Anna Teiche

Working in large-scale oil painting, Anna Teiche’s work centers around explorations of human and cultural relationships through use of vivid color, light, and pattern. A graduate of the BFA Art & Design program at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, Teiche has recently relocated to Seattle, Washington, her hometown. Growing up in the Pacific Northwest, Teiche was always fascinated by color and pattern, especially influenced by her grandmother’s stories of her Scandinavian heritage, and the many Renaissance and Medieval paintings she saw at the Seattle Art Museum as a child. Recently, Teiche completed a public wall-hanging sculpture commission for Cal Poly, which is now on display as part of the permanent collection.

Using bright patterns and vintage fabrics Anna Teiche creates large scale oil paintings and fiber sculptures that feel inviting and friendly at a glance, but allow for more ambiguous, uncomfortable revelations upon further investigation. Through color, pattern, and light Teiche analyzes how bodies interact with each other and the spaces they inhabit, creating narratives that reveal how body language can suggest the underlying psychology of a scene. The work fluctuates between abstraction and figuration, forcing the viewer to find a coherent image in the saturated combinations of fabrics. Using combinations of plaids, stripes, and vintage floral prints, patterns are combined based on color relationships, creating environments that feel pulsating with warm light and pattern, pushing the compositions more towards abstract fragments than real spaces. Referencing the figurative poses found in Medieval and Renaissance painting, Teiche intertwines fabric, color, and seemingly severed limbs to create compositions that are reminiscent of historical paintings, but quickly disintegrate into chaotic scenes of fragmented bodies and dislocated pieces.

Andrea Taylor

Andrea makes work in an attempt to satisfy an obsession with visceral responses to visual art. She seeks to access the power and the vulnerability of the feminine embodied experience, creating works for her own exploration and, equally, to engage in conversations with other works and with the body and mind of the viewer.

Andrea’s sculptures are, in a way, self-portraits as the artist continues to attempt the impossible – to show what it feels like to live in a body. These abstract figures have grown out of years of drawing and painting the 19th century Serpentine Dance stills from Loïe Fuller’s dance performed by an unknown dancer and filmed by the Lumière Brothers. Titles often reference the body or dance and movement. Andrea thinks of the abstract figure – a stand in for her own figure – as picking up bits and pieces from the various times she travels through. These are evidenced in the drawn marks, painted areas and sections of fabric and needle felting.

There is a sense of time shown through artist’s hand evident in the work and the process of its creation. The artist turns the sculpture as she works on it, responding as much as a painter as a sculptor in her sense of composition and form - the embodied mark intentionally left by the trace of her hand.

Andrea holds an MFA in Visual Art from Vermont College of Fine Arts. She completed a Spring Intensive artist residency at Banff Centre, May 2017, and two collaborative artist residencies with Margery Theroux at Anvil Centre August 2017 and at Miranda Arts Project Space in Port Chester, NY in 2015. She had solo shows in 2016 at Malaspina Printmakers and at Back Gallery Project in Vancouver. Andrea teaches Continuing Studies at Emily Carr University of Art & Design in Vancouver.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Osborne Samuel Gallery

www.osbornesamuel.com

December 4 –9, 2018

In its 29th edition, Art Miami maintains a preeminent position in America's modern and contemporary art fair market and is globally recognized as a primary destination for the acquisition of the most important works from the 20th and 21st centuries.


Interview with Peter Osborne

Briefly tell us about your gallery and what type of art you specialize in.

High quality British and American art including Moore, Chadwick Sam Francis, Jim Dine.

What can visitors expect from your booth this year and what specific works should they pay attention to?

Rare unique works by Chadwick not seen before, a remarkable Sam Francis painting, new works by Jim Dine.

What tips would you share with new art collectors or fair visitors?

Do not try and do too much, spend more time at fewer locations. Come early.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Landau Contemporary at Galerie Dominion

www.galeriedominion.ca

December 4 –9, 2018

In its 29th edition, Art Miami maintains a preeminent position in America's modern and contemporary art fair market and is globally recognized as a primary destination for the acquisition of the most important works from the 20th and 21st centuries.


Interview with Tim Dunn and Sara Landau

Briefly tell us about your gallery and what type of art you specialize in.

Landau Contemporary acquired the Dominion Gallery, Canada's oldest and most prestigious private art establishment in October 2005. The gallery offers a stunning showcase for modern masters alongside an exciting ensemble of contemporary international artists including Yves Zurstrassen, Christoph Kiefhaber, Kwang-Young Chun and Tony Scherman. Landau Contemporary is also the exclusive North American dealer for the Austrian master, architect and artist Friedensreich Hundertwasser.

"Landau Fine Art was already well established as one of the world's leading galleries specializing in early 20th century international art," explains Canadian art dealer Robert Landau. "Dominion represented a unique opportunity to offer the works of living artists under the umbrella of their more famous 20th century predecessors.”

The partnership between Landau Contemporary at Galerie Dominion and Landau Fine Art guarantees a wealth of choice for art lovers and collectors to experience, in an extensive exhibition space exceeding 20,000 square feet in a stunning Victorian landmark on Sherbrooke Street West.

What can visitors expect from your booth this year and what specific works should they pay attention to?

history will come alive at Landau Contemporary at Art Miami, where we will be featuring an exceptional collection of paintings and sculptures from the Estate of Antoni Clavé, which will be presented alongside Britain’s most celebrated modern sculptor, Henry Moore, among others. Both of these extraordinary exhibitions will include works that span over 40 years of the Artist’s careers. These are only two of the highlights that will be on exhibit exclusively at Art Miami this December, where Landau Contemporary will feature over 100 artworks in 2,000 square feet of exhibition space.

What tips would you share with new art collectors or fair visitors?

We encourage collectors to take the time to really look and interact with the works on display. Great artworks repay the attention they are given, and the more you look the more you have an opportunity to see. Experiencing and engaging with art is a slow burning process, so don’t try to absorb everything in one visit.

Above image:

Antoni Clavé, Diptyque Et Demi II, Oil and collage on canvas, 209x350cm./821⁄4x1373⁄4in., 1994, Landau Contemporary at Galerie Dominion, Montreal, Canada

Anne Cecile Surga

Anne Cecile was born in 1987 in Lavelanet, France. She demonstrated a natural interest in art and other manual activities during her childhood, and in 2000 she entered her first drawing and painting class. She learnt classical rules of compositions, anatomy, and harmony of colors along with different techniques such as drawing, pastel, china ink and oil painting. 

Anne Cecile enrolled in a business school in 2006 while studying clay sculpture in the evening. She later graduated with a Master in Business Administration. In 2012, she went to New York City where she graduated with a Master in Art History. 

In 2013 Anne Cecile stayed at the Fundacion Pablo Atchugarry where she learnt how to cut marble. Following this experience marble becomes her main material. In 2015, she decides to entirely dedicate her life to her artistic practice and open her studio in the Pyrenean Mountains in France. 

Statement

I am searching the spectrum of the personal and the emotional, and how our contemporary consumerist society affects the way we live, feel and develop the notion of the selves. 

I am interested in how human continue to be true to their core in this environment despite the daily violence it obliges us to face and to commit to other. My works can be understood as elaborations of emotional reactions to societal issues.

As a woman, my work is reflective of the distinctive challenges that I face in my private life, and I believe it shines a light and a commentary on societal issues that are inherent of our time.

I decided to pursue my inquiry into identity through the specific lens of Trauma, whether it being physical, emotional or psychological. I am exploring how it affects one or more persons, and which strategies of survival can be found.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Galerie von Vertes

www.vonvertes.com

December 4 –9, 2018

In its 29th edition, Art Miami maintains a preeminent position in America's modern and contemporary art fair market and is globally recognized as a primary destination for the acquisition of the most important works from the 20th and 21st centuries.


Interview with Quirine Verlinde

Briefly tell us about your gallery and what type of art you specialize in.

Founded by Laszlo Vertes, the eponymous gallery was conceived as an international exhibition platform specializing in 20th- and 21st-century art. Centrally located on the Bahnhofstrasse in Zürich the gallery builds and manages private and public collections, organizes exhibitions and gives lectures on art and art market related subjects. “With Vertes I tried to create a democratic space for the exploration and understanding of the inexhaustible diversity of art and its creators.“ Exceptional pieces by Albers, Calder, Chagall, Chamberlain, Condo Ernst, Francis, Kusama, Lichtenstein, Miró, Richter, Soulages, Vasarely, Warhol and Wesselmann are permanently on display in the 200 square meter gallery in Zurich.

What can visitors expect from your booth this year and what specific works should they pay attention to?

For the 2018 Edition of Art Miami we are showcasing a bold selection of 20th and 21st century paintings, works on paper and sculptures. Specific focus points are a variety of stabiles by Alexander Calder, mesmerizing Infinity Nets and Infinity Dots by Yayoi Kusama, intriguing portraits by George Condo and vibrant abstract works by Gerhard Richter.

What tips would you share with new art collectors or fair visitors?

Collecting is about art, its creators, the history behind it, the development of our personal taste, spirituality, connection and a way of life. Collecting is piecing together the story of you a a collector human being in this world. The price and the name of the artist are of minor importance. What is important is the connection you feel with a particular work of art and that from the moment it hangs on your wall you keep discovering new elements that you did you did not see before. A work of art invites the beholder to stay and linger and adds an element of joy and wonder to every home.

Above Image:

Tom Wesselmann, Little Still Life #15, Oil, plastic and plaster relief on board 12.1 × 8.9 × 1 in., 1964

Madeline Zappala

Madeline Zappala is a Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist driven towards creating conceptual archives of our digital experiences. She received her MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts/Tufts University after studying American Culture at Vassar College. Her work is largely informed by her background in photography and her interest in the intersection of collective cultural consciousness, technology and identity. Her recent projects rely on generative and conceptual writing methods to extract alternate narratives hidden in everyday digital interactions.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Galerie Terminus GMBH

www.galerie-terminus.de

December 4 –9, 2018

In its 29th edition, Art Miami maintains a preeminent position in America's modern and contemporary art fair market and is globally recognized as a primary destination for the acquisition of the most important works from the 20th and 21st centuries.


Interview With Wilhelm J. Grusdat

Briefly tell us about your gallery and what type of art you specialize in.

Art is not only our business, but it is also our passion. Specifically, we see our role as the mediator between collectors and artists. A very special vision is necessary to recognize a work of art as a potential masterpiece and as a valid manifestation of form and ideas.

Only when all of these come together, can an artwork truly radiate that very special aura to which a viewer immediately feels drawn. An exceptional work of art has much more to offer than that which meets the eye. It is this quality to which the Galerie Terminus aspires.

What can visitors expect from your booth this year and what specific works should they pay attention to?

At this year’s Art Miami we present the highlights of our current program and exciting new additions consisting of famous artists as well as young talents. We bring these two perspectives into context with each other at the fair, both as contrast and as correspondents.

On the one side, we show big names and great American Pop-Artists such as John Chamberlain, Roy Lichtenstein, Mel Ramos, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Tom Wesselmann.

On the other side, we bring young contemporary artists into focus with the Germans Christian Awe, Jan Davidoff, and Tatjana Tartakovska.

We are very proud to also be able to include exciting new works from our current program by Georg Baselitz, Sigmar Polke Gerhard Richter, and Günther Uecker. To round things up, it is our very special pleasure to exclusively present a number of early works by Georg Baselitz as well as an exquisitely typical work by Sigmar Polke.

What tips would you share with new art collectors or fair visitors?

Our presentation boils down to the bottom line which we wish to present to our fair visitors and all new art collectors: Always be on the lookout for works by artists with an international standing who are able to touch your heart and mind.

Above image:

Sigmar Polke, “Untitled,”, Oil on canvas, 59.1 x 70.9 inches. 2007

DEADRINGER exhibition by Michael Reeder

Hashimoto Contemporary is pleased to present DEADRINGER, a solo exhibition by Michael Reeder. DEADRINGER will be Reeder’s inaugural solo exhibition at Hashimoto Contemporary, in which he will be exhibiting new works that explore themes of self-identity and ego.

Through the use of bold saturated color and graphic geometric patterns blended with figurative elements, Reeder’s work delves into the concept of self, and the innate human desire to be an authentic entity. Skulls and hands are prevalent in the artists work, calling attention to both internal and external physical elements that connect us all as humans. As we strive for uniqueness, we are bound together through our humanity, highlighting the fact that we are ultimately the same.

About the exhibition, Reeder states, “I wanted to focus on how similar we as humans are regardless of our external differences and how desperately we attempt to stand apart in society. We are all composed of distinct experiences, backgrounds, cultures, fashion styles, careers, etc., yet it is all individually mashed up into a dead ringer, almost carbon copied vessel - the human body. This concept is the underlying premise of DEADRINGER.”

Please join us Saturday, December 1 from 6pm - 8pm for the opening reception of DEADRINGER. The artist will be in attendance. As an added bonus, the first 100 attendees of the exhibition will receive a free print.

This exhibition will be on view through Saturday, December 22. For more information, additional images, or exclusive content, please email us at nyc@hashimotocontemporary.com

Michael Reeder was born in Dallas, Texas in 1982, where he grew up influenced by the local skate and street culture. Drawing and painting in traditional mediums from a young age, Reeder found himself drawn to the underground, unseen, yet very public form of painting graffiti. He later moved to New York City where he received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in painting from the School of Visual Arts. Post-college, Michael took a job with Eyecon Studios in Dallas, Texas and learned to paint large-scale, traditional murals. These experiences fused with his early graffiti influence formed and grew into his portraiture work today. His work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally, along with numerous printed publications such as New American Paintings, Le Petit Voyeur and HiFructose Magazine. Reeder currently lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.

Art Miami Exhibitor Highlight: Galerie Forsblom

www.galerieforsblom.com

Booth AM117

December 4 –9, 2018

In its 29th edition, Art Miami maintains a preeminent position in America's modern and contemporary art fair market and is globally recognized as a primary destination for the acquisition of the most important works from the 20th and 21st centuries.


Interview with Katarina Siltavuori

Briefly tell us about your gallery and what type of art you specialize in.

Galerie Forsblom, founded by Kaj Forsblom in 1977, holds a unique position on the Nordic art scene as one of the largest and most international contemporary art galleries by bringing international established artists to its exhibition spaces in Helsinki and Stockholm. While the exhibition programs consist of a wide range of media within the visual arts, Galerie Forsblom is highly profiled as presenting excellence in contemporary painting as well as sculpture.

What can visitors expect from your booth this year and what specific works should they pay attention to?

Galerie Forsblom showcases both established American artists, such as Peter Halley, Jacob Hashimoto, and Keith Sonnier and young Finnish rising stars, Toni R. Toivonen and Reima Nevalainen.

Our booth presents a coherent synergy between playfulness and harmony – the booth is curated with a joyful spirit as Peter Halley’s bright-colored, neo-geometric conceptualist works juxtapose Jason Martin’s large-scale monochromatic sculptural paintings which consist of thick surfaces of oil or acrylic gel.

The booth prevails a lingering harmonic atmosphere with Jacob Hashimoto’s works, which combine Japanese handicraft tradition with Anglo-American minimalism, Stephan Balkenhol’s raw and spontaneous wood sculptures, and Bernar Venet’s dynamic steel sculptures and arches, playing with gravity and three-dimensionality.

What tips would you share with new art collectors or fair visitors?

Be curious and ambitious. Let passion be your guide and trust your instincts. Buying art can be fun – and don’t be afraid to go big!

Above image:

Jacob Hashimoto, Reaching Desperately for the Darkening Sky Through Geographies of Time and Season, 2018 Acrylic, paper, bamboo, wood and Dacron, 167.64h x 152.40w x 20.96d cm, 66hx60wx8.25din

Jimmy Viera

I am a painter and printmaker currently living and working in Portland, Maine. For years now in my art practice I have been both interested in gesture and object and the relationship they share spatially in my work. Most of my curiosity with gesture and mark making comes from the pleasure of very quickly creating something that resonates with you and wanting to preserve it. This idea of elongating a quick moment in time is carried into the physical process of painting as well. The shape or mark is made, then re-drawn on the masking, and finally the masking is cut. These steps make for a careful examination of why this particular moment is so enticing, this allows for more time with each shape rather than just attempting to create a mark directly on the support. 

The paintings serve as faux spaces in which gestures and shapes sit on the panels the way ephemera, imbued with fond memories, sit in people’s homes. Looking through my sketchbooks for the right gestures, I act as a collector adding items to shelf. Both the collector and I layer items from different times and places. By taking a wobbly line I made today and placing it in a painting with a cylindrical shape I made three months ago, I am able to collage my gestures into a piece with more history than if I had been just painting intuitively.

www.jimmyviera.com 

Laura Berger : Sentient at Hashimoto Contemporary

Hashimoto Contemporary is pleased to present Sentient - the inaugural solo exhibition by Chicago-based artist Laura Berger. Utilizing her signature glyphic style, she explores connectivity and community in her new body of work.

Concise female figures commune, dance and support one another in Berger’s acrylic on panel paintings. Each character is at once an individual totem and an integral piece of a larger composition upholding the communities created within each of Berger’s paintings.

Shadowy echos of figures mirror their more vivid counterparts, evoking a sense of history and unity as in Next Life, pictured above. These ghostly apparitions seem to lend their support and serve as a reminder of past generations.

The new paintings created for Sentient are energized with more vivid and fiery tones, eliciting a sense of power and energy. Berger’s minimalist paintings are imbued with a deep reverence for community and togetherness paired with a perceptive sensitivity that emanates hope.

Please join us for Sentient, opening Saturday, December 1st with an evening reception from 6pm-9pm, where the artist will be in attendance.

This exhibition is on view December 2 through 24. For more information, additional images, or exclusive content, please email us at sf@hashimotocontemporary.com

Holiday Shopping Guide From Our Community

If you are looking to buy your loved ones something special this holiday, look no further. Artists from around the world are offering incredible original works and prints fit for every budget.

Support your art community and give something unique this year (or keep it for yourself).

Beauty and Toxicity: Interview with Meganne Rosen

I just moved back to Springfield, Missouri after residing in Oakland, California for two years where I recently graduated with a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco. I completed my Master of Arts (MA) in Studio Art and Theory at Drury University in 2011.

My recent projects include my thesis exhibition at Minnesota Street Project in San Francisco; the publication of “Isoluminance, Racial Trauma, and the Stamina of Perception: Amanda Wallace’s Field | House” for the Wattis Institute of Contemporary Arts and contemtporary.org; my curation and participation in Artifice & Nature, a four person exhibition at CCA; and my inclusion in group exhibitions in Davis, California; Ventura, California; Woodstock, NY; and Newport, OR.

I just returned from artist residencies at LACAWAC in Aerial Lake, Pennsylvania and Byrdcliffe in Woodstock, New York.

My next solo exhibition will be at Bookmarx in Springfield, Missouri and opens December, 7, 2018.

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Statement

Observation and curiosity drive my studio practice. Through the investigation of and experimentation with different kinds of materials, I express discontent with the current political climate as well as reflect on my experiences growing up in the American Midwest. My work explores entropy, artifice, consumerism, and my place in the lineage of abstraction in contemporary and modern painting and its relationship with installation art.

I compose mixed media pieces which are layered in visual dialogues. Some of the works reference the body in scale and are costume-like. The work evokes an intimate recollection of garments worn, skins shed, and packaging discarded. Each assemblage or installation is a partnership between the materials I work with and the sociopolitical, cultural context of our times.

Currently, I am working on a series of oil paintings on transparent acetate. For these works, my palette is inspired by the alluring sheen of oil spills on pavement and the iridescence of polluted sea foam. The intersection of the natural and the artificial is a site of challenge, conquest, and cohabitation. This work explores toxicity through artifice and decay. As light filters through the paint and acetate, ephemeral auras are projected on the walls creating an additional layer of color. When the works are rolled, they become core samples. Black holes of color with little universes enclosed inside. When the various iterations of this series are placed in proximity to each other, a visual conversation emerges between painting and sculpture, density and light, toxicity and beauty.

www.megannerosen.com

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Tell me about yourself. What was your artistic journey like up to this point? How did you arrive at your current body of work?

Art has always been part of my life. My family home is filled with art and books and artifacts. My mother is a fiber artist and teaches weaving at a liberal arts college. My paternal grandmother was an artist and a poet who made stained glass windows and velvet wall hangings (image of one of Barbara Rosen's windows is attached). On family vacations, we always visited art museums. I love museums. Growing up in a family that held art in such high regard and also created an environment embedded with art objects made studying and pursuing art seem reasonable and normal. I met a lot of people in college who were majoring in business or something equally pragmatic who lamented the fact that they had to give up their love of the arts because of familial pressure. I understand that I come from a place of privilege on many levels, but I am particularly aware of how fortunate I am to have parents who value art. Their support has been very fundamental to my pursuit of a career in the arts. As an undergraduate, I majored in art history and minored in fine arts and English. I have a master's of arts in studio art and theory (Drury University) and a master's of fine arts in painting (California College of the Arts).

My current body of work developed while I was pursuing my MFA at California College of the Arts. I relished the opportunity to have devoted studio time and feedback from advisors. I was able to spend a great deal of time experimenting with new materials and concepts to push my painting further.

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Tell me about the inspiration behind your recent series.

Currently, I am working on a series of oil paintings on transparent acetate. For these works, my palette is inspired by the alluring sheen of oil spills on the pavement and the iridescence of polluted sea foam. The intersection of the natural and the artificial is a site of challenge, conquest, and cohabitation. This work explores toxicity through artifice and decay. As light filters through the paint and acetate, ephemeral auras are projected on the walls creating an additional layer of color. When the works are rolled, they become core samples. Black holes of color with little universes enclosed inside. When the various iterations of this series are placed in proximity to each other, a visual conversation emerges between painting and sculpture, density and light, toxicity and beauty. A large source of inspiration for these works comes from the material itself. Working with acetate opened up a new realm of possibility in the studio for me. I had the opportunity to further explore this work in a natural setting during two artist residencies (Byrdcliffe in Woodstock, NY, and Lacawac in Lake Aerial, PA). I attached a couple of photos from Lacawac and one of me in my studio at Byrdcliffe.

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Describe your creative process. How does your work come together from inspiration to execution?

This is a tricky question to answer. I work in a few different ways. I am sometimes inspired by something I read or see external to my studio and I then start working with the theme or concept until I come up with an idea for a painting. Other times, I work intuitively with paint and other materials until something starts to take shape and then I start to steer the painting in a particular direction.

Your work is visually beautiful but has an important underlying message for the viewer. What do you hope those experiencing your work take away from it? What questions should they be asking?

I love the Helen Frankenthaler quote about a really good painting looking like it "happened all at once". I think that applies to my paintings as well. They tend to have an organic, haphazard feel to them like perhaps they came together out of a series of spills or accidents and then ended up strung from the ceiling somehow. In reality, they take me months to create a endure quite a lot of meticulous editing and arrangement. I suppose I want the viewer to been drawn in and to question what they are looking at and how it came to be. I tend to give hints (or in some cases greater enigmas) by the titles of the work. I hope the viewers end up thinking about beauty and toxicity. About the ethereal and the tangible.

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What do you love to do when you are not in the studio?

When I am not in the studio I love to read; to play trivia and do crossword puzzles with my partner, Ken; and to play with our cats.

What's next for you and what do you hope to accomplish in the next five years?

I am teaching fiber arts and 2D design as a per course instructor this semester at Missouri State University in the art and design department. Next semester, I am teaching art history and art appreciation as an adjunct at Ozarks Technical Community College.

Since my MFA thesis show last May (2018) at Minnesota Street Project in San Francisco, California, I have exhibited work in several group shows (in California, Oregon, New York, and Missouri). I am preparing for two upcoming solo exhibitions. For Blips this December (2018) I am painting one-hundred small, four-inch square paintings for BookMarx in downtown Springfield, Missouri. I am also starting work on several large acetate installation paintings for Transparency and Toxicity, a solo exhibition at Artlink Gallery in Fort Wayne, Indiana that will open in November 2019.

My proposal for the 2019 PCA/ACA conference in Washington D.C. was recently accepted, and I have begun writing “Craft, Color, & Contours: The Influence of Pop in Contemporary Art” to present next April in the Art & Design Culture section. This paper represents another area of interest for me: craft technique and media in fine arts. The last five years have seen an unprecedented uptick in the appearance of fiber art and ceramics in blue-chip galleries, international art fairs, contemporary museum collections, and graduate level fine art curriculum. Techniques and materials previously relegated to the realms of craft and hobby arts publications are now presented front and center in ArtForum. The common thread (no pun intended) between these works seems to be a heavy reference to the paintings and sculptures of the midcentury Pop Art Movement both in terms of palette and subject matter.

I would like to have a full time teaching position at the collegiate level, at least one additional solo exhibition, and at least three more published articles within the next five years. You can read my first published piece here

I enjoy writing about art and find that the research and analysis that goes into my writing projects often influences my studio work.

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From The Editor: Thank You

Dear Friend,

As I sit down and think about the fact that the magazine has been around for two years, I am filled with awe, gratitude, and excitement for things to come. As you can imagine, any creative project has its challenges and setbacks. I have been fortunate to meet an incredible team of writers, curators, and editors along with the incredible art community that keeps this publication going year after year.

From the left: Shelby (Designer), Ekaterina (Editor and Founder) and Alicia (Writer)

From the left: Shelby (Designer), Ekaterina (Editor and Founder) and Alicia (Writer)

Because of your support, we have celebrated our two-year anniversary and are excited for things ahead. Even in this digital age, there is something so special about exploring new art through print. Our passion lies in helping our readers and collectors discover new talent, or get to know familiar names in the art world on a more intimate level. From an artist's perspective, there is nothing more magical than seeing your own work on glossy pages of a quality magazine.

Reflecting on the past two years, we are proud to serve a diverse and global community of artists and we're so thankful to celebrate together with a few of you at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in October. We hope to continue engaging with you in person at curated events and through our new platform, the Art & Cocktails Podcast.

So here's your homework for the rest of the year:

I want to encourage you to start that project you keep thinking about, whether it's a new ambitious body of work or creative business venture like a zine or gallery space. If it's been on your mind for a few months or years and you just haven't pulled the trigger, start researching how you can make it happen. It's hard work, time consuming, and will make you crazy at times, but I promise you it's worth it. You will build an entire tribe, discover your strengths, and potentially help change the course of the art world.

Thank you for being a part of our thriving art community.

Warm Regards,

Ekaterina


Here are some exciting things we have been up to this year + where to find us next

Podcast 

Art and Cocktails is a casual conversation style podcast that features interviews with contemporary artists, curators, art professionals and so much more. Once in a while I also share tips and experiences that shaped my career as an artist. Listen on iTunes, Spotify, Libsyn and more: Art & Cocktails.

More Shops Across the World

We are working hard to make our print issues accessible to readers all over the planet. Send us an email if you have the perfect local bookshop that we should work with!

Retail Locations



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Live Events 

This year we bravely (introverts here)  stepped out from behind the screen and participated in a few in person events including our 2-year party, live podcast recording with I Like Your Work Podcastand introduced the magazine at Great PHL event. E-mail us your ideas for the next meetup!

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See You in Miami!

This year we are back in Miami for Art Week! We are a proud media partner of Art Miami Fairs. Be sure to let us know if you are in town that week + win tickets to Art Miami by sending us an email. 

use code BLACKFRIDAY during checkout