in acrylic on unprimed canvas, each from 1961. At 62 inches square, the one entitled After 5 presents an opportunity for a collector looking for a dazzling period piece whose large sense of scale defies its very manageable dimensions.

What trends have you noticed in the art market over the past few years?

The proliferation of information and general visibility of works in the marketplace seems to overwhelm and almost fog out the audience, especially newer buyers, but even more seasoned collectors. With all of the data available, collectors are in the best position ever to become knowledgeable about artists and their place in the art historical and market fabric, however the pace and volume at which the information is coming at them and the time constraints we all feel are impeding their ability to develop focus and connoisseurship. I see incredible opportunities for collectors who can slow down the viewing and hunting process, and engage dealers personally as resources and as allies in their effort to grow and evolve. 

What are some of your favorite aspects of being a part of Art Miami?

Every year, most of the visitors who arrive at Art Miami after their opening day at Basel Miami say the same thing: "the energy over here [at Art Miami] is so much more positive and accessible, and there are so many good things!" This is a great affirmation for any dealer interested in maintaining a sense of approachability and inclusiveness while also presenting works of the highest quality and desirability. Art Miami has a rewarding balance between serious business opportunities and the altruistic motivations that many dealers struggle to maintain these days.

Please give our readers a few tips for making the most of attending art fairs based on your experience.

First, slow down and try to remove the filters that can cut you off from seeing something extraordinary. Try to give yourself over to the experience of looking, rather than judging. Then engage the dealers: introduce yourself, ask them questions about the works that interest you. Even if the works you see are not the exact fit, sharing your interests could help a dealer to connect you with that life changing work of art.

Buy your tickets to Art Miami 2017 here:

(Header image: Thomas Downing, After 5, 1961 acrylic on canvas 62 x 62 in. Courtesy: Allan Stone Projects, New York © Estate of Thomas Downing)